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Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 12
where he died. The whole episode was so pathetic as to touch the heart of the country. President Grant and his entire cabinet, together with many noted men of the North and South, attended the funeral. Mr. Greeley had gone on the bond of Jefferson Davis, that Davis might be released from prison. This act, while it lessened his influence in the North, made many friends for him in the South, where he had previously been hated on account of his advocacy of the freedom of slaves. He was one Davis might be released from prison. This act, while it lessened his influence in the North, made many friends for him in the South, where he had previously been hated on account of his advocacy of the freedom of slaves. He was one of the most remarkable men of his time, and should never have been induced to depart from the position of a great editor for which he was so eminently fitted. He was earnest, tender, and guileless, and was in no sense a man suited to the handling of the vexatious problems of politics. As has often been said before, his death may have saved him from a more cruel fate — that of ridicule. Notwithstanding the bitter warfare that had been waged against General Grant, he was elected by an overw
Roscoe Conkling (search for this): chapter 12
tion of anything which he opposed. He used effectively weapons of sarcasm and ridicule. But he was no match for Senator Conkling in this line of debate. Schurz had dubbed Senator Conkling The Powter Pigeon of the Senate, but Conkling was probabSenator Conkling The Powter Pigeon of the Senate, but Conkling was probably the author of the cognomen Mephistopheles which had been conferred upon Schurz in virtue of his peculiar physiognomy. It is needless to add that Carl Schurz was not re-elected to the Senate from Missouri, but he was subsequently appointed SecretaConkling was probably the author of the cognomen Mephistopheles which had been conferred upon Schurz in virtue of his peculiar physiognomy. It is needless to add that Carl Schurz was not re-elected to the Senate from Missouri, but he was subsequently appointed Secretary of the Interior by Mr. Hayes. He was a very remarkable man, but could never quite get over his revolutionary ideas. He was wont to say that the Roman punch was the life-saving station in Mrs. Hayes's temperance dinners. Mrs. Schurz and her daug she had made a mistake, she said: Two born in America, and one in Japan. One is named Ulysses Grant, and one other Roscoe Conkling. They were hospitable entertainers, and when you went there to a dinner they had many favors at your plate, which w
B. F. Field (search for this): chapter 12
many years, making visits to Japan and returning. General Logan and I were dining at their home one night, when Associate Justice Field sat on Madame Yoshida's right and I sat next to Justice Field. The Justice was a very agreeable conversationaliJustice Field. The Justice was a very agreeable conversationalist and Madame Yoshida had learned to speak English quite well. Justice Field said: Madame Yoshida, how many children have you? She replied: I have two American and one Japanese children, at which Justice Field smiled. Quickly realizing the fact tJustice Field said: Madame Yoshida, how many children have you? She replied: I have two American and one Japanese children, at which Justice Field smiled. Quickly realizing the fact that she had made a mistake, she said: Two born in America, and one in Japan. One is named Ulysses Grant, and one other Roscoe Conkling. They were hospitable entertainers, and when you went there to a dinner they had many favors at your plate, whicJustice Field smiled. Quickly realizing the fact that she had made a mistake, she said: Two born in America, and one in Japan. One is named Ulysses Grant, and one other Roscoe Conkling. They were hospitable entertainers, and when you went there to a dinner they had many favors at your plate, which was then the custom. I said to Madame Yoshida at one time: It will be necessary to have an express to take the beautiful things you have given us to our home. She laughed heartily over it and said she would send them to the house by her servant
Alexander McClure (search for this): chapter 12
Sumner and Schurz on General Grant and the leaders of the regular Republican party, what they called the Liberal Republican party was organized by such ambitious newspaper men as Whitelaw Reid (our late ambassador to England), Horace White, Alexander McClure, Henry Watterson, Samuel Bowles, Murat Halstead, and a number of disgruntled Republicans, who held a convention in Cincinnati, May i, 1872, and after three or four days farcical sessions nominated Horace Greeley for President and B. Gratz Be equals, if not the superiors, intellectually of the men at the head of the bureaus of the metropolitan newspapers of to-day. Among them were such men as Whitelaw Reid of the New York Tribune; J. B. McCullough of the Saint Louis Democrat; Alexander McClure of the Philadelphia Ledger; Horace White, Mr. Sheehan, of the Chicago Times; Murat Halstead, L. A. Gobright, E. B. Wight, George A. Townsend, J. Russell Young, subsequently librarian of the Congressional Library, W. Scott Smith, Eli Perkin
Horace Greeley (search for this): chapter 12
beral Republican convention nomination of Horace Greeley Mr. Greeley's Bereavement, defeat, illnesMr. Greeley's Bereavement, defeat, illness, and death Grant's second inauguration the New cabinet death of my father. Politically excie or four days farcical sessions nominated Horace Greeley for President and B. Gratz Brown, ex-Govertunity to inflict the most cruel blows upon Mr. Greeley. One caricature which caused great amusement was a cartoon of Mr. Greeley as the candidate for President, with a placard on the tail of his coid of Mr. Brown as the Vice-President. How Mr. Greeley and Carl Schurz and men of their great abile the Presidency I do not profess to know. Mr. Greeley canvassed the country and made a most feeli Presidency. Notwithstanding the fact that Mr. Greeley and Mr. Brown were indorsed by the Democratse the possibility of their election. Even Mr. Greeley's letter of acceptance of the Democratic nos home on account of the serious illness of Mrs. Greeley, which proved fatal. This sad event so aff[3 more...]
George Washington (search for this): chapter 12
and intelligent appreciation of the positions of their husbands and what was required of themselves to discharge their duties as wives and daughters. A majority of the senators and members lived in hotels and boarding-houses, for at that time Washington furnished very meagre accommodations for congressional and other official families. The schools were poor, and those who could possibly arrange for their children to attend boarding-schools away from the city did so. Almost without exception the ladies felt that they must welcome to Washington visitors who were entitled to consideration. They felt that they must, on the days assigned to the Supreme Court, the Senate, the House of Representatives, the speaker, the army, and the navy, receive all who did them the honor to call. These receptions began about two o'clock and were not supposed to end before half-past 5. During these hours hundreds of calls were made, and they were not, as to-day, considered a bore and a drudgery. Most
Mary E. Healey (search for this): chapter 12
Russell Young, subsequently librarian of the Congressional Library, W. Scott Smith, Eli Perkins, Charles Lanman, Don Piatt, Ben Perley Poore, E. V. Smalley, Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, and a host of correspondents who have made enviable reputations in their calling. Among the women reporters who wielded influential pens as correspondents of important newspapers were Mary Clemmer Ames, Mrs. Lippincott, Mrs. H. M. Barnum, Mrs. Olivia Briggs, Mrs. Coggswell, Mrs. and Miss Snead, and Miss Mary E. Healey. General Grant soon nominated his cabinet, retaining those who had served during his first term, with the exception of the Secretary of the Treasury. The members of the cabinet were: Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State; William A. Richardson, Secretary of the Treasury; W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War; George M. Robeson, Secretary of the Navy; Columbus Delano, Secretary of the Interior; John A. Creswell, Postmaster-General; George H. Williams, Attorney-General. Congress resumed its
right, E. B. Wight, George A. Townsend, J. Russell Young, subsequently librarian of the Congressional Library, W. Scott Smith, Eli Perkins, Charles Lanman, Don Piatt, Ben Perley Poore, E. V. Smalley, Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, and a host of correspondents who have made enviable reputations in their calling. Among the women reporters who wielded influential pens as correspondents of important newspapers were Mary Clemmer Ames, Mrs. Lippincott, Mrs. H. M. Barnum, Mrs. Olivia Briggs, Mrs. Coggswell, Mrs. and Miss Snead, and Miss Mary E. Healey. General Grant soon nominated his cabinet, retaining those who had served during his first term, with the exception of the Secretary of the Treasury. The members of the cabinet were: Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State; William A. Richardson, Secretary of the Treasury; W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War; George M. Robeson, Secretary of the Navy; Columbus Delano, Secretary of the Interior; John A. Creswell, Postmaster-General; George H. Willia
very much persecuted man. He had patriotically put his fortune into the Union Pacific Railroad to save it from failure, and received for this courageous and noble venture on his part condemnation and almost ostracism. He was only vindicated in after years, when the whole facts in connection with the matter came to light. In the midst of all this the Japanese embassy arrived. Congress made an appropriation for their entertainment, which sum was to be expended under the direction of General Myers, then quartermaster of the United States army, on duty at Washington. Among the social features of their entertainment a grand reception was given in the Masonic Temple, then the only hall in Washington spacious enough for such affairs. General Logan was on the committee for their entertainment, and was very much interested in all the arrangements. A magnificent banquet was laid in a room adjoining the reception-room of the Masonic Temple. The main hall was used for the reception and
William A. Richardson (search for this): chapter 12
utations in their calling. Among the women reporters who wielded influential pens as correspondents of important newspapers were Mary Clemmer Ames, Mrs. Lippincott, Mrs. H. M. Barnum, Mrs. Olivia Briggs, Mrs. Coggswell, Mrs. and Miss Snead, and Miss Mary E. Healey. General Grant soon nominated his cabinet, retaining those who had served during his first term, with the exception of the Secretary of the Treasury. The members of the cabinet were: Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State; William A. Richardson, Secretary of the Treasury; W. W. Belknap, Secretary of War; George M. Robeson, Secretary of the Navy; Columbus Delano, Secretary of the Interior; John A. Creswell, Postmaster-General; George H. Williams, Attorney-General. Congress resumed its treadmill routine, with now and again outbursts of criticism and vituperation heaped upon President Grant. On March 9 our friend Doctor John P. Taggart, of Salt Lake City, telegraphed General Logan that my father had passed away from a retu
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