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Carrara (Italy) (search for this): chapter 2
uestrian contest described in the foregoing, when she rode with General Logan's brother, William, both of whom were fine riders, but too dignified to descend to the Comanche style of their rivals from the country. The following extract will serve to show how much the town of Benton has progressed since the days of the war: Recently a member of our Self Culture Club entertained us in her new beautiful home upon the site of the old Floral Hall where long ago exaggerated pumpkins, squashes, beets, and other farm products, with great bunches of zinnias, hollyhocks, and coxcombs, competed for blue ribbons. It seems rather an odd coincidence that in the spacious reception-hall a beautiful Carrara marble Ceres smiles from a wealth of fruit and flowers, illumined with tiny incandescents. The old race-track makes a fine drive. Where the judges' stand was is a lovely pergola. The stock pond in summer is a fragrant lily pond. It all makes a beautiful environment for my lovely friend.
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
sing the great American desert too late for the war father's three years in California I am sent to boarding-school in Kentucky the sisters and the slaves girlis but a short time before the marvellous stories of the discovering of gold in California were started. Desirous of further adventure, many of those who had been to Mexico were wild to repeat their long march across the plains to California, my father among them. In the early spring of 1849 these daring spirits again assembled at postmaster, and would always open the mail to see if there were letters from California. I was then but twelve years of age, and yet at the first sound of the horn, No such long intervals between his letters again occurred, as the mails from California subsequently came by sea around the Horn. He remained two and a half years, ther and I had to care during father's absence in Mexico, and subsequently in California. I can never forget the tremor which seized me when father and I entered
Jackson County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ped in line, and at father's command, Forward, march! they moved off like veteran soldiers, leaving aching hearts and tearful eyes behind them. Arriving at Alton, father found his old friend and legislative colleague, Captain Hampton, of Jackson County, in command of Company H of the 1st Regiment. Father's men were from the counties adjoining Williamson. Captain Hampton's first lieutenant was John A. Logan, of Jackson County. My father was extremely fond of young Logan, as he was full ofJackson County. My father was extremely fond of young Logan, as he was full of fun, of a genial disposition, brave as a lion, and delighted in adventure. An intimacy soon sprang up between my father and the young officers, especially young Logan, which grew stronger when, years after their return, Lieutenant Logan demanded that father should redeem his promise to give me to him as his bride. I have often heard father and General Logan give thrilling accounts of their experiences in crossing the Great American Desert on foot; of being chased by the Indians, the tortu
Pala (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
earful face, wondering what it was all about. As soon as father could get away, he came home to tell mother he was going to Mexico. All was commotion in the home for many days following. Father's company was made Company B, 1st Regiment, Illinois Infantry Volunteers. He was ordered to march his company to Alton, Illinois, where the regiment was to rendezvous. I shall never forget the pathetic scenes which occurred the day they left Marion to begin their long march, which ended in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The wives, daughters, and sweethearts of the one hundred and ten men came into town to say their good-bys. The morning was spent in the final preparations. After a twelve-o'clock dinner, at the sound of the drum and fife, the men stepped in line, and at father's command, Forward, march! they moved off like veteran soldiers, leaving aching hearts and tearful eyes behind them. Arriving at Alton, father found his old friend and legislative colleague, Captain Hampton, of Jackson
Benton, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
welve years my senior the wedding removal to Benton early housekeeping--fair week expert equest, and my father, we departed for Benton, Franklin County, Illinois. The journey was made in buggieentered Judge Parish's hospitable door at Benton, Illinois. Judge Parish and Mr. Logan were very intg our stay with Mother Logan. Returning to Benton we remained with Judge and Mrs. Parish until oeriences; but there being no colored people in Benton, she became, in time, very much dissatisfied, ng incidents which occurred during our life in Benton. The cottage which was our first home, with iprolific sweetbriar rose, is still standing in Benton. The Illinois legislature recently passed a b, and preservation of our cottage home in Benton, Illinois, and the committee who have charge of thetie A. Dillon, wife of Captain Dillon, of Benton, Illinois. Mrs. Dillon was then Miss Hettie A. Duncxtract will serve to show how much the town of Benton has progressed since the days of the war: [1 more...]
Saint Vincent (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
be sent to school was soon settled. Father took me to Saint Vincent's Academy near Morganfield, Kentucky. Saint Vincent's wSaint Vincent's was a branch of the celebrated Nazareth Convent of Kentucky. It was then, and still is, one of the best schools in the whole lking about in their flaring white caps of the Order of Saint Vincent's, and their sombre black gowns. The priest, Father Duand unhappy. To have any. idea of the conditions at Saint Vincent's in 1854-5, it would be necessary to turn back the leaze that scarcely a single advantage which the pupils at Saint Vincent's now enjoy then existed. We were literally pioneers, to the window to watch the people who came to church at Saint Vincent's. Some of them were on horseback, some on foot, and otlding and the great to-do that we made of his coming to Saint Vincent's. We all kissed his ring, and thought it was the greatg in June, 1855, when our class graduated from dear old Saint Vincent's, when beneath the boughs of the majestic trees of the
Williamson (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
us inclinations. Communication with Washington was very limited, but when it was found that volunteers were called for, as war had been declared with Mexico, astonishing numbers rushed into the towns to try to get on the rolls. I can just remember seeing my father borne aloft above the heads of the men who elected him captain of the company. He had enlisted to serve three years, or until peace was declared. He had been sheriff of the county, and probably was the most popular man in Williamson County. The moment he announced his intention of going many more than he could enroll volunteered to go with him. The town of Marion, where we lived, was on that day thronged with people. As soon as the roster of a company was complete the men elected my father captain by acclamation. They seized him, and, to the music of a fife and drum, they hoisted him above their heads, and carried him around the court-house, shouting and huzzaing, regardless of his attempts to be put down. I remembe
Shawneetown, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ident Pierce registrar of the land office at Shawneetown, Illinois. It was an important appointment, on accounttlers inside the radius of the district of which Shawneetown was the headquarters could enter one hundred and of the office as soon as possible. We removed to Shawneetown, and father opened the land office on the first fllinois Volunteer Infantry, came to Shawneetown, Gallatin County, Illinois, where we then resided. He was theent for me to meet young Logan, who was coming to Shawneetown to make a visit at our home. Having many young-me judicial district, every two weeks found him in Shawneetown for a stay from Saturday noon until Sunday nightng Logan's friends lived at a great distance from Shawneetown, considering the facilities for travelling. We talmost impassable. At a little inn on the way to Shawneetown, in the small town of Equality, distant about twe in time, very much dissatisfied, and returned to Shawneetown, leaving me to struggle through emergencies and d
Murphysboro (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ve us a cordial welcome. I soon felt quite at home with the people whom I was later to know better, and to love as my own kindred. We remained with Judge and Mrs. Parish for a few days, and then proceeded in a one-horse buggy to Murphysboro, Jackson County, Illinois, the home of Mr. Logan's mother. Many of the residents of Murphysboro were relatives of the Logan family, and we had a very cordial reception, and were much entertained during our stay with Mother Logan. Returning to Benton Murphysboro were relatives of the Logan family, and we had a very cordial reception, and were much entertained during our stay with Mother Logan. Returning to Benton we remained with Judge and Mrs. Parish until our home was ready for occupancy. In the meantime my father and mother had sent our household goods to Benton. When we remember that everything at that time was transported by horses, mules, or oxen, we can imagine the tedious delays which frequently ensued. However, before the holidays we were ensconced in our own cottage and began life together. My mother had sent with our goods a colored mammy, whom we called Aunt Betty. Aunt Betty was to be o
Lamar (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
best of everything — from a cucumber to a mammoth pumpkin or squash; from a glass of jelly to a barrel of marmalade; from a gingersnap to huge loaves of bread and cake; from a dainty piece of embroidery to innumerable patchwork quilts; from a yard of flannel to yards of jeans and bright bayadere --striped linsey dress-goods, and rag carpeting; from a lady's fan made of the golden-bronze feathers of a turkey's tail to fly-brushes from the glory of a peacock; from a breed of Brahma, Spanish, Shanghai, Cochin, or Dominique chickens to proud cocks and blustering hens of every species; from goslings to geese and swans; from ducklings to quacking ducks of all varieties. Pigs, cattle, horses, mules, and every species of domestic animal preserved in the ark, and propagated since the days of the flood, swelled the list competing for superiority. Fruits and flowers in limitless numbers were brought and arranged to the best advantage for competition, according to the taste and tact of the exhi
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