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Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
the troops on their arrival, but the trains were not ready until the 5th. The brigades arrived at Sweetwater on the 6th, 7th, and 8th. Alexander's batteries were shipped as soon as cars were ready. To expedite matters, his horses and wagons were ordered forward by the dirt road; the batteries found cars, the last battery getting to Sweetwater on the 10th. Jenkins's division and Leydon's batteries were drawn from the lines on the 5th and ordered to meet the cars at the tunnel through Missionary Ridge. They reached the station in due season, but the cars were not there. After waiting some days, the battery horses and horses of mounted officers were ordered by the wagon road. Tired of the wait, I advised the troops to march along the road and find the cars where they might have the good fortune to meet them, the officers, whose horses had been sent forward, marching with the soldiers. General Bragg heard of the delay and its cause, but began to urge the importance of more rapid
Flint Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
on the west bank of the river, was just above the mouth of Second Creek, lying at right angles to the river. It ran to a fort constructed by the Confederates, when occupied by them years before, called Fort Loudon, above the Kingston road, and about a thousand yards in front of the college. East from that point it was about parallel with the river, reaching to Temperance Hill, to Mabry's Hill, and to the Holston, below the glass-works. An interior line extended from Temperance Hill to Flint Hill on the east, and another on the west, between the outer line and Second Creek. Dams were built across First and Second Creeks, flooding and forming formidable wet ditches over extensive parts of the line. Abatis, chevaux-de-frise, and wire entanglements were placed where thought to be advantageous for the defenders. The heights on the northeast across the river are much more elevated than the plateaux of the city side, and command all points of the west bank. These were defended at
Holston (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
the mountains east and flows west to the junction. The railroad crosses the main river at Loudon, thirty miles from Knoxville, and runs about parallel to the Holston River, and near its west bank. West of the railroad and parallel is a broken spur of the Clinch Mountain range, with occasional gaps or passes for vehicles, and somt up before night and was ordered to deploy on McLaws's left as far as the Tazewell road, preceded by Hart's cavalry, which was to extend the line north to the Holston River. General Wheeler came up later and was assigned to line with Colonel Hart. The city stands on the right bank of the Holston River, on a plateau about one aHolston River, on a plateau about one and a half miles in width and extending some miles down south. At Knoxville the plateau is one hundred and twenty feet above the river, and there are little streams called First, Second, and Third Creeks, from the upper to the lower suburbs of the city,--First Creek between the city and East Knoxville, or Temperance Hill; Second Cr
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ble that by withdrawing his army from its lines about Chattanooga to strong concentration behind the Chickamauga River, and recalling his detachment in East Tennessee (the latter to give the impression of a westward move), and at the moment of concentration sending a strong force for swift march against General Burnside.-strong enough to crush him,--and returning to Chattanooga before the army under General Sherman could reach there (or, if he thought better, let the detachment strike into Kentucky against the enemy's communications), something worth while could be effected. Presently I was called, with Lieutenant-General Hardee and Major-General Breckenridge, the other corps commanders, to learn his plans and receive his orders. He announced his purpose in general terms to send me into East Tennessee, then paused as if inviting the opinions of others, when I stated that the move could be made, but it would be hazardous to make a detachment strong enough for rapid work while his
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Chapter 33: the East Tennessee campaign. General Bragg's infatuation General Grant in che Federal forces Longstreet ordered into East Tennessee his plans for the campaign poorly suppord about camp that I was to be ordered into East Tennessee against General Burnside's army. At the muga River, and recalling his detachment in East Tennessee (the latter to give the impression of a wes purpose in general terms to send me into East Tennessee, then paused as if inviting the opinions oeral W. T. Martin; Colonels G. G. Dibbrell's Tennessee and Thomas Harrison's Texas brigades, under e report around camp that I was to go into East Tennessee, I set to work at once to try and plan the movement. As no one had proposed this East Tennessee campaign to the general, I thought it possw from our present lines and our forces in East Tennessee (the latter to be done in order to give thon to the enemy that we were retiring from East Tennessee and concentrating near him for battle or f
London, Madison County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ry along the railroad route. Pains were taken to have the bridge equipments carried by hand to the river, and skirmishing parties put in the boats and drifted to the opposite bank. The troops in rear were marched during the night to the vicinity of Loudon and held in readiness in case the enemy came to oppose our crossing. The bridge was laid under the supervision of General Alexander and Major Clark, our chief engineer, at Huff's Ferry, without serious resistance. A few miles east of London the Holston Since those days the name of Holston has been changed to the Tennessee. and Little Tennessee Rivers come together, making the Tennessee River, which flows from the confluence west to Kingston, where it resumes its general flow southwest. The Holston rises in the mountains north and flows south to the junction. The Little Tennessee rises in the mountains east and flows west to the junction. The railroad crosses the main river at Loudon, thirty miles from Knoxville, and runs a
Campbell's Station (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
wagon-roads and cattle-trails. West of this spur, and near its base, is the main wagon-road to Knoxville, as far as Campbell Station, about seventeen miles, where it joins the Kingston road, passes a gap, and unites with the wagon-road that runs with the railroad east of the mountain spur at Campbell Station. South of this gap, about eleven miles, is another pass at Lenoir's Mill, and three miles south of that another pass, not used. A detail of sharp-shooters under Captain Foster, of Jenkgons to double their teams through the mud. General Potter had sent the division under General Hartranft back to the Campbell Station Pass to occupy the junction of his line of retreat with the Kingston road and the road upon which we were marching, e that was left in observation near Kingston had been called up, and with McLaws's division advanced on the roads to Campbell Station, while General Jenkins followed the direct line of retreat on double time, and right royally did his skirmishers mov
Cleveland, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
whose horses had been sent forward, marching with the soldiers. General Bragg heard of the delay and its cause, but began to urge the importance of more rapid movements. His effort to make his paper record at my expense was not pleasing, but I tried to endure it with patience. He knew that trains and conductors were under his exclusive control, but he wanted papers that would throw the responsibility of delay upon other shoulders. On the 8th and 9th the infantry marched as far as Cleveland, about thirty miles, where the train-masters gave notice that the trains could meet them, but it was not until the 12th that the last of the brigades reached Sweetwater. While waiting for transportation, I wrote some of my friends to excuse my failure to stop and say good-by. The letter written to General Buckner was returned to me some months after, endorsed by him as having important bearing upon events as they transpired,--viz.: Wednesday, November 5, 1863. My Dear General,-- I
Mabry's Hill (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
cond plateau, with their batteries of position. The line of the enemy's works, starting at its lower point on the west bank of the river, was just above the mouth of Second Creek, lying at right angles to the river. It ran to a fort constructed by the Confederates, when occupied by them years before, called Fort Loudon, above the Kingston road, and about a thousand yards in front of the college. East from that point it was about parallel with the river, reaching to Temperance Hill, to Mabry's Hill, and to the Holston, below the glass-works. An interior line extended from Temperance Hill to Flint Hill on the east, and another on the west, between the outer line and Second Creek. Dams were built across First and Second Creeks, flooding and forming formidable wet ditches over extensive parts of the line. Abatis, chevaux-de-frise, and wire entanglements were placed where thought to be advantageous for the defenders. The heights on the northeast across the river are much more ele
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ons General Burnside's forces advance upon Knoxville affairs at Lenoir's and Campbell's stationsch south as we marched north, and meet us at Knoxville. General Bragg estimated General Burnside'sthousand of his men were on service north of Knoxville and about Cumberland Gap. To march, and any reliable people, living near and east of Knoxville, from whom I might get information of the cover, through Marysville to the heights above Knoxville on the east bank, by forced march. This wouand near its base, is the main wagon-road to Knoxville, as far as Campbell Station, about seventeeneded in reaching the vicinity of the city of Knoxville, but found it too well guarded to admit of a the enemy was safely behind his works about Knoxville, except his cavalry under General Sanders andth and extending some miles down south. At Knoxville the plateau is one hundred and twenty feet aLenoir's he left General Parke in command at Knoxville, and he and Captain Poe, of the engineers, g[11 more...]
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