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Amelia Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
, and after passing a few remarks offered a cigar, which was gratefully received. The first step under capitulation was to deliver to the Union army some fifteen hundred prisoners, taken since we left Petersburg, not all of them by my infantry, Rosser's and Mumford's cavalry having taken more than half of them. Besides these I delivered to General Grant all of the Confederate soldiers left under my care by General Lee, except about two hundred lost in the affairs about Petersburg, Amelia Court-House, Jetersville, Rice's Station, and Cumberland Church. None were reported killed except the gallant officers Brigadier-General Dearing, of Rosser's cavalry, Colonel Bostan, of Mumford's cavalry, and Major Thompson, of Stuart's horse artillery, in the desperate and gallant fight to which they were ordered against the bridge-burning party. General Grant's artillery prepared to fire a salute in honor of the surrender, but he ordered it stopped. As the world continues to look at and
Prospect, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
o the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia; but as far as your proposal may affect the Confederate States forces under my command and tend to the restoration of peace, I should be pleased to meet you at ten A. M. to-morrow on the old stage road to Richmond, between the picket lines of the two armies. R. E. Lee, General. The enemy's movements of the day were impressive of his desire to get by our left flank and make a strong stand across the route of our head of column. At Prospect Station, General Sheridan was informed of four trains of cars at Appomattox Station loaded with provisions for General Lee's army. He gave notice to Merritt's and Crook's cavalry, and rode twenty-eight miles in time for Custer's division to pass the station, cut off the trains, and drive back the guard advancing to protect them. He helped himself to the provisions, and captured besides twenty-five pieces of artillery and a wagon and hospital train. At night General Lee made his Headquarte
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 43
ring a note to General Lee: Headquarters Armies of the United States, 5 P. M., April 7, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding Confederate States Army: General,-- The results of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resista S. Grant, Lieutenant-General, Commanding Armies of the United States. I was sitting at his side when the note was deliveral. Lieutenant-General Grant, Commanding Armies of the United States. I was not informed of the contents of the return nder,-- April 8, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding Confederate States Army: General,-- Your note of last evening in rep for taking up arms again against the government of the United States until properly exchanged. I will meet you, or will desVirginia; but as far as your proposal may affect the Confederate States forces under my command and tend to the restoration n ride his chief of ordnance reported a large amount of United States currency in his possession. In doubt as to the proper
Jetersville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
ng a few remarks offered a cigar, which was gratefully received. The first step under capitulation was to deliver to the Union army some fifteen hundred prisoners, taken since we left Petersburg, not all of them by my infantry, Rosser's and Mumford's cavalry having taken more than half of them. Besides these I delivered to General Grant all of the Confederate soldiers left under my care by General Lee, except about two hundred lost in the affairs about Petersburg, Amelia Court-House, Jetersville, Rice's Station, and Cumberland Church. None were reported killed except the gallant officers Brigadier-General Dearing, of Rosser's cavalry, Colonel Bostan, of Mumford's cavalry, and Major Thompson, of Stuart's horse artillery, in the desperate and gallant fight to which they were ordered against the bridge-burning party. General Grant's artillery prepared to fire a salute in honor of the surrender, but he ordered it stopped. As the world continues to look at and study the grand
Sailor's Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
ployed into line, stacked their arms, folded their colors, and walked empty-handed to find their distant, blighted homes. There were surrendered and paroled on the last day of our military history over twenty-eight thousand officers and men,--viz.: General Lee and staff15 Longstreet's corps Including the parts of the Third Corps attached after the fall of A. P. Hill, and about five thousand that reported on the 7th, 8th, and 9th in bands and squads from the columns broken up at Sailor's Creek.14,833 Gordon's corps Including five thousand two hundred of fragments dispersed at Petersburg and during the rearward march, that joined us in retreat.7,200 Ewell's corps287 Cavalry corps1,786 Artillery2,586 Detachments1,649 Total28,356 In glancing backward over the period of the war, and the tremendous and terrible events with which it was fraught, the reflection irresistibly arises, that it might perhaps have been avoided and without dishonor. The flag and the fame of th
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 43
Chapter 43: Appomattox. Some of General Lee's officers say to him that further resistance is hopeless Longstreet does not approve General Grant calls for surrender-not yet the Confederate chieftain asks terms his response to his officers as represented by General Pendleton correspondence of Generals Lee and Grant morning of April 9 General Lee rides to meet the Federal commander, while Longstreet forms the last line of battle Longstreet endeavors to recall his chief, hearineached a large white-oak tree, where he dismounted to make his last Headquarters, and finally talked a little. The shock was most severe upon Field's division. Seasoned by four years of battle triumphant, the veterans in that body stood at Appomattox when the sun rose on the 9th day of April, 1865, as invincible of valor as on the morning of the 31st of August, 1862, after breaking up the Union lines of the second field of Manassas. They had learned little of the disasters about Petersburg
James Thompson (search for this): chapter 43
, not all of them by my infantry, Rosser's and Mumford's cavalry having taken more than half of them. Besides these I delivered to General Grant all of the Confederate soldiers left under my care by General Lee, except about two hundred lost in the affairs about Petersburg, Amelia Court-House, Jetersville, Rice's Station, and Cumberland Church. None were reported killed except the gallant officers Brigadier-General Dearing, of Rosser's cavalry, Colonel Bostan, of Mumford's cavalry, and Major Thompson, of Stuart's horse artillery, in the desperate and gallant fight to which they were ordered against the bridge-burning party. General Grant's artillery prepared to fire a salute in honor of the surrender, but he ordered it stopped. As the world continues to look at and study the grand combinations and strategy of General Grant, the higher will be his award as a great soldier. Confederates should be foremost in crediting him with all that his admirers so justly claim, and ask at
sand two hundred of fragments dispersed at Petersburg and during the rearward march, that joined us in retreat.7,200 Ewell's corps287 Cavalry corps1,786 Artillery2,586 Detachments1,649 Total28,356 In glancing backward over the period of the war, and the tremendous and terrible events with which it was fraught, the reflection irresistibly arises, that it might perhaps have been avoided and without dishonor. The flag and the fame of the nation could have suffered no reproach had General Scott's advice, before the outbreak, been followed,--Wayward sisters, depart in peace. The Southern States would have found their way back to the Union without war far earlier than they did by war. The reclaiming bonds would then have been those only of love, and the theory of government formulated by George Washington would have experienced no fracture. But the inflexible fiat of fate seemingly went forth for war; and so for four long years the history of this great nation was written in th
George Washington (search for this): chapter 43
ts dispersed at Petersburg and during the rearward march, that joined us in retreat.7,200 Ewell's corps287 Cavalry corps1,786 Artillery2,586 Detachments1,649 Total28,356 In glancing backward over the period of the war, and the tremendous and terrible events with which it was fraught, the reflection irresistibly arises, that it might perhaps have been avoided and without dishonor. The flag and the fame of the nation could have suffered no reproach had General Scott's advice, before the outbreak, been followed,--Wayward sisters, depart in peace. The Southern States would have found their way back to the Union without war far earlier than they did by war. The reclaiming bonds would then have been those only of love, and the theory of government formulated by George Washington would have experienced no fracture. But the inflexible fiat of fate seemingly went forth for war; and so for four long years the history of this great nation was written in the blood of its strong men.
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 43
it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate army known as the Army of Northern Virginia. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General, Commanding Armies of the United States. I was sitting at his side when the note was delivered. He read it and handed it to me without referring to its contents. After reading it I gave it back, saying, Not yet. Gr will designate officers to meet any officers you might name for the same purpose, at any point agreeable to you, for the purpose of arranging definitely the terms upon which the surrender of the Army.of Northern Virginia will be received. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. In reply, General Lee wrote,-- April 8, 1865. General,-- I received at a late hour your note of to-day. In mine of yesterday I did not intend to propose the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, but to ask the
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