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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
e plan, but balky troops will mar the strongest plans. He tries to persuade himself that he intended to join our battle on the Williamsburg road, but there was no fight in his heart after his maladroit encounter with Sedgwick's division on the afternoon of the 31st. The opportunity for enfilade fire of his artillery along the enemy's battle front, at the morning opening and all of the forenoon, was waiting him; while reports of the enemy crossing the river, reinforcing against my single contest, were demanding relief and aid. He reported sick on the 2d and left the army. When ready for duty he was assigned about Richmond and the seaboard of North Carolina. He applied to be restored to command of his division in the field, but the authorities thought his services could be used better elsewhere. He resigned his commission in the Confederate service, went to Georgia, and joined Joe Brown's militia, where he found congenial service, better suited to his ideas of vigorous warfare.
Seven Pines (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
les road. At the first quiet of our battle, after the left wing quit the field, I ordered the brigades withdrawn to defensive position about the trenches at Seven Pines, but before the order reached the front the fight was renewed by Hooker's division upon Wilcox and Pryor, and reached out to our left near Fair Oaks. In the heure the last one of these Virginians. Just then the Virginians rose and opened a fearful fire that drove him back to his bushy cover, which ended the battle of Seven Pines. Pickett was withdrawn to position assigned for his brigade, our line of skirmishers remaining near the enemy's during the day and night. General Wilcox repore afternoon of the 1st. It is possible, as our battle was in the heavy forest and swamp tangles. General Smith has written a great deal about the battle of Seven Pines during the past twenty or thirty years, in efforts to show that the failure of success was due to want of conduct on the part of the forces on the Williamsburg
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
g, reported the work of the commands on the Williamsburg road on the 31st, and asked for part of theested that we could renew the battle on the Williamsburg road, provided we would send him one of ourd, and Mahone occupied the line between the Williamsburg road and the railroad. Pickett's brigade t was moving to the rear, but battle on the Williamsburg road steadily advanced, with orders to devers, and were forwarded to my command on the Williamsburg road and gave us some concern. Failing to g over and concentrating against us on the Williamsburg road. He repeated, too, his wish to have h, and, with General Smith, came over to the Williamsburg road. A similar proposition was made Generty minutes. General Holmes marched down the Williamsburg road and rested in wait for General Lee. Ls back to their former lines. Those on the Williamsburg road were drawn back during the night, the of conduct on the part of the forces on the Williamsburg road. He claims that he was only out as a [1 more...]
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
plan, but balky troops will mar the strongest plans. He tries to persuade himself that he intended to join our battle on the Williamsburg road, but there was no fight in his heart after his maladroit encounter with Sedgwick's division on the afternoon of the 31st. The opportunity for enfilade fire of his artillery along the enemy's battle front, at the morning opening and all of the forenoon, was waiting him; while reports of the enemy crossing the river, reinforcing against my single contest, were demanding relief and aid. He reported sick on the 2d and left the army. When ready for duty he was assigned about Richmond and the seaboard of North Carolina. He applied to be restored to command of his division in the field, but the authorities thought his services could be used better elsewhere. He resigned his commission in the Confederate service, went to Georgia, and joined Joe Brown's militia, where he found congenial service, better suited to his ideas of vigorous warfare.
Seven Pines (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 8: Sequels of Seven Pines. The forces under command of G. W. Smith after Johnston was wounded the battle of the 1st Longstreet requests reinforcements and a diversion Council held McLaws alone sustains Longstreet's opposition to retiring severe fighting Pickett's brave stand General Lee assigned to command he orders the withdrawal of the army criticism of General Smith Confederates should not have lost the battle Keyes's corroboration. Major-General G. W. Smith was of the highest standing of the West Point classes, and, like others of the Engineers, had a big name to help him in the position to which he had been suddenly called by the incapacitation of the Confederate commander. I found his Headquarters at one o'clock in the morning, reported the work of the commands on the Williamsburg road on the 31st, and asked for part of the troops ordered up by General Johnston, that we might resume battle at daylight. He was disturbed by reports of pontoon
Oliver O. Howard (search for this): chapter 8
the practice of our batteries on the Nine Miles road. Our infantry moved steadily, engaging French's brigade of Richardson's division, which was led by one of Howard's regiments. French was supported by Howard's brigade, and Howard by Meagher's, and the firing extended along my line as far as the return front of my right. BuHoward's brigade, and Howard by Meagher's, and the firing extended along my line as far as the return front of my right. But Magruder was not on the field to seize the opportunity for his artillery. He was nowhere near the battle,--had not been called. General Whiting, however, saw the opportunity so inviting, and reported to his commander at half after six o'clock,-- 1 am going to try a diversion for Longstreet, and have found, as reported, a Howard by Meagher's, and the firing extended along my line as far as the return front of my right. But Magruder was not on the field to seize the opportunity for his artillery. He was nowhere near the battle,--had not been called. General Whiting, however, saw the opportunity so inviting, and reported to his commander at half after six o'clock,-- 1 am going to try a diversion for Longstreet, and have found, as reported, a position for artillery. The enemy are in full view and in heavy masses. I have ordered up Lee with four pieces. The musketry firing in advance is tremendous. Smith's War Papers. General Smith had parties posted along the heights of the Chickahominy in close observation of the movements of the enemy's forces on the east bank.
John Sedgwick (search for this): chapter 8
nd fine for artillery practice. The field fronting on the railroad was so shut in by heavy pine forest and tangled swamp that we had no place for a single gun. D. H. Hill's division was in reserve near the Casey encampment. The enemy stood: Sedgwick's division in front of Smith; Richardson's division in column of three brigades parallel to the railroad and behind it, prepared to attack my left; on Richardson's left was Birney's brigade behind the railroad, and under the enemy's third intrenements of success were in the plan, but balky troops will mar the strongest plans. He tries to persuade himself that he intended to join our battle on the Williamsburg road, but there was no fight in his heart after his maladroit encounter with Sedgwick's division on the afternoon of the 31st. The opportunity for enfilade fire of his artillery along the enemy's battle front, at the morning opening and all of the forenoon, was waiting him; while reports of the enemy crossing the river, reinforc
James E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 8
ed and the attack continued, and the question was reconsidered, and I was sent to learn your views. Ibid. Before General McLaws found me, I wrote General Smith,-- Can you reinforce me The entire enemy seems to be opposed to me. We cannot hold out unless we get help. If we can fight together, we can finish the work to-day, and Mac's time will be up. If I cannot get help, I fear that I must fall back. General McLaws reported of his ride to my lines,--I went and found you with J. E. B. Stuart. You were in favor of resuming the assault, and wanted five thousand men. Letter from General McLaws. Nothing was sent in reply to McLaws's report, but we soon learned that the left wing of the army was quiet and serene in defensive positions about the New Bridge fork of the Nine Miles road. At the first quiet of our battle, after the left wing quit the field, I ordered the brigades withdrawn to defensive position about the trenches at Seven Pines, but before the order reached
Edwin V. Sumner (search for this): chapter 8
ly out as a party of observation, to prevent reinforcement of the enemy from the east side of the river, and that he kept Sumner off of us. But he waited three hours after the enemy's ranks and lines had been broken, instead of moving with and finishing the battle, thus giving Sumner time to march from the east of the river, and strike him and beat him to disorder, and change the lost battle to success. He shows that Hill's and Longstreet's divisions could have gained the battle unaided,--whichrd work to reach the enemy's third line, we could have captured it in the second hour and had the field cleaned up before Sumner crossed the river. General Keyes, the commander of the Fourth Corps, in his Fifty years observations, says,--The left so important as prompt and vigorous work. If the battle had opened at sunrise, Smith would have made the same wait, and Sumner's march would have been in time to beat him. All elements of success were in the plan, but balky troops will mar the stro
John B. Hood (search for this): chapter 8
in the gray of the morning for Confederate troops and fired upon. This made some confusion with our new troops, and part of them opened fire in the wrong direction, putting two or three bullets through General Hill's tent before he got out of it. Hood's brigade of Smith's division, the pivotal point, came under this fire, and was immediately withdrawn. Hood reported his position good, but his orders were to retire. Our cavalry had established communication with headquarters, and gave prompHood reported his position good, but his orders were to retire. Our cavalry had established communication with headquarters, and gave prompt notice of movements as they occurred. The pivot was moving to the rear, but battle on the Williamsburg road steadily advanced, with orders to develop the enemy's battle front through its extent along the railroad; not to make the fancied wheel, but to expose his line to the practice of our batteries on the Nine Miles road. Our infantry moved steadily, engaging French's brigade of Richardson's division, which was led by one of Howard's regiments. French was supported by Howard's brigade,
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