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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia. Search the whole document.

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Brussels (Belgium) (search for this): chapter 3
ull leaf, and the rose-bushes, in bright bloom, are borne down by the snow. Our poor soldiers! What are they to do to-night, without shelter, and without blankets? Everybody seems to be doing what they can to supply their wants; many persons are having carpets made into soldiers' blankets. My brother J. told me that he had every chamber carpet in the house, except one, converted into coverlets; and this is by no means a singular instance. A number of coverlets, made of the most elegant Brussels carpeting, were sent by Mr. B., of Halifax County, the other day, to our hospital, with a request to Miss T. that blankets should be given from the hospital to the camp, as more easily transported from place to place, and the carpeting retained in the hospital. This was immediately done. The blankets that could be spared from private houses were given last winter. How it gladdens my heart when I see that a vessel has run the blockade, and arrived safely at some Southern port, laden with
Dranesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
of us until he saw us under J's care. We immediately applied at the office for our expected telegram; but it was not there. As it was Christmas-day, the office was closed at a very early hour, which seemed to me a strange arrangement, considering the state of the country. J. felt no uneasiness about his father, but was greatly disappointed, as he had expected to pass that day with him. I had heard in Winchester that my nephew, W. B. Phelps, had been wounded in the unfortunate fight at Dranesville, and felt great uneasiness about him; but J. had seen persons directly from Centreville, who reported him slightly wounded. This relieved my mind, but it was most unfortunate; for, had I known the truth, I should have gone on the return train to Manassas, and thence to Centreville, for the purpose of nursing him. We spent Christmas-day at the hotel, and dined with a number of soldiers. In the afternoon we were very much gratified to meet with the family of our neighbour, Captain J. The
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
ier-boy. Poor child, he is very ill! February 27th, 1862. Nothing new or important in our army. We were relieved to hear that the number who surrendered at Donelson was not so great as at first reported; the true number is 1,000, which is too many for us to lose! I trust they may be kindly treated. I know that we have friends at the North, but will they dare to be friendly openly? Oh, I hope they may have mercy on our prisoners! We have had some hope of recognition by France and England, but they still look on with folded arms. March 3, 1862. Last Friday was the third day appointed by our President as a day of fasting and prayer within nine months. The churches were filled to overflowing, with, I trust, heart-worshippers, and I believe that God, in his great mercy, will direct our Government and our army. March 4th, 1862. In statu quo as far as our armies are concerned. The Nashville, a Confederate steamer, that has been watched by eight Federal war vessels,
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e are suffering great uneasiness about the country. The enemy is attacking Roanoke Island furiously. General Wise is there, and will do all that can be done; but fN. and Brother J. awaiting us. They are very anxious and apprehensive about Roanoke Island. Monday night, February 10, 1862. Still greater uneasiness about RoanRoanoke Island. It is so important to us — is said to be the key to Norfolk; indeed, to all Eastern North Carolina, and Southeastern Virginia. We dread to-morrow's pape own expense, which was a real relief to my feelings. No good news from Roanoke Island. Fort Henry has fallen; that loss is treated lightly, but the enemy have tu free access into the heart of Tennessee. Tuesday, February 11, 1862. Roanoke Island has fallen — no particulars heard. February 12th, 1862. The loss of RRoanoke Island is a terrible blow. The loss of life not very great. The Richmond Blues were captured, and their Captain, the gifted and brave 0. Jennings Wise, is a
France (France) (search for this): chapter 3
little soldier-boy. Poor child, he is very ill! February 27th, 1862. Nothing new or important in our army. We were relieved to hear that the number who surrendered at Donelson was not so great as at first reported; the true number is 1,000, which is too many for us to lose! I trust they may be kindly treated. I know that we have friends at the North, but will they dare to be friendly openly? Oh, I hope they may have mercy on our prisoners! We have had some hope of recognition by France and England, but they still look on with folded arms. March 3, 1862. Last Friday was the third day appointed by our President as a day of fasting and prayer within nine months. The churches were filled to overflowing, with, I trust, heart-worshippers, and I believe that God, in his great mercy, will direct our Government and our army. March 4th, 1862. In statu quo as far as our armies are concerned. The Nashville, a Confederate steamer, that has been watched by eight Federal wa
Georgetown (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
for the wounding of General Hooker, they would have driven us into the Potomac! September 25th, 1862. The tables were turned on Saturday, as we succeeded in driving a good many of them into the Potomac. Ten thousand Yankees crossed at Shepherdstown, but unfortunately for them, they found the glorious Stonewall there. A fight ensued at Boteler's Mill, in which General Jackson totally routed General Pleasanton and his command. The account of the Yankee slaughter is fearful. As they wer around them; they are busily engaged nursing the wounded; hospitals are established in Winchester, Berryville, and other places. Letters from my nephews, W. B. N. and W. N. The first describes the fights of Boonesborough, Sharpsburg, and Shepherdstown. He says the first of these was the severest hand-to-hand cavalry fight of the war. All were terrific. W. speaks of his feelings the day of the surrender of Harper's Ferry. As they were about to charge the enemy's intrenchments, he felt as
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
you and all his soldiers to follow his example. September 12, 1862. No news from the army, except a letter in the morning's paper speaking of General Lee's being pleased with his reception in Maryland, and that our troops are foraging in Pennsylvania. I hope so; I like the idea of our army subsisting on the enemy; they certainly have subsisted on us enough to be willing that we should return the compliment. Took leave of our nephew, B. H. M., this morning; he has been here on sick-leave,ival of large reinforcements to the enemy, he had fallen back to Cumberland Gap. These victories without permanent results do us no good, and so much blood is spilled. There seems to be a revolution going on at the North. Ohio, Indiana, and Pennsylvania have given the Democrats a large majority for Congress! So may it be! November 4, 1862. A letter from my dear S. at Winchester. She says she is wearing herself down in the Confederate service; but there are so many soldiers in the hosp
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ntry cannot spare her chivalric sons. Monday night, September 22d, 1862. Probably the most desperate battle of the war was fought last Wednesday near Sharpsburg, Maryland. Great loss on both sides. The Yankees claim a great victory, while our men do the same. We were left in possession of the field on Wednesday night, anls are established in Winchester, Berryville, and other places. Letters from my nephews, W. B. N. and W. N. The first describes the fights of Boonesborough, Sharpsburg, and Shepherdstown. He says the first of these was the severest hand-to-hand cavalry fight of the war. All were terrific. W. speaks of his feelings the day ofingularly blessed. Can this last, when we have so many exposed to danger? O, God, spare our sons! Our friend, Dr. T., of this neighbourhood, lost two sons at Sharpsburg! Poor old gentleman! it is so sad to see his deeply-furrowed, resigned face. McClellan's troops were very well-behaved while in this neighbourhood; they t
Pea Ridge, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
r; but this is glory enough for one day, for which we will thank God and take courage. March 13th, 1862. Our hearts are overwhelmed to-day with our private grief. Our connection, Gen. James McIntosh, has fallen in battle. It was at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, on the 7th, while making a dashing cavalry charge. He had made one in which he was entirely successful, but seeing the enemy reforming, he exclaimed, We must charge again. My men, who will follow me? He then dashed off, followed by hisew gradually worse, and was dying, when a telegram came to General McIntosh from General Price, Come at once — a battle is imminent. He did not hesitate; the next steamer bore him from his dying child and sorrowing wife to the field of battle, Pea Ridge. He wrote to her, immediately on his arrival at camp, the most beautifully resigned letter, full of sorrow for her and for his child, but expressing the most noble, Christian sentiments. Oh, how she treasures it! The lovely boy died the day
St. Paul (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Fort Henry, on Tennessee River, has been attacked. We went to St. James's this morning, and St. Paul's tonight. When we returned we found Mr. N. and Brother J. awaiting us. They are very anxious ht of his father and family, and of his bleeding country, which could not spare him. We went to St. Paul's, and heard an excellent sermon from the Rev. Mr. Quintard, a chaplain in the army. He wore tden. Ash-Wednesday, March 5, 1862. This morning Dr. Wilmer gave us a delightful sermon at St. Paul's. He will be consecrated to-morrow Bishop of Alabama. To-night Bishop Elliott of Georgia prea What does it all portend? We are intensely anxious; our conversation, while busily sewing at St. Paul's Lecture-Room, is only of war. We hear of so many horrors committed by the enemy in the Valleyf startling reports set afloat by idlers. The Bishop preached and administered confirmation at St. Paul's. The President was a candidate for confirmation, but was detained by business. It is such a
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