hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Washington (United States) 171 1 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 168 2 Browse Search
Robert Anderson 122 2 Browse Search
United States (United States) 114 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 114 0 Browse Search
Robert Patterson 105 1 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 102 2 Browse Search
Robert N. Scott 101 1 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 94 0 Browse Search
Irvin McDowell 88 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion. Search the whole document.

Found 279 total hits in 74 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Vienna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
dvance very slow. The first was the want of practice in marching. They stopped every moment to pick blackberries or get water, says McDowell; they would not keep in the ranks, order as much as you pleased; when they came where water was fresh, they would pour the old water out of their canteens, and fill them with fresh water; they were not used to denying themselves much; they were not used to journeys on foot. The second cause was, perhaps, yet more potent. The affair of Big Bethel and Vienna had created a great outcry against rushing into places that people did not know anything about. I think the idea of every one was that we were to go into no such things as that — that we were to feel our way, again says McDowell. Precaution on this point was particularly emphasized in his instructions. The three following things, says his marching order, will not be pardonable in any commander: 1st, to come upon a battery or breastwork without a knowledge of its position; 2d, to be surpri
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
that the Government ought not to engage in any military undertakings with the three months volunteers, beyond those to which these forces had been already assigned and distributed, namely: to protect Washington and fortify Arlington Heights; to garrison Fort Monroe and, if chance should offer, recapture the Gosport Navy Yard at Norfolk; to hold Baltimore and Maryland; to prosecute Patterson's campaign against Harper's Ferry; to recover West Virginia through McClellan's campaign; to guard the Ohio line, and control Kentucky and Missouri. Larger and more distant operations, he believed, ought to be undertaken only with new armies formed of the three years volunteers, giving the summer to drill and preparation, and entering on combined movements in the favorable autumn weather. Important reasons, partly military, partly political, conflicted with so deliberate a programme. As events had shaped themselves, it seemed necessary to aid Patterson. The possibility that Beauregard and Jo
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
vernor Letcher called into service; and the earliest levies of Northern Virginia were posted at Manassas Junction, where railroads from Richmond, from Alexandria, and from the Shenandoah Valley met. On examination, its strategical value was found to be much greater than was suspected at the beginning; Colonel Cocke, the local commander, first pointed out to Lee its important relation to the Shenandoah Valley. These two columns, he writes, under date of May 15th, one at Manassas and one at Winchester, could readily co-operate and concentrate upon the one point or the other, either to make head against the enemy's columns advancing down the valley, should he force Harper's Ferry; or, in ease we repulse him at Harper's Ferry, the Winchester supporting column could throw itself on this side of the mountains, to co-operate with the column at Manassas. With the great increase of Federal troops at Washington, and their seizure of Alexandria and Arlington Heights, the post at Manassas Junc
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
. It was posted as a support for Ewell. Johnston's Army of the Shenandoah consisted of Jackson's brigade of five regiments, posted as a support for Bonham; and Bee's brigade of four regiments, posted as a support for Cocke. These had arrived and were in camp on the morning of the battle (July 21st). Beauregard reports their round numbers, ready for action, at 6,000 men and 20 guns. In addition, there arrived at Manassas about noon, and on the battle-field between two and four o'clock, Fisher's Sixth North Carolina, 634, and Kirby Smith's brigade (afterward led by Elzey), of 1,700 men and 2 guns; and also Hill's Virginia Regiment, 550. Recapitulation:Men.Guns. Beauregard's army21,83329 Johnston's army8,88422 Holmes' brigade1,3556 Totals32,07257 To which may be added sundry detachments, the numbers of which are not given in official reports. It was McDowell's intention to turn this position on the South. To conceal his purpose, and create the impression of a contempl
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
he one point or the other, either to make head against the enemy's columns advancing down the valley, should he force Harper's Ferry; or, in ease we repulse him at Harper's Ferry, the Winchester supporting column could throw itself on this side of thHarper's Ferry, the Winchester supporting column could throw itself on this side of the mountains, to co-operate with the column at Manassas. With the great increase of Federal troops at Washington, and their seizure of Alexandria and Arlington Heights, the post at Manassas Junction became of such prominence and importance, that Berecapture the Gosport Navy Yard at Norfolk; to hold Baltimore and Maryland; to prosecute Patterson's campaign against Harper's Ferry; to recover West Virginia through McClellan's campaign; to guard the Ohio line, and control Kentucky and Missouri. Lbels at Manassas, according to Beauregard's report. Before the design could take final shape, Johnston had evacuated Harper's Ferry, and Patterson's first movement was thereby terminated. This occurred about the middle of June. From that time o
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
with troops on the line of Bull Run, and for this he was urgent in demanding large reinforcements. As has been already mentioned, it was General Scott's opinion that the Government ought not to engage in any military undertakings with the three months volunteers, beyond those to which these forces had been already assigned and distributed, namely: to protect Washington and fortify Arlington Heights; to garrison Fort Monroe and, if chance should offer, recapture the Gosport Navy Yard at Norfolk; to hold Baltimore and Maryland; to prosecute Patterson's campaign against Harper's Ferry; to recover West Virginia through McClellan's campaign; to guard the Ohio line, and control Kentucky and Missouri. Larger and more distant operations, he believed, ought to be undertaken only with new armies formed of the three years volunteers, giving the summer to drill and preparation, and entering on combined movements in the favorable autumn weather. Important reasons, partly military, partly
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
tageous frontier to meet the expected Union advance from Washington. This, as previously related, had already seized upon Aanassas. With the great increase of Federal troops at Washington, and their seizure of Alexandria and Arlington Heights, ents intended to annihilate the Union armies and capture Washington; liable, however, to the objection, noted thereon by Jeeen already assigned and distributed, namely: to protect Washington and fortify Arlington Heights; to garrison Fort Monroe aal of Virginia; it saw a numerous Union army gathered at Washington; the newspapers raised the cry of On to Richmond; and thtress Monroe had met a repulse at Great Bethel, and near Washington a railroad-train under General Schenck had run into an acements; nevertheless, the strength of the Union army at Washington was such that it seemed entirely possible to provide eve Manassas Junction lies thirty-five miles southwest of Washington, on a high, open plateau; there the rebels had some slig
Stone Bridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
now to over twenty thousand, was posted at the various fords of Bull Run, in a line some eight miles long, and extending from the Manassas Railroad to the Stone Bridge on the Warrenton turnpike. At Union Mills Ford, Ewell's brigade of three regiments; at McLean's Ford, Jones' brigade of three regiments; at Blackburn's Ford, Longstreet's brigade of five regiments; above Mitchell's Ford, Bonham's brigade of five regiments; at Lewis' Ford, Cocke's brigade of portions of six regiments; at Stone Bridge, Evans' demi-brigade of a regiment and a half; Early's brigade of four regiments was posted as a reserve in rear and support of Longstreet and Jones. All the above, together with some seven other regiments and portions, not brigaded, con-stituted Beauregard's Army of the Potomac. His official report states the total effective, on the morning of the battle (July 21st), to have been 21,833, and 29 guns, Holmes' brigade, an independent command ordered up from Acquia Creek, consisted of two
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
six regiments; at Stone Bridge, Evans' demi-brigade of a regiment and a half; Early's brigade of four regiments was posted as a reserve in rear and support of Longstreet and Jones. All the above, together with some seven other regiments and portions, not brigaded, con-stituted Beauregard's Army of the Potomac. His official report states the total effective, on the morning of the battle (July 21st), to have been 21,833, and 29 guns, Holmes' brigade, an independent command ordered up from Acquia Creek, consisted of two regiments, reported by Beauregard at a total of 1,355, and 6 guns. It was posted as a support for Ewell. Johnston's Army of the Shenandoah consisted of Jackson's brigade of five regiments, posted as a support for Bonham; and Bee's brigade of four regiments, posted as a support for Cocke. These had arrived and were in camp on the morning of the battle (July 21st). Beauregard reports their round numbers, ready for action, at 6,000 men and 20 guns. In addition, there
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
l Run, and for this he was urgent in demanding large reinforcements. As has been already mentioned, it was General Scott's opinion that the Government ought not to engage in any military undertakings with the three months volunteers, beyond those to which these forces had been already assigned and distributed, namely: to protect Washington and fortify Arlington Heights; to garrison Fort Monroe and, if chance should offer, recapture the Gosport Navy Yard at Norfolk; to hold Baltimore and Maryland; to prosecute Patterson's campaign against Harper's Ferry; to recover West Virginia through McClellan's campaign; to guard the Ohio line, and control Kentucky and Missouri. Larger and more distant operations, he believed, ought to be undertaken only with new armies formed of the three years volunteers, giving the summer to drill and preparation, and entering on combined movements in the favorable autumn weather. Important reasons, partly military, partly political, conflicted with so d
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...