hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Washington (United States) 171 1 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 168 2 Browse Search
Robert Anderson 122 2 Browse Search
United States (United States) 114 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 114 0 Browse Search
Robert Patterson 105 1 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 102 2 Browse Search
Robert N. Scott 101 1 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 94 0 Browse Search
Irvin McDowell 88 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion. Search the whole document.

Found 259 total hits in 48 results.

1 2 3 4 5
Stone Bridge (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
f considerable size and height, connecting the precipitous and rocky eastern bank of the stream with a broad piece of level bottomland on the west. The bridge was thought to be defended in force, and said to be prepared for blowing up. The engineers had information, however, that Sudley Ford, two or three miles above, could be readily carried and crossed by an attacking column. McDowell therefore ordered that Tyler, with the heaviest division, should advance from Centreville directly to Stone Bridge, three and a half miles distant, and make a feigned attack; while Hunter and Heintzelman should make a secret and circuitous night march northward, cross Sudley Ford, and, rapidly descending on the enemy's side of Bull Run, should clear away the batteries at the stone bridge by a rear attack, and thus enable Tyler's division to cross and join in the combined march on Gainesville, or continue the attack on Beauregard's left. If the stone bridge were blown up, the engineers had timbers re
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
om McDowell. It has been explained that the first rebel line was composed mainly of Johnston's troops. As they retreated up the hill south of Young's Branch, Jackson's brigade of five regiments, also of Johnston's army, was just arriving there on its way to guard the stone bridge, and only at that moment learning the true statk to about four companies, and the remaining fugitives were moving in hopeless panic down the Sudley road toward Manassas, spreading direful tidings of disaster. Jackson's line was rendered yet stronger by having Hampton's battalion — that morning arrived from Richmond — on its extreme right in the turnpike before the Robinson houung forward to the Warrenton turnpike; and while the rebel reports pass it over with the merest allusions, it seems probable that, like Hampton, other portions of Jackson's line were moved somewhat farther back, to find better shelter from the annoying fire of the Union batteries. This midday Union success seemed, and was, sweepin
Henry, Marshall County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
solved itself into a somewhat spasmodic and intermittent struggle on both sides. When, at about half-past 2 o'clock, the batteries of Ricketts and Griffin were ordered to move forward from the Dogan heights across the valley to the top of the Henry hill, they did so with the feeling that the two regiments ordered to follow and support them were tardy, inadequate, and unreliable. Other regiments, moving forward to the flank attack, could not well be observed, because of the uneven ground anys of the same rebel regiment, they fired their muskets, turned, and fled. These disabled batteries, visible to both armies, now became the centre and coveted prize of an irregular contest, which surged back and forth over the plateau of the Henry hill; but, whether because of confusion of orders, or the broken surface of the ground, or more probably the mere reciprocal eagerness of capture and rescue, the contest was carried on, not by the whole line, but by single regiments, or at most b
Centreville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 15: Bull Run. At Centreville, on Saturday night, McDowell called his officers together and announced to them his plan of battle for the following day. The Warrenton turnpike ran almost directly west from Centreville to Gainesville station on the railroad. He was yet unaware that Johnston had joined Beauregard, andherefore ordered that Tyler, with the heaviest division, should advance from Centreville directly to Stone Bridge, three and a half miles distant, and make a feignedimbers ready to repair it. The division of Miles should remain in reserve at Centreville, and the brigade of Richardson continue to threaten Blackburn's Ford. Ind; and since a practicable road from each of these five fords converged upon Centreville, he proposed a simultaneous advance and attack on the Union army, in its camauregard was yet waiting impatiently to hear that his right was advancing on Centreville, when, toward eleven o'clock, word came that, through a miscarriage of order
Franklin (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Union right, where at times friend became intermingled with foe, and where both sides took occasional prisoners near the same place. In this prolonged and wasteful struggle the Union strength was slowly and steadily consumed. Arnold's battery crossed the valley to the support of Griffin and Ricketts, but found itself obliged to again withdraw. The Rhode Island battery took part in the contest as well as it might from the hill north of Young's Branch. Brigade after brigadeSher-man's, Franklin's, Willcox's, and finally Howard's reserve, were brought forward-regiment after regiment was sent up the hill-three times the batteries were recovered and again lost. It speaks volumes for the courage of the raw, undisciplined volunteers, that, in the face of these repeated failures, they continued to go perseveringly against what seemed to them a hidden and unattainable barrier, until a stronger wave of rebel bullets or bayonets, surging suddenly forward in the pine thicket, would meet a
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
instinct of combat, formed a new line. His five regiments and two batteries, stretched from the Robinson to the Henry houses, formed a solid-looking protection, behind which some of the flying rebels gathered courage and rallied in little driblets. Bee's five regiments had shrunk to about four companies, and the remaining fugitives were moving in hopeless panic down the Sudley road toward Manassas, spreading direful tidings of disaster. Jackson's line was rendered yet stronger by having Hampton's battalion — that morning arrived from Richmond — on its extreme right in the turnpike before the Robinson house; and behind these, Bee's fragments were gathered into a sheltering ravine. At this period of the day, a little after noon, the advancing Union columns had their best co-operation and strongest momentum. Keyes' brigade was advancing on the left toward the Robinson hill. Sherman was moving diagonally across the centre of the morning's field. Porter's still aggressive brigad
Youngs Branch (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
the stone bridge. A little stream, called Young's Branch, also crosses both roads at this intersectiately north of the Warrenton turnpike and Young's Branch, his left resting on the Sudley road, withhis right, on the point of a hill south of Young's Branch. At ten o'clock Hunter's advance emer, entirely across and out of the valley of Young's Branch. But the advantage was not won without cotrue state of affairs. This hill south of Young's Branch was a higher and stronger position than thion. The two roads cross in the valley at Young's Branch, and from their crossing ascend gently to ght extended to where the hill descends to Young's Branch; their left reached nearly to the Sudley r from him, working its way southward along Young's Branch in the hope to make a flank attack on the tions in the valley along the turnpike and Young's Branch, mainly west of the intersection of the roas well as it might from the hill north of Young's Branch. Brigade after brigadeSher-man's, Frankli[1 more...]
Gainsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
n of battle for the following day. The Warrenton turnpike ran almost directly west from Centreville to Gainesville station on the railroad. He was yet unaware that Johnston had joined Beauregard, and sought to prevent such junction by seizing Gainesville. Beauregard's army lay in detachments behind Bull Run, at five different fords, along a line of eight miles. His left and northernmost flank was at the stone bridge where Warrenton turnpike crosses Bull Run, though Mc-Dowell supposed it to exght march northward, cross Sudley Ford, and, rapidly descending on the enemy's side of Bull Run, should clear away the batteries at the stone bridge by a rear attack, and thus enable Tyler's division to cross and join in the combined march on Gainesville, or continue the attack on Beauregard's left. If the stone bridge were blown up, the engineers had timbers ready to repair it. The division of Miles should remain in reserve at Centreville, and the brigade of Richardson continue to threaten B
Robinson (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ese, Bee's fragments were gathered into a sheltering ravine. At this period of the day, a little after noon, the advancing Union columns had their best co-operation and strongest momentum. Keyes' brigade was advancing on the left toward the Robinson hill. Sherman was moving diagonally across the centre of the morning's field. Porter's still aggressive brigade was pushing down the Sudley road. The compact brigades of Franklin and Willcox were coming to the front on the right. Moreover, Griffin's and Ricketts' batteries had obtained favorable positions near the Dogan house, with an enfilading fire against Hampton. Toward two o'clock two regiments of Keyes' brigade made a charge up the Robinson hill and drove Hampton out of the tangle of fences and hedges about the Robinson House, though newly planted rebel batteries farther to the rear made it impossible to hold the position. The whole Union line swung forward to the Warrenton turnpike; and while the rebel reports pass it ove
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 15: Bull Run. At Centreville, on Saturday night, McDowell called his officers together Beauregard's army lay in detachments behind Bull Run, at five different fords, along a line of eigstone bridge where Warrenton turnpike crosses Bull Run, though Mc-Dowell supposed it to extend to thnd, rapidly descending on the enemy's side of Bull Run, should clear away the batteries at the stone explained to him the character and course of Bull Run, and the situation of the five principal ford, and, returning, flows to the southeast into Bull Run. This was the destined battle-field. It one gun at his left, and the other some dis- Bull Run-battle of the forenoon. in these maps the yler led Sherman's and Keyes' brigades across Bull Run half a mile above, where the stream was fordaight, so as to give a partial cross-fire at Bull Run-battle of the afternoon. a distance of three ve thousand volunteers on the battle-field of Bull Run who had entirely lost their regimental organi
1 2 3 4 5