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Vienna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
arrenton turnpike and stone bridge and maintain free communication with Centreville. For this abundant resources were yet available. Burnside's brigade had remained in reserve on the morning's battle-field, and, after four hours rest, was yet capable of effective service. Keyes' brigade beyond the hill, on his left, was substantially unharmed. Schenck had an almost fresh brigade at the stone bridge. Miles had a brigade at Centreville, which could be replaced from Runyon's division near Vienna. The engineers had cleared away the abattis at the stone bridge. The hills north of the Warrenton turnpike were excellent defensive positions. It needed but morale among the troops to hold the battle-ground, and holding this would have compelled the enemy to retreat. Unfortunately the Union army had lost its morale. The mere disorder of the final repulse was slight; but the demoralization and loss of discipline had been growing during the whole afternoon, until, of a sudden, the army
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
was given to advance his brigade toward Stone Bridge, which he did, deploying it in line of battle across the Warrenton turnpike, half-way between Centreville and Cub Run. As soon as Johnston and Beauregard had sufficiently recovered from their astonishment at seeing the Union army in unmistakable retreat, they ordered pursuit ch were retreating around the long detour by way of Sudley Springs and Ford once more came in sight of the Warrenton turnpike, at a point between Stone Bridge and Cub Run. Cub Run seems to have been a difficult little stream, provided with a suspension bridge of some kind where the turnpike crosses it. Radford's cavalry had not onCub Run seems to have been a difficult little stream, provided with a suspension bridge of some kind where the turnpike crosses it. Radford's cavalry had not only been hovering along and occasionally dashing in on the turnpike, but a rebel light battery succeeded in establishing itself where it commanded the suspension bridge. When the retreating column from Sudley Ford came in sight, they found to their consternation that it was necessary to run the gauntlet of this artillery fire. The
Stone Bridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ved by the two brigades of Davies and Richardson to fall back on Centreville; while to Blenker the more judicious order was given to advance his brigade toward Stone Bridge, which he did, deploying it in line of battle across the Warrenton turnpike, half-way between Centreville and Cub Run. As soon as Johnston and Beauregard het of Bull Run Russell, wrote his description of the affair for European readers, after a leisurely lunch at Centreville, and a stroll of perhaps a mile toward Stone Bridge, taking his departure with the earliest fugitives. It also happened that on the afternoon of the battle a considerable number of provision, baggage, and amhe columns which were retreating around the long detour by way of Sudley Springs and Ford once more came in sight of the Warrenton turnpike, at a point between Stone Bridge and Cub Run. Cub Run seems to have been a difficult little stream, provided with a suspension bridge of some kind where the turnpike crosses it. Radford's cav
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
unknown to regular armies. Congress had met in special session; and senators and representatives, full of the patriotic hope and pride of their several States, no less than their own eager political solicitude, in several instances joined in what many rashly assumed would be a mere triumphal parade. McDowell's unopposed and apparently irresistible advance through the enemy's outposts lured them on to Centreville in a false security; and the uniformly favorable reports which went back to Washington even brought out a fresh accession of the same material on Sunday morning of the battle. By that time, however, the situation had become more serious, and generally made the non-combatants somewhat circumspect. Only a few of hardier courage followed to the battle-field; most of them remained at Centreville until the cannonade announced the beginning of the fight, and then drifted gradually down the turnpike toward the stone bridge, not nearer than a mile and a half to the actual fight
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
bridge and maintain free communication with Centreville. For this abundant resources were yet avait the stone bridge. Miles had a brigade at Centreville, which could be replaced from Runyon's divi road, making a comparatively easy march to Centreville. It also becomes necessary to mention hwas now near sundown. Miles, commanding at Centreville, either through illness or drunkenness, hades of Davies and Richardson to fall back on Centreville; while to Blenker the more judicious order ss the Warrenton turnpike, half-way between Centreville and Cub Run. As soon as Johnston and Be been sent down the Warrenton turnpike from Centreville, toward the stone bridge. When finally theapprehension lest McDowell should turn from Centreville and once more assail the Confederate light d his intention and orders were to rally at Centreville. But, arriving there, he found the conditi for that season — the last brigade reached Centreville, and the various commanders were called tog[9 more...]
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
d; these had with them, as yet, two batteries — a total of ten field-pieces; for only the batteries of Ricketts and Griffin were lost in the main battle. Sherman's brigade, on the other hand, marched eastward, over the ground of the morning's conflict, and recrossed Bull Run at the ford, half a mile above the stone bridge, by which they had approached. Keyes' brigade, becoming aware of the general retreat, also returned by that route. These two, with Schenck's brigade, soon reached the Warrenton road, making a comparatively easy march to Centreville. It also becomes necessary to mention here that, while the main battle of the afternoon was going on, a second engagement had been fought at Blackburn's Ford. The brigades of Richardson and of Davies were sent there in the morning, to make such demonstrations as would mask McDowell's real movement. In the afternoon, however, their purpose became apparent; and to relieve the stress of the main battle, the Confederate commander sen
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
afternoon, however, their purpose became apparent; and to relieve the stress of the main battle, the Confederate commander sent orders to Jones' brigade to cross Bull Run and make a demonstration. At about four o'clock, Jones, with his three regiments, crossed at McLean's Ford, and endeavored, by a flank movement, to capture Huntand most grotesquely confused accounts of the battle, first published in the newspapers. A famous correspondent of the London times, who earned the sobriquet of Bull Run Russell, wrote his description of the affair for European readers, after a leisurely lunch at Centreville, and a stroll of perhaps a mile toward Stone Bridge, tamore assail the Confederate light flank at or below Blackburn's Ford. To meet this reported danger, Ewell and Holmes were that night ordered post-haste back to Union Mills. You will not fail to remember, afterward wrote Jefferson Davis to Beauregard, that, so far from knowing the enemy was routed, a large part of our forces was m
ccasional manoeuvres of Schenck's and Keyes' brigades. In a certain sense they were under fire, because the long-range shells of the field-pieces rendered even that locality somewhat dangerous. From this situation were written many highly sensational, but purely imaginary and most grotesquely confused accounts of the battle, first published in the newspapers. A famous correspondent of the London times, who earned the sobriquet of Bull Run Russell, wrote his description of the affair for European readers, after a leisurely lunch at Centreville, and a stroll of perhaps a mile toward Stone Bridge, taking his departure with the earliest fugitives. It also happened that on the afternoon of the battle a considerable number of provision, baggage, and ammunition wagons, together with some private vehicles of the non-combatants heretofore mentioned, had been sent down the Warrenton turnpike from Centreville, toward the stone bridge. When finally the first wave of fugitives brought unfa
Carlisle, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
as overturned directly in the centre of the bridge, and the passage was completely obstructed. The enemy continued to play his artillery upon the train, carriages, ambulances, and artillery wagons that filled up the road, and these were reduced to ruin. The artillery could not possibly pass, and five pieces of the Rhode Island battery, which had been safely brought off the field, were here lost. The four pieces of Arnold's battery were also abandoned here from this cause. Four pieces of Carlisle's battery were apparently lost in the same neighborhood, though from a charge of Radford's cavalry. This suspension bridge over Cub Run was distant some three miles from the main battle-field, and it was here that the enemy made his largest capture of guns and wagons. It may be imagined that at Confederate headquarters that night the measure of satisfaction was well-nigh full. Yet that their rejoicing was tempered with a serious alloy of rebel danger and losses, is also clearly enough
Sudley Springs (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
of overwhelming defeat and pressing pursuit, and started a veritable scramble and stampede for safety. Arms and clothing were thrown away by those on foot; wagons were abandoned, and even ambulances with wounded soldiers left standing in the road, while the frightened teamsters rode away at headlong speed, on horses unhitched or cut out of their harness. It would seem that things had already come to this pass before the columns which were retreating around the long detour by way of Sudley Springs and Ford once more came in sight of the Warrenton turnpike, at a point between Stone Bridge and Cub Run. Cub Run seems to have been a difficult little stream, provided with a suspension bridge of some kind where the turnpike crosses it. Radford's cavalry had not only been hovering along and occasionally dashing in on the turnpike, but a rebel light battery succeeded in establishing itself where it commanded the suspension bridge. When the retreating column from Sudley Ford came in sigh
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