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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Chapter 3: the Confederate States' rebellion. On the fourth day of February, 1861, while the Peace Conference met in Washington to consider propositions of compromise and concession, the delegates of the seceding States convened in Montgomery, Ala., to combine and solidify the general conspiracy into an organized and avowed rebellion. Such action had been arranged and agreed upon from the beginning. The congressional manifesto from Washington, as far back as December 14th, advised thaWashington, as far back as December 14th, advised that we are satisfied the honor, safety, and independence of the Southern people require the organization of a Southern confederacy--a result to be obtained only by separate State secession. This agreement of the Washington caucus was steadily adhered to. The specious argument invented in Georgia, that we can make better terms outside of the Union than in it, and the public declaration of Mississippi's commissioner in Baltimore, that secession was not taken with the view of breaking up the present
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
independence of the Southern people require the organization of a Southern confederacy--a result to be obtained only by separate State secession. This agreement of the Washington caucus was steadily adhered to. The specious argument invented in Georgia, that we can make better terms outside of the Union than in it, and the public declaration of Mississippi's commissioner in Baltimore, that secession was not taken with the view of breaking up the present government, but to assure to her (Missisal dogma of State supremacy upon which they had built their revolt. The day after the rebel Congress adopted its provisional government, it elected (February 9, 1861) Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, President, and Alexander H. Stephens, of Georgia, Vice-President of the new Confederacy. The reported vote for Davis is unanimous; but it is historically related by Stephens that Howell Cobb and Robert Toombs were also aspirants, and that Davis himself preferred the chief command of the rebel
the essential elements of a high national career, continued he. The idea has been given out at the North, and even in the Border States, that we are too small and too weak to maintain a separate nationality. This is a great mistake. In extent of territory we embrace 564,000 square miles and upwards. This is upwards of 200,000 square miles more than was included within the limits of the original thirteen States. It is an area of country more than double the territory of France or the Austrian Empire. France, in round numbers, has but 212,000 square miles; Austria, in round numbers, has but 248,000 square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain, including England, Ireland, and Scotland together. In population we have upwards of 5,000,000, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original Thirteen States was less than 4,000,000 in
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
n Washington to consider propositions of compromise and concession, the delegates of the seceding States convened in Montgomery, Ala., to combine and solidify the general conspiracy into an organized and avowed rebellion. Such action had been arr points were arranged: 1st, the Cotton States should immediately secede; 2d, that delegates should be chosen to meet in Montgomery, to organize a confederacy, not later than February 15th; 3d, that the conspirators would remain in Congress as long as--some forecast of his policy, but they had been uniformly unsuccessful. Accordingly the secession delegates met in Montgomery on February 4th, instead of the 15th, as had been first arranged, and organized a provisional Congress, and a few days ; and if not completely satisfied, all acquiesced in the distribution of honors. Davis was sent for and inaugurated at Montgomery, on Monday, February 18th. In his inaugural address he intimated that they would permit the non-seceded Slave States t
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Chapter 3: the Confederate States' rebellion. On the fourth day of February, 1861, while the Peace Conference met in Washington to consider propositions of compromise and concession, the delegates of the seceding States convened in Montgomery, Congress, and a few days thereafter (February 8, 1861) adopted a provisional government, to be known as The Confederate States of America. There was little difficulty in arriving at this result; most if not all the seceders' State conventions had declared a wish that their proposed new government should be modelled on that of the United States. From this they proceeded to the work of framing a permanent constitution. This was a somewhat slower process, though it was also completed and the people. It provided that in newly acquired territory the institution of negro slavery, as it now exists in the Confederate States, shall be recognized and protected by Congress and by the Territorial Government ; also for the right of transit an
t of territory we embrace 564,000 square miles and upwards. This is upwards of 200,000 square miles more than was included within the limits of the original thirteen States. It is an area of country more than double the territory of France or the Austrian Empire. France, in round numbers, has but 212,000 square miles; Austria, in round numbers, has but 248,000 square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain, including England, Ireland, and Scotland together. In population we have upwards of 5,000,000, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original Thirteen States was less than 4,000,000 in 1790, and still less in 1776, when the independence of our fathers was achieved. If they, with a less population, dared maintain their independence against the greatest power on earth, shall we have any apprehension of maintaining ours now?
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 4
nt of territory we embrace 564,000 square miles and upwards. This is upwards of 200,000 square miles more than was included within the limits of the original thirteen States. It is an area of country more than double the territory of France or the Austrian Empire. France, in round numbers, has but 212,000 square miles; Austria, in round numbers, has but 248,000 square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain, including England, Ireland, and Scotland together. In population we have upwards of 5,000,000, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original Thirteen States was less than 4,000,000 in 1790, and still less in 1776, when the independence of our fathers was achieved. If they, with a less population, dared maintain their independence against the greatest power on earth, shall we have any apprehension of maintaining ours now?
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
onfederacy; but, beyond this, he continued, if I mistake not the judgment and will of the people, a reunion with the States from which we have separated is neither practicable nor desirable. If the remotest doubt remained, from previous indications and this official hint, that the whole purpose and animus of the revolt was the establishment of a powerful slaveocracy, that doubt was removed by the public declaration of Mr. Stephens, the new Vice-President. In a speech which he made at Savannah, Ga., on the 21st of March, he defined the ruling idea of the conspiracy in the following frank language: The prevailing ideas entertained by him (Jefferson) and most of the leading statesmen at the time of the formation of the old constitution, were that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically. It was an evil they knew not well how to deal with; but the general opinion of that day was, t
Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 4
ea has been given out at the North, and even in the Border States, that we are too small and too weak to maintain a separate nationality. This is a great mistake. In extent of territory we embrace 564,000 square miles and upwards. This is upwards of 200,000 square miles more than was included within the limits of the original thirteen States. It is an area of country more than double the territory of France or the Austrian Empire. France, in round numbers, has but 212,000 square miles; Austria, in round numbers, has but 248,000 square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain, including England, Ireland, and Scotland together. In population we have upwards of 5,000,000, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original Thirteen States was less than 4,000,000 in 1790, and still less in 1776, when the independence of our fathers was
France (France) (search for this): chapter 4
ards of 200,000 square miles more than was included within the limits of the original thirteen States. It is an area of country more than double the territory of France or the Austrian Empire. France, in round numbers, has but 212,000 square miles; Austria, in round numbers, has but 248,000 square miles. Ours is greater than boFrance, in round numbers, has but 212,000 square miles; Austria, in round numbers, has but 248,000 square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain, including England, Ireland, and Scotland together. In population we have upwards of 5,000,000, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original Thirteen States was lesFrance, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain, including England, Ireland, and Scotland together. In population we have upwards of 5,000,000, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original Thirteen States was less than 4,000,000 in 1790, and still less in 1776, when the independence of our fathers was achieved. If they, with a less population, dared maintain their independence against the greatest power on earth, shall we have any apprehension of maintaining ours now?
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