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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Sergeant Oats, Prison Life in Dixie: giving a short history of the inhuman and barbarous treatment of our soldiers by rebel authorities. Search the whole document.

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Campbellton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
enever a man showed himself about the bridge, we plugged him. The fire got under good headway, and we slipped up that ditch and ran to our horses, mounted, and made our best speed to overtake our conmand. We caught up just as morning began to dawn. As soon as it was light we halted to feed; but before our horses were half done eating, the rebels were upon us again. Knowing the country better than we did, they had crossed the river at another place, and dashed on to cut us off from Chattahoochee. We tried to make a stand, but they outnumbered us, and flanked us, and we were forced to save ourselves by flight. We came into the neighborhood of Newman, and found that eight thousand infantry were there prepared to receive us. With these fresh troops before us and Wheeler's cavalry behind us, we found ourselves in a fix. But worn out as we and our horses were, we charged, and fought our way to the right, and would have reached the Chattahoochee if we could have found a road.
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ewman. But curses, bitter and deep, were heaped on him on all sides. We broke up into squads, following our own regimental or company commanders, or, still worse, two or three old comrades swearing to live or die together, and going on their own hook. A good many of us stuck to Lieut.-Col. Kelley, and rode through the woods till we got into a piece of swampy ground near the river, where our horses mired. We dismounted. There I parted from Bombshell; a better mare never grew upon Kentucky bluegrass. We had fared together for a thousand miles, had drank and bathed in a hundred rivers. She had never known any other master, and I was more partner than master. I hope she died in that swamp, and that no Johnnie ever had her to show as a trophy of that chase, or rode her against that flag she had followed so long. Alas! poor Bombshell! She did not fully understand all the questions involved in the war, but she was a true soldier. Leaving our horses, we tried to get to the
y had crossed the river at another place, and dashed on to cut us off from Chattahoochee. We tried to make a stand, but they outnumbered us, and flanked us, and we were forced to save ourselves by flight. We came into the neighborhood of Newman, and found that eight thousand infantry were there prepared to receive us. With these fresh troops before us and Wheeler's cavalry behind us, we found ourselves in a fix. But worn out as we and our horses were, we charged, and fought our way to td have reached the Chattahoochee if we could have found a road. By this time we were demoralized. We had all lost confidence in McCook. I don't believe there was a man in the brigade that would have paid any attention to him after we passed Newman. But curses, bitter and deep, were heaped on him on all sides. We broke up into squads, following our own regimental or company commanders, or, still worse, two or three old comrades swearing to live or die together, and going on their own h
Edward McCook (search for this): chapter 3
ked us, and we were forced to save ourselves by flight. We came into the neighborhood of Newman, and found that eight thousand infantry were there prepared to receive us. With these fresh troops before us and Wheeler's cavalry behind us, we found ourselves in a fix. But worn out as we and our horses were, we charged, and fought our way to the right, and would have reached the Chattahoochee if we could have found a road. By this time we were demoralized. We had all lost confidence in McCook. I don't believe there was a man in the brigade that would have paid any attention to him after we passed Newman. But curses, bitter and deep, were heaped on him on all sides. We broke up into squads, following our own regimental or company commanders, or, still worse, two or three old comrades swearing to live or die together, and going on their own hook. A good many of us stuck to Lieut.-Col. Kelley, and rode through the woods till we got into a piece of swampy ground near the r
nything of our pursuers, and the hope that they had encamped for the night was struggling for a place in our minds; though, really, our knowledge of our pursuers (Wheeler's cavalry) gave us small room for hope. The night was warm; there was no wind, and a haze crept up, till the only stars visible were those near the zenith. ight. We came into the neighborhood of Newman, and found that eight thousand infantry were there prepared to receive us. With these fresh troops before us and Wheeler's cavalry behind us, we found ourselves in a fix. But worn out as we and our horses were, we charged, and fought our way to the right, and would have reached the ed with balls, and his rash deed came near causing the death of every one of us. Kill every---- --! cried a rebel officer in excitement. Just then we saw Wheeler and staff, and called to him. The Johnnies pointed to their dead officer and claimed treachery. But the General ordered them to guard us as prisoners, and not to
have found a road. By this time we were demoralized. We had all lost confidence in McCook. I don't believe there was a man in the brigade that would have paid any attention to him after we passed Newman. But curses, bitter and deep, were heaped on him on all sides. We broke up into squads, following our own regimental or company commanders, or, still worse, two or three old comrades swearing to live or die together, and going on their own hook. A good many of us stuck to Lieut.-Col. Kelley, and rode through the woods till we got into a piece of swampy ground near the river, where our horses mired. We dismounted. There I parted from Bombshell; a better mare never grew upon Kentucky bluegrass. We had fared together for a thousand miles, had drank and bathed in a hundred rivers. She had never known any other master, and I was more partner than master. I hope she died in that swamp, and that no Johnnie ever had her to show as a trophy of that chase, or rode her against