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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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mile south of the Augusta railroad around the north side of the city to the Chattanooga railroad. This line was well built, and capable of a tolerably good defense. It consisted of a system of open batteries for artillery connected by the usual infantry parapet, with all the accessories of abatis, chevaux-de-frise, &c. But it was evidently not the main line upon which the enemy relied for his final defense. July 22, the enemy evacuated the line referred to above during the night of the 21st, and we pressed forward on all the roads until the enemy was again found behind intrenchments. Reconnaissances proved that these were finally the main lines of defensive works covering Atlanta. They completely encircled the city at a distance of about one and a half miles from the center and consisted of a system of batteries open to the rear and connected by infantry parapet, with complete abatis, in some places in three and four rows, with rows of pointed stakes, and long lines of chevaux
ere held in reserve at Nashville. The staff organization of the engineer department with that army was as follows: Capt. O. M. Poe, U. S. Engineers, chief engineer Military Division of the Mississippi; Capt. C. B. Reese, Corps of Engineers, chief engineer Department and Army of the Tennessee; Capt. W. J. Twining, lieutenant of engineers, chief engineer Department and Army of the Ohio; Lieut. H. C. Wharton, Corps of Engineers, chief engineer Army of the Cumberland. Until the early part of May the duties of chief engineer Army of the Cumberland had been performed by Capt. W. E. Merrill, Corps of Engineers, but he having received authority to organize the regiment of Veteran Volunteer Engineers provided for by act of Congress, had gone to Chattanooga for that purpose. Early in July the following officers of the Corps of Engineers, who had just graduated at West Point, reported to me, and were assigned to duty as follows: Capt. J. W. Barlow, to Army of the Tennessee; First Lieut. O.
y from his position in Buzzard Roost Gap back to the ground he now held at Kenesaw Mountain. During this time the labors of the engineers were confined to reconnoitering, road making, and bridge building. Pontoon bridges had been built over the Oostenaula, at Resaca, at Lay's Ferry, and two flat-boat bridges over the Coosawattee; also pontoon bridges over the Etowah River at the cliffs. The enemy showed little disposition to yield his stronghold at Kenesaw. After the assault of the 27th June it was determined to move toward our right, at the same time advancing that flank, a movement which it was supposed would result in the evacuation by the enemy of all ground north of the Ohattahoochee except his bridge-head at the railroad crossing. Receiving instructions from General Sherman, commanding, I made a personal reconnaissance of the ground upon our right as far as our extreme cavalry outposts, at or near Anderson's Mill or Olley's Creek, and immediately upon my return and repo
ing received authority to organize the regiment of Veteran Volunteer Engineers provided for by act of Congress, had gone to Chattanooga for that purpose. Early in July the following officers of the Corps of Engineers, who had just graduated at West Point, reported to me, and were assigned to duty as follows: Capt. J. W. Barlow, toffensive-defensive, as shown by the fact that three desperate and severe battles were fought, within ten days after he assumed command. The last three days of July were devoted to skirmishing to attain positions as favorable as possible. Meanwhile, under instructions from the major-general commanding, I selected a new line t from our front line near Walker's house, on the Collier's Mill (Buck Head) road nearly due north, to the line of rebel works evacuated on the night of the 2lst of July. On the night of the 1st of August the Army of the Ohio was withdrawn from its position on the left, and rapidly moved to the right near the poor-house and ext
No. 6. report of Capt. Orlando M. Poe, Corps of Engineers, U, S. Army, Chief engineer, of operations July 1-October 31, 1864. Washington, D. C., October 8, 1865. Sir: In accordance with the circular from the Engineer Bureau, dated September 2, 1865, I have the honor to report as follows, concerning the engineer operations and the works of attack and defense conducted under my superintendence during the year ending June 30, 1865 : This report will naturally be divided into four parts, viz: First. The Atlanta campaign, from the 1st of July, 1864, to the occupation of the city, September 2, 1864. Second. The new defenses of Atlanta and the Savannah campaign, including the time from the 3d of September, 1864, to the 25th of January, 1865. Third. The campaign from Savannah, Ga., to Goldsborough, N. C., from January 25, 1865, to March 22, 1865. Fourth. The campaign from Goldsborough, N. C., to Raleigh, N. C., and the march from Raleigh to Washington City, f
on by the enemy of all ground north of the Ohattahoochee except his bridge-head at the railroad crossing. Receiving instructions from General Sherman, commanding, I made a personal reconnaissance of the ground upon our right as far as our extreme cavalry outposts, at or near Anderson's Mill or Olley's Creek, and immediately upon my return and report the Army of the Tennessee was put in motion. No sooner was this movement developed than the enemy, on the night of the 2d and morning of the 3d of July, evacuated his position at Kenesaw and in front of Marietta, and we took position, the troops moving right on in pursuit. Contrary to expectation and information, we found that the enemy intended to make a stand upon a line from Ruff's Station (Neal Dow) to Ruff's Mill, the flanks being refused along Nickajack and Rottenwood Creeks. This line had been prepared by militia and contrabands only a few days before its occupation by Johnston's army, and was well built, consisting of good infan
ound that the enemy intended to make a stand upon a line from Ruff's Station (Neal Dow) to Ruff's Mill, the flanks being refused along Nickajack and Rottenwood Creeks. This line had been prepared by militia and contrabands only a few days before its occupation by Johnston's army, and was well built, consisting of good infantry parapets, connecting salients, in which were placed a large number of pieces of field artillery in embrasure. The length of this line was nearly six miles. On the 4th of July our skirmishers drove the enemy's into the works on the main road by a spirited dash, being supported by the divisions of Stanley, of the Fourth Corps, and Johnson, of the Fourteenth Corps, and our lines pressed up at all points, but not near enough to silence the artillery. Late in the evening the Sixteenth Corps, forming the left of the Army of the Tennessee, carried by assault a portion of the rebel line. At daylight on the morning of the 5th of July our skirmishers advanced, only to
line was nearly six miles. On the 4th of July our skirmishers drove the enemy's into the works on the main road by a spirited dash, being supported by the divisions of Stanley, of the Fourth Corps, and Johnson, of the Fourteenth Corps, and our lines pressed up at all points, but not near enough to silence the artillery. Late in the evening the Sixteenth Corps, forming the left of the Army of the Tennessee, carried by assault a portion of the rebel line. At daylight on the morning of the 5th of July our skirmishers advanced, only to find the enemy gone, a movement rendered necessary upon their part by the success of the Sixteenth Corps on the evening previous. The next linie of works was found in front of the railroad bridge and the several roads and pontoon bridges, at Pace's, Montgomery's, and Turner's Ferries, forming a very extensive tete-de-pont, which consisted of a system of square redoubts, in defensive relations, connected by infantry parapets, but few of these redoubts
gone farther south. 3Not an able-bodied man was to be found between Marietta and the enemy's line. We could only feel our way cautiously forward, using the greatest diligence in reconnaissances. The Army of the Tennessee, forming the left wing, was directed toward Stone Mountain; the Army of the Ohio, in the center, toward Cross Keys and Decatur, and the Army of the Cumberland, on the right, via Buck Head, toward Atlanta. The left wing and the center crossed Nancy's Creek the same day, July 18. The cavalry division of General Garrard, which had been operating on the extreme left, succeeded in reaching the Augusta railroad between Decatur and Stone Mountain. On the next day, July 19, the Twenty-third Army Corps, after a sharp skirmish, occupied Decatur, where it formed a junction with the Army of the Tennessee. The Army of the Ohio then withdrew, and passing to the right camped for the night on Pea Vine Creek. The Army of the Cumberland crossed a small force over Peach Tree Cr
of General Garrard, which had been operating on the extreme left, succeeded in reaching the Augusta railroad between Decatur and Stone Mountain. On the next day, July 19, the Twenty-third Army Corps, after a sharp skirmish, occupied Decatur, where it formed a junction with the Army of the Tennessee. The Army of the Ohio then withe position was a most admirable one, and the enemy was severely whipped. The rebel army in our front had been under command of Joseph E. Johnston until the 19th of July, when the command was transferred to General Hood. Johnston's policy appeared to be a purely defensive one. Hood's was decidedly offensive-defensive, as showllustrating the siege, so called, of Atlanta has been forwarded to the Engineer Bureau, in which these surveys are compiled, from the passage of Peach Tree Creek, July 19, to the beginning of the movement upon the enemy's lines of communication, August 25, and a general map, photographic copy, illustrating the entire campaign from
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