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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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East Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
rming me that he would attempt to reach the enemy's line of railroad communication, at or near East Point, the junction of the roads from West Point and Macon to Atlanta. It is about six miles southwthrust our forces through our lines' and effect a lodgment on the railroad between Atlanta and East Point. The attack, however, was not made. August 5, the Chattahoochee river railroad bridge wasck to the Chattahoochee railroad bridge), around Atlanta upon the railroads running south from East Point, and the pontoon train of the Army of the Cumberland was moved from the railroad bridge, alongntoon bridges at that point. August 17, orders for the movement of the army to the rear of East Point were promulgated. The cavalry command of General Kilpatrick started upon a raid to the southwd in position along Camp Creek, covering all the roads leading from Mount Gilead Church toward East Point and Red Oak. The Army of the Tennessee was thrown further to the right, but close enough to ke
Rome, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
rst Michigan Engineers and Mechanics ordered to the front. This regiment, or rather eight companies of it, arrived at Atlanta about the last of September. Two more companies subsequently joined, but the remaining two companies did not reach the regiment for some months. The major-general commanding having directed that the new line of fortifications be proceeded with, the entire engineer force was set at work to construct the profiles and revetments. General Corse, then commanding at Rome, Ga., on the 29th of September, made an urgent requisition for an engineer officer to examine and improve the defenses of that town. Lieut. William Ludlow, Corps of Engineers, was sent. The first infantry details for work on the fortifications were called for on the 3d of October, and numbered 2,000 men. On the 5th of October I telegraphed to General Sherman, then at Big Shanty, as follows: The new line of works is in a defensible condition from the redoubt where the photographs were t
Howells Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
the Tennessee advanced along the Augusta railroad to within about three and a half miles of Atlanta, where the enemy was found intrenched. The Army of the Ohio moved along the road leading from Judge Peyton's to Atlanta, and soon encountered the enemy intrenched. The Army of the Cumberland crossed Peach Tree Creek at several points, and the left of it (Fourth Corps), connecting with the Army of the Ohio, met the same obstacle. The Fourteenth Corps, on the extreme right, moving on the Howell's Mill road, joined the Twentieth Corps on its left, and this, in turn, joined Newton's division,of the Fourth Corps, which was moving on the Collier's Mill road. There was no communication on the south side of Peach Tree Creek between Newton's and the other divisions of the Fourth Corps. This was the status when two rebel corps moving down the Howell's Mill road and Collier's Mill road attacked the Twentieth Corps, together with the left division of the Fourteenth Corps and Newton's division
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
of less than a dozen men, but between us and Atlanta, our objective, were still the three serious mberland, on the right, via Buck Head, toward Atlanta. The left wing and the center crossed Nancy'along the road leading from Judge Peyton's to Atlanta, and soon encountered the enemy intrenched. stacles already referred to as between us and Atlanta. July 21, we steadily pressed forward alolanta. It is about six miles southwest from Atlanta. This movement he hoped would either result done, that he intended to gain possession of Atlanta by operating upon the enemy's lines of communtrick started upon a raid to the southward of Atlanta. August 18 and 19, the troops kept hard aahoochee bridge for the purpose, marched into Atlanta. In describing these operations I have goating the entire campaign from Chattanooga to Atlanta. I have also forwarded to the Bureau, a compjected upon the map illustrating the siege of Atlanta. For continuation of this report, see Vols. [17 more...]
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
en before Kenesaw Mountain, a position to which I had been assigned by Special Field Orders, No. 1, headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, dated Chattanooga, Tenn., May 3, 1864. At that time the engineer organization for the army in the field was altogether inadequate. There were within the limits of the military divrrill, Corps of Engineers, but he having received authority to organize the regiment of Veteran Volunteer Engineers provided for by act of Congress, had gone to Chattanooga for that purpose. Early in July the following officers of the Corps of Engineers, who had just graduated at West Point, reported to me, and were assigned to duto the beginning of the movement upon the enemy's lines of communication, August 25, and a general map, photographic copy, illustrating the entire campaign from Chattanooga to Atlanta. I have also forwarded to the Bureau, a complete set of photographic views illustrating military operations about Atlanta. Maps and views here ment
Flynt (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
as rapidly as possible. This was continued on the 28th of July, when, at about noon, a furious attack was made upon the Army of the Tennessee, particularly upon the Fifteenth Corps, by a force of the enemy which moved from Atlanta out on the Lick Skillet road. The whole of the Fifteenth Corps had been refused along a ridge extending northwestwardly from Ezra Church, and nearly parallel with the Lick Skillet road, its left joining the Seventeenth Corps and making nearly a right angle with it nLick Skillet road, its left joining the Seventeenth Corps and making nearly a right angle with it near the church. The position was a most admirable one, and the enemy was severely whipped. The rebel army in our front had been under command of Joseph E. Johnston until the 19th of July, when the command was transferred to General Hood. Johnston's policy appeared to be a purely defensive one. Hood's was decidedly offensive-defensive, as shown by the fact that three desperate and severe battles were fought, within ten days after he assumed command. The last three days of July were dev
Roswell, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s almost impossible. Having decided to pass the river by our left, strong demonstrations were made upon our right to confirm the enemy in the impression that the movement was to be made in that direction, and that we would attempt to cross the river at some point below the mouth of Nickajack Creek. The points selected for the crossing were at Roswell Factory and Phillips' (Isham's) Ferry, and the Army of the Tennessee, which had been demonstrating upon our right, was suddenly thrown to Roswell, where it crossed the Chattahoochee upon a trestle bridge, built by the pioneers of the Sixteenth Army Corps out of the materials at hand. No opposition was made by the enemy. The Army of the Ohio, which had been on the left, now become the center, made a rapid movement across the river at Phillips' Ferry, surprising a small force of the enemy stationed there, and capturing one piece of artillery. While the force which actually effected the crossing was engaged in constructing some light
Nickajack Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ation and information, we found that the enemy intended to make a stand upon a line from Ruff's Station (Neal Dow) to Ruff's Mill, the flanks being refused along Nickajack and Rottenwood Creeks. This line had been prepared by militia and contrabands only a few days before its occupation by Johnston's army, and was well built, conse was nothing in the plan to recomnmend them to the attention of the engineers. The left of this line rested upon a large seven-gun redoubt near the mouth of Nickajack Creek, and the right upon another redoubt prepared for eight guns, and situated near the Chattahoochee, about one mile above the railroad bridge. Opposite this poi the enemy in the impression that the movement was to be made in that direction, and that we would attempt to cross the river at some point below the mouth of Nickajack Creek. The points selected for the crossing were at Roswell Factory and Phillips' (Isham's) Ferry, and the Army of the Tennessee, which had been demonstrating upon
Decatur (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
reconnaissances. The Army of the Tennessee, forming the left wing, was directed toward Stone Mountain; the Army of the Ohio, in the center, toward Cross Keys and Decatur, and the Army of the Cumberland, on the right, via Buck Head, toward Atlanta. The left wing and the center crossed Nancy's Creek the same day, July 18. The cavalry division of General Garrard, which had been operating on the extreme left, succeeded in reaching the Augusta railroad between Decatur and Stone Mountain. On the next day, July 19, the Twenty-third Army Corps, after a sharp skirmish, occupied Decatur, where it formed a junction with the Army of the Tennessee. The Army of the ODecatur, where it formed a junction with the Army of the Tennessee. The Army of the Ohio then withdrew, and passing to the right camped for the night on Pea Vine Creek. The Army of the Cumberland crossed a small force over Peach Tree Creek, which maintained its footing. July 20, the Army of the Tennessee advanced along the Augusta railroad to within about three and a half miles of Atlanta, where the enemy was
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
r pushed on still farther and succeeded in seizing the Flint River bridge and gaining a foothold between the river and Jonesborough. The enemy was found in force, covering the town. August 31, the Army of the Ohio moved toward a point on the Mache Army of the Cumberland moved from Couch's due east, until they struck the railroad between the Army of the Ohio and Jonesborough, when they also intrenched. About the same time that these forces reached the railroad the enemy attacked the lines of the Army of the Tennessee immediately in front of Jonesborough and tried to carry them by assault. They were repulsed with heavy loss. It was reported to me by Captain Reese that the First Missouri Engineers, which had been transferred at my ras concentrated so as to connect from the left of the Army of the Tennessee to the railroad, about two miles north of Jonesborough, the Fourth Army Corps destroying the railroad as it advanced. The Army of the Ohio commenced the destruction of the
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