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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Dallas, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Army of the Cumberland, In the Field, near Dallas, Ga., June 5, 1864. Colonel: I have the honorarmy at daylight on the morning of the 23d on Dallas, by Euharlee and Stilesborough; the division om General McPherson's army, to march direct on Dallas, by way of Van Wert. The advance guard of Mc-g that Johnston was moving in the direction of Dallas and Powder Springs. General Garrard, commandin on Pumpkin Vine Creek, about three miles from Dallas, and that in moving on that place, and when wid repulsed this force and drove it back toward Dallas. On the 25th the First Division of Cavalryoker's command advanced on the road leading to Dallas running south of the one used by Butterfield'snessee), was sent by General Palmer to move on Dallas by the most direct road from where he then wasnd covering the road leading from Allatoona to Dallas, via New Hope Church. There was light skirmishort and warm contest. General Davis occupied Dallas with his division on the afternoon of the 27th[1 more...]
East Chickamauga Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
eld, near Dallas, Ga., June 5, 1864. Colonel: I have the honor to report the operations of my command for the month of May as follows: In obedience to instructions from the major-general commanding the military division, I got my command in readiness for a forward movement on Dalt on, Ga., and was fully prepared to move on the 2d of May, as directed. Major-General Hooker, commanding Twentieth Army Corps, was directed to move from Lookout Valley, via Lee and Gordon's Mills, on East Chickamauga Creek, to Leet's farm, on the road leading from the mills to Nickajack Gap, the movement to commence on the 2d. Major-General Palmer, commanding the Fourteenth Army Corps, was to concentrate his command at Ringgold, Ga., and Major-General Howard, commanding the Fourth Army Corps, was to move from Cleveland, East Tennessee, on the 3d, and concentrate his command in the vicinity of Catoosa Springs, about three miles east of Ringgold; McCook's division of cavalry to move on Howard's left; Ki
Tunnel Hill (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
sion of cavalry to move on Howard's left; Kilpatrick's division of cavalry was stationed at Ringgold, picketing toward Tunnel Hill, and patrolling on Palmer's right flank; Garrard's division was detached and operating under instructions from Major-Ghed from the right to the left of the whole command. According to instructions given on the 6th, the army moved on Tunnel Hill at daylight on the 7th in three columns-Palmer's corps on the direct road from Ringgold, Howard's via Lee's house, and Hooker's via Nickajack Gap and Trickum. The enemy made some show of resistance in Palmer's front, but evacuated Tunnel Hill on the appearance of Howard's column on his flank, and fled toward Buzzard Roost, our troops occupying Tunnel Hill Ridge. Tunnel Hill Ridge. Palmer's command was then moved forward and took position on Howard's right along the ridge, and both corps remained there for the night. Hooker's column reached Trickum Post-Office about 4 p. m. and camped for the night, picketing strongly the ro
Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
f General Hooker. Baird's division, of the Fourteenth Corps, was left at Burnt Hickory to protect the trains at that point and the rear of the army. McCook's division of cavalry met the enemy's cavalry on the road leading from Burnt Hickory to Marietta near its intersection with the lower Dallas and Allatoona road. McCook's troops skirmished heavily with the force opposing them, inflicting on them considerable loss and capturing 52 prisoners, from whom it was ascertained that the whole of Wheeft of Schofield's command, with Johnson's division, of Palmer's corps, on the left of Wood; Stoneman's division of cavalry holding a hill to the left of Johnson, and then McCook's division of cavalry holding the road leading from Burnt Church to Marietta, via Golgotha, and guarding the left of the army. During the 28th there was considerable artillery firing, with skirmishing at intervals during the day and night. During the night of the 29th the enemy felt our line at several points, witho
Chattoogata Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
obstructions of too formidable character to admit of farther progress, except with very severe loss; it was instructed to hold the position. Wood's division, of the Fourth Corps; Davis' division, of the Fourteenth Corps, and Butterfield's division, of the Twentieth Corps, then pushed forward a line of skirmishers and drove the enemy to his intrenchments, our men occupying the mouth of Buzzard Roost. Geary's division, of the Twentieth Corps, made a reconnaissance well up the side of Chattoogata Mountain (a high and precipitous ridge running due south from Buzzard Roost). Geary's men fought their way well up to the enemy's intrenchments on the crest, but with considerable loss and without being able to gain possession of Mill Gap. The troops were then withdrawn to a, position in the valley out of reach of the enemy's guns; Kilpatrick's communicated with General McPherson's command at Villanow, and then returned to Trickum. Brig. Gen. Ed. McCook was ordered to concentrate his cavalry
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ajor-General Palmer, commanding the Fourteenth Army Corps, was to concentrate his command at Ringgold, Ga., and Major-General Howard, commanding the Fourth Army Corps, was to move from Cleveland, Eas 3d, and concentrate his command in the vicinity of Catoosa Springs, about three miles east of Ringgold; McCook's division of cavalry to move on Howard's left; Kilpatrick's division of cavalry was stationed at Ringgold, picketing toward Tunnel Hill, and patrolling on Palmer's right flank; Garrard's division was detached and operating under instructions from Major-General McPherson, commanding thed on Tunnel Hill at daylight on the 7th in three columns-Palmer's corps on the direct road from Ringgold, Howard's via Lee's house, and Hooker's via Nickajack Gap and Trickum. The enemy made some shomands with ten days rations and a good supply of ammunition, sending all surplus wagons back to Ringgold. At 9 a. m. on the 13th General Howard's command occupied Dalton, it having been evacuated
Cleveland, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ly prepared to move on the 2d of May, as directed. Major-General Hooker, commanding Twentieth Army Corps, was directed to move from Lookout Valley, via Lee and Gordon's Mills, on East Chickamauga Creek, to Leet's farm, on the road leading from the mills to Nickajack Gap, the movement to commence on the 2d. Major-General Palmer, commanding the Fourteenth Army Corps, was to concentrate his command at Ringgold, Ga., and Major-General Howard, commanding the Fourth Army Corps, was to move from Cleveland, East Tennessee, on the 3d, and concentrate his command in the vicinity of Catoosa Springs, about three miles east of Ringgold; McCook's division of cavalry to move on Howard's left; Kilpatrick's division of cavalry was stationed at Ringgold, picketing toward Tunnel Hill, and patrolling on Palmer's right flank; Garrard's division was detached and operating under instructions from Major-General McPherson, commanding the Army of the Tennessee. The army got into position by the 5th, and sto
Villanow (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
fice about 4 p. m. and camped for the night, picketing strongly the roads leading from Buzzard Roost and Dalton, as well as the approaches from the direction of Villanow. General Kilpatrick's division of cavalry took post at or near Gordon's Spring to be in readiness to establish communication with the Army of the Tennessee, which was expected at Villanow on the 8th. On the morning of the 8th Harker's brigade, of Newton's division, Howard's corps, was pushed along the crest of Rocky Face Ridge to within half a mile of the rebels' signal station, where it came upon obstructions of too formidable character to admit of farther progress, except with veryGap. The troops were then withdrawn to a, position in the valley out of reach of the enemy's guns; Kilpatrick's communicated with General McPherson's command at Villanow, and then returned to Trickum. Brig. Gen. Ed. McCook was ordered to concentrate his cavalry division and take post on the left of General Schofield until Genera
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
alton. General Howard pursued the enemy along the railroad in the direction of Resaca, capturing a considerable number of prisoners. The concentration of the bal on the 13th Hooker's corps, preceded by Kilpatrick's cavalry, moved out on the Resaca road in support of McPherson's troops, threatening Resaca. Palmer's corps moveResaca. Palmer's corps moved out of Snake Creek Gap two miles northeast of Hooker, and then took a course parallel with the Resaca road, with orders to proceed as far as the railroad. On reachResaca road, with orders to proceed as far as the railroad. On reaching the neighborhood of the railroad his skirmishers encountered those of the enemy strongly posted on the hills immediately west of the railroad, and continued a fiehills strongly occupied by the enemy on the eastern road leading from Tilton to Resaca. The rebels were driven for nearly a mile and a half, our forces capturing 4 g Information was received by daylight on the 16th that Johnston had evacuated Resaca, and directions were immediately given for the whole army to start in pursuit.
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
he afternoon of the 23d, and found the place occupied by a strong force of the enemy's cavalry, supported by infantry, which resisted his farther advance, skirmishing with him until dark. The commands of Major-Generals Hooker, Howard, and Palmer camped on the south side of Euharlee Creek, in accordance with my directions. General Hooker was directed to send one division of his command at daylight on the morning of the 24th to push the enemy across Raccoon Creek toward Allatoona, on the Alabama road, and hold him in that position until relieved by the Army of the Ohio, covering the movements of the balance of the Twentieth Corps, directly through Stilesborough, upon Burnt Hickory, at which latter place his whole command was to encamp. McCook's division of cavalry was to precede the Twentieth Corps in the movement upon Burnt Hickory, and then take up a position toward Allatoona, picketing the roads strongly, and covering the movements of the army. The Fourth Corps followed the Tw
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