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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Buzzard Roost (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
commanding Third brigade, of operations May 7-July 5. New Albany, August 7, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the Third Brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, during the advance of the army from Ringgold on Atlanta: We marched from Ringgold on the morning of May 7 and deployed line at Tunnel Hill. A few artillery missiles passed over us and some slight skirmishing only opposed our progress until we arrived in front of Buzzard Roost on the morning of the 9th. Here the enemy were well fortified in a strong position, and notwithstanding our demonstrations refrained from showing themselves in force or developing the position of their batteries until the afternoon of the 9th, when I received orders from General Johnson to move forward with my command to the support of General Carlin, who had succeeded in gaining the side of the mountain without further opposition than the enemy's skirmishing. I had scarcely crossed th
Kenesaw Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
ed, until General Baird moved up on my right. Breast-works were thrown up, and a battery placed in position near my right, which opened on Pine Mountain, farther to the right and near other positions of the army. Joining in the movement on the right and left of the mountain, the enemy were compelled to either fall back or be captured. They chose the former. Our forces had now gained Lost and Pine Mountains, and the right, from day to day, continued to swing round to the left, toward Kenesaw Mountain and Marietta. In this movement my command participated. On the 17th I was ordered by General King to take a position on the edge of the woods facing south and perpendicular to the front. The ground was previously examined by Generals Baird, King, and myself, and the object of the movement fully explained. A battery was placed on my left, and the whole line intrenched after night-fall, without developing the movement to the enemy, who occupied the wood across the open field in my fro
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
in information and cover the movements of other portions of the army. From the 12th to the 16th we were occupied in making a flank movement through Snake Creek Gap, and operating against the enemy, who had fallen back and were concentrating near Resaca. We supported General Carlin in the charge on the enemy's works on the 14th. At midnight of the 15th the enemy made an assault, which extended to my front, and was promptly repulsed. On the morning of the 16th the enemy had abandoned their wor from right to left, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania, Thirty-seventh Indiana, Thirty-eighth Indiana, First Wisconsin, and Twenty-first Ohio in the front line on the left of Wood, the Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania having been detailed for special duty at Resaca, I had only the Seventy-fourth Ohio in the second line. The enemy, failing in their attempt to turn my left, renewed their attack upon my right. The Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania and Thirty-seventh Indiana were most exposed, and, with a persis
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
No. 111. reports of Col. Benjamin F. Scribner, Thirty-eighth Indiana Infantry, commanding Third brigade, of operations May 7-July 5. New Albany, August 7, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the Third Brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, during the advance of the army from Ringgold on Atlanta: We marched from Ringgold on the morning of May 7 and deployed line at Tunnel Hill. A few artillery missiles passed over us and some slight skirmishing only opposed our progress until we arrived in front of Buzzard Roost on the morning of the 9th. Here the enemy were well fortified in a strong position, and notwithstanding our demonstrations refrained from showing themselves in force or developing the position of their batteries until the afternoon of the 9th, when I received orders from General Johnson to move forward with my command to the support of General Carlin, who had succeeded in gaining the side of the mountain wi
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
a shell. My force of 116 officers and 2,980 men comprised the Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania, Colonel Hambright; Twenty-first Ohio, Colonel Neibling; Seventy-fourth Ohio, Colonel Given; Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania, Colonel Sirwell; Thirty-seventh Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Ward; First Wisconsin, Lieutenant-Colonel Bingham, and Thiy General King to send two regiments to report to General Carlin, and two to Colonel Stoughton, now commanding King's brigade. The First Wisconsin and Twentyfirst Ohio were sent to Carlin, the Thirty-eighth Indiana and Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania reported to Colonel Stoughton. The Seventy-fourth Ohio and Thirty-seventh Indiana wosed by the enemy, and the positions gained by him from time to time were the results of many sharp conflicts. In these fights the First Wisconsin and Twentyfirst Ohio were most exposed. The First Wisconsin, especially, suffered severely, and for three days performed their arduous duties with great courage and fortitude. On the
Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
have the honor to report the operations of my command from June 14 to July 6, inclusive. On the morning of the 14th we advanced in line of battle toward the Marietta road, the objective point being Pine Mountain, upon which the enemy had fortifications and artillery. After a difficult and circuitous march through the woods tthe former. Our forces had now gained Lost and Pine Mountains, and the right, from day to day, continued to swing round to the left, toward Kenesaw Mountain and Marietta. In this movement my command participated. On the 17th I was ordered by General King to take a position on the edge of the woods facing south and perpendicular. All night was spent in fortifying. Early next morning we were in pursuit of the enemy, who had abandoned Kenesaw and were in full retreat. We passed through Marietta, and came up with them about three miles south of this place, where they had prepared breast-works. On the 5th the enemy abandoned this position, and fell back
Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
lieved by General Kimball, and with the division moved to the left to form a new line perpendicular to the rear of the extreme left. All night was spent in fortifying. Early next morning we were in pursuit of the enemy, who had abandoned Kenesaw and were in full retreat. We passed through Marietta, and came up with them about three miles south of this place, where they had prepared breast-works. On the 5th the enemy abandoned this position, and fell back to their works, across the Chattahoochee River, leaving a strong rear guard to oppose our progress, and cover their retreat. We followed in close pursuit. In consequence of severe illness, I was forced to ride in an ambulance at the head of my column until the enemy made a stand at the river. Here I mounted my horse, but had scarcely put my men in position when I became so ill that I was carried to my ambulance in the rear of my line. The next morning I turned over the command to Colonel Given, and was taken to the hospital.
Pine Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
Albany, August 7, 1864. Lieutenant: I have the honor to report the operations of my command from June 14 to July 6, inclusive. On the morning of the 14th we advanced in line of battle toward the Marietta road, the objective point being Pine Mountain, upon which the enemy had fortifications and artillery. After a difficult and circuitous march through the woods to prevent the development of the movement, we at once debouched from the woods and moved by the right flank, and formed in fron in the edge of the woods. A sharp skirmish attended the formation, and for a time my line was enfiladed, until General Baird moved up on my right. Breast-works were thrown up, and a battery placed in position near my right, which opened on Pine Mountain, farther to the right and near other positions of the army. Joining in the movement on the right and left of the mountain, the enemy were compelled to either fall back or be captured. They chose the former. Our forces had now gained Lost a
Tunnel Hill (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
No. 111. reports of Col. Benjamin F. Scribner, Thirty-eighth Indiana Infantry, commanding Third brigade, of operations May 7-July 5. New Albany, August 7, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the Third Brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, during the advance of the army from Ringgold on Atlanta: We marched from Ringgold on the morning of May 7 and deployed line at Tunnel Hill. A few artillery missiles passed over us and some slight skirmishing only opposed our progress until we arrived in front of Buzzard Roost on the morning of the 9th. Here the enemy were well fortified in a strong position, and notwithstanding our demonstrations refrained from showing themselves in force or developing the position of their batteries until the afternoon of the 9th, when I received orders from General Johnson to move forward with my command to the support of General Carlin, who had succeeded in gaining the side of the mountain wi
Etowah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 115
ating against the enemy, who had fallen back and were concentrating near Resaca. We supported General Carlin in the charge on the enemy's works on the 14th. At midnight of the 15th the enemy made an assault, which extended to my front, and was promptly repulsed. On the morning of the 16th the enemy had abandoned their works. The time intervening between the 16th and 27th was occupied in the arduous work of pursuing the enemy, forming lines, and building fortifications. We crossed the Etowah River on the 23d and Pumpkin Vine Creek on the 26th. On the morning of the 27th I was ordered to form on the left of General King and advance with him in support of General Wood, whose division was formed in our front. The object of the movement was to discover the enemy's right and turn it. Everything being ready, the advance commenced. We proceeded east until the enemy's works were discovered, which advised us that we were not far enough to their right. Then we marched north, then east, t
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