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Howells Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 116
a few hundred yards and formed line of battle to the left of the road. Threw out skirmishers in front and on the left flank. Moved forward, skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry until the skirmishers reached Nancy's Creek. July 18, moved forward, driving the enemy's mounted infantry, from time to time during the day, from temporary defenses, and finally across Peach Tree Creek, on the banks of which the line rested for the night. On the night of the 19th crossed Peach Tree Creek at Howell's Mill. July 20, at daylight moved to the left of the road and formed line of battle, leaving sufficient space for the First Brigade to form between my right and the road, its right resting upon the road and connecting with the left of the Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. Skirmishers being thrown forward, I advanced through woods, skirmishing, some 300 yards, when I was directed to halt and fortify my position. While doing this a portion of the Twentieth Army Corps came up on my lef
Nancys Creek (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 116
aptain: I have the honor of respectfully submitting the following report of the operations of the Third Brigade since I took command of it, July 15, 1864, except those of the 1st instant, already given: July 17, crossed the Chattahoochee River at Pace's Ferry. Moved up the road a few hundred yards and formed line of battle to the left of the road. Threw out skirmishers in front and on the left flank. Moved forward, skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry until the skirmishers reached Nancy's Creek. July 18, moved forward, driving the enemy's mounted infantry, from time to time during the day, from temporary defenses, and finally across Peach Tree Creek, on the banks of which the line rested for the night. On the night of the 19th crossed Peach Tree Creek at Howell's Mill. July 20, at daylight moved to the left of the road and formed line of battle, leaving sufficient space for the First Brigade to form between my right and the road, its right resting upon the road and con
Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 116
pectfully, your obedient servant, M. F. Moore, Colonel Sixty-ninth Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Commanding. Capt. G. W. Smith, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Div., 14th Army Corps. Hdqrs. Third Brig., First Div., 14TH Army Corps, Atlanta, September 8, 1864. Captain: I have the honor of respectfully submitting the following report of the operations of the Third Brigade since I took command of it, July 15, 1864, except those of the 1st instant, already given: July 17, crossed the Chattahoochee River at Pace's Ferry. Moved up the road a few hundred yards and formed line of battle to the left of the road. Threw out skirmishers in front and on the left flank. Moved forward, skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry until the skirmishers reached Nancy's Creek. July 18, moved forward, driving the enemy's mounted infantry, from time to time during the day, from temporary defenses, and finally across Peach Tree Creek, on the banks of which the line rested for the night. On the night
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 116
form courtesy and respect shown to me as brigade commander. I am under special obligations to Colonel Given, Seventy-fourth Ohio; Lieutenant-Colonel Bingham, First Wisconsin, and Lieutenant-Colonel Griffin, Thirty-eighth Indiana, who have commanded demi-brigades, for valuable assistance. To the members of my staff I am also indebted for the energy and fidelity with which they have performed their respective duties. --Very respectfully, your obedient servant, M. F. Moore, Colonel Sixty-ninth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty., Comdg. Brig. Capt. G. W. Smith, Actg. Asst. Adj. Gen., First Div., 14th Army Corps. Inclosure. Casualties in the Third brigade during the campaign in Northern Georgia up to September 8, 1864. Zzz The above list does not contain the casualties of the Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania, as no report could be obtained from that regiment. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, M. F. Moore, Colonel Sixty-ninth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty., Comdg. Brig.
Peach Tree Creek (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 116
Moved forward, skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry until the skirmishers reached Nancy's Creek. July 18, moved forward, driving the enemy's mounted infantry, from time to time during the day, from temporary defenses, and finally across Peach Tree Creek, on the banks of which the line rested for the night. On the night of the 19th crossed Peach Tree Creek at Howell's Mill. July 20, at daylight moved to the left of the road and formed line of battle, leaving sufficient space for the FirPeach Tree Creek at Howell's Mill. July 20, at daylight moved to the left of the road and formed line of battle, leaving sufficient space for the First Brigade to form between my right and the road, its right resting upon the road and connecting with the left of the Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. Skirmishers being thrown forward, I advanced through woods, skirmishing, some 300 yards, when I was directed to halt and fortify my position. While doing this a portion of the Twentieth Army Corps came up on my left, but did not go into position. After we had got our breast-works well toward completion a portion of the Twentieth Army Corp
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 116
commanding Third brigade, of operations July 15-September 8. Hdqrs. Third Brig., First Div., 14TH Army Corps, Jonesborough, Ga., September 3, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade in the battle near Jonesborough, Ga., on Thursday, September 1, 1864: On the morning of that day the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, moved down the Atlanta and Jonesborough road, my brigade having the advance. After passing the right of theJonesborough road, my brigade having the advance. After passing the right of the Army of the Cumberland, directed by the general commanding the division, the Sixty-ninth Ohio, Captain Hicks, was deployed on our front and left flank as shirmishers. Upon connecting with the left of the Army of the Tennessee, I was directed to makroad. August 29, engaged in destroying the railroad. August 30, moved toward the Macon railroad, in the direction of Jonesborough. August 31, moved beyond Renfroe's house, and in the afternoon to the support of the Army of the Tennessee, with the
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 116
ade in the battle near Jonesborough, Ga., on Thursday, September 1, 1864: On the morning of that day the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, moved down the Atlanta and Jonesborough road, my brigade having the advance. After passing the right of the Army of the Cumberland, directed by the general commanding the division, theth Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Commanding. Capt. G. W. Smith, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Div., 14th Army Corps. Hdqrs. Third Brig., First Div., 14TH Army Corps, Atlanta, September 8, 1864. Captain: I have the honor of respectfully submitting the following report of the operations of the Third Brigade since I took command of it his works. On the morning of the 22d we followed the enemy until we came up with them, and then took position on the right of the railroad, about two miles from Atlanta. My command remained here until the afternoon of July 28, when I was directed to move to the extreme right and support the Fifteenth Corps, then engaged. I took
Daniel F. Griffin (search for this): chapter 116
ardships of this protracted campaign with cheerfulness and fortitude. They have met the dangers to which they have been almost constantly exposed with a courage and determination worthy of the cause in which they are engaged. To the officers I am indebted for prompt obedience to orders, and the uniform courtesy and respect shown to me as brigade commander. I am under special obligations to Colonel Given, Seventy-fourth Ohio; Lieutenant-Colonel Bingham, First Wisconsin, and Lieutenant-Colonel Griffin, Thirty-eighth Indiana, who have commanded demi-brigades, for valuable assistance. To the members of my staff I am also indebted for the energy and fidelity with which they have performed their respective duties. --Very respectfully, your obedient servant, M. F. Moore, Colonel Sixty-ninth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty., Comdg. Brig. Capt. G. W. Smith, Actg. Asst. Adj. Gen., First Div., 14th Army Corps. Inclosure. Casualties in the Third brigade during the campaign in
R. W. Johnson (search for this): chapter 116
only by skirmishers. The space intervening between the position occupied by this brigade and the skirmish line was an open field extending to the front nearly a half mile beyond the general line. I was directed by Brig. Gen. R. W. Johnson, then commanding the division, after having relieved this brigade of the Third Division, to advance through the field when the troops on my right and left advanced. A forward movement was then contemplated. After looking at the ground, I requested General Johnson to permit me to put my brigade forward at once behind a ridge occupied by the skirmishers, and in line with the other troops. To this he consented. I accordingly moved my command through the timber to the right and rear of the First Brigade, crossed the road in a slight depression, and got into position a little in advance of the general line without drawing the enemy's fire. I immediately commenced strengthening the light works occupied by the skirmish line on the crest of the ridge
William D. Williams (search for this): chapter 116
n the right of this corps, and made strong works during the night. The following morning I was relieved and returned to my former position. August 3, the Fourteenth Corps, with the exception of my brigade, moved to the right. On the afternoon of the 4th, by direction of Major-General Thomas, my brigade joined the division, and was placed on the extreme right of the army. I had scarcely got into position when I was ordered to go back, with all possible dispatch, and report to Brigadier-General Williams, commanding Twentieth Corps. This I did, and was placed in position between the Twentieth and Sixteenth Corps. Remained here, advancing my lines twice, until the night of August 25, when I joined the division. On the 26th moved farther to the right and went into position on the left of the Twenty-third Corps. August 28, moved across to the Montgomery railroad. August 29, engaged in destroying the railroad. August 30, moved toward the Macon railroad, in the direction of Jon
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