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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Etowah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 153
ignated, that corps was already four miles out from the town. My line when formed connected with the right of Brigadier-General Wood, my right resting on the railroad. During the afternoon, previous to my arrival, I was informed that the enemy had displayed quite a formidable line of battle, but before my division reached the ground it had been retired from view. May 20, on this morning the rebel force was found to have again fallen back, having succeeded in passing his trains over the Etowah River at or near the railroad bridge, which was afterward destroyed. Throughout this and the two following days our troops remained in position, fitting themselves with supplies, so as to be able to quit the railroad and move upon the enemy's flank. On the 22d, the Ninth Ohio Regiment, of the Second Brigade, whose term of service had expired, went North for the purpose of being mustered out. At the same time the Twenty-fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteers from the First Brigade, and the Tenth
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 153
h of the other two brigades, and sent them forward with orders to reach the Macon railroad, if possible, and if they were able, to hold themselves upon it. The party struck that road at Morrow's, or Chapman's, Station, a point four miles from Jonesborough, seven miles from Rough and Ready, and about two and.a half miles from our position. The road was reached about 6 p. m., and a considerable party of rebel cavalry encountered there, and, as the nature of the country admitted readily of our men advance of any other. Colonel Hunter and his officers and men deserve much credit for their enterprise and determination. September 1, about 8 a. m. I received notice that the Fourteenth Corps would be concentrated at my position on the Jonesborough road, to move by it toward that place, whilst the Fourth Corps would move simultaneously along the railroad, I being also directed to withdraw my men from it so as to be ready for the movement. Brigadier-General Carlin's division coming in fr
Pine Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 153
kirmishers. These were readily driven back, and my line formed upon an eminence in front of Pine Mountain, in full view of the rebel works upon it and within range of their batteries. Our artiller object in view at this point was to obtain control of the Burnt Hickory and Marietta road. Pine Mountain lying on this road commanded it. June 11, early in the day, the rebel skirmishers were driveocated about a mile north of the Marietta and Big Shanty road, fronting the northeast end of Pine Mountain. June 12 and 13, no movement took place upon our portion of the line. June 14, our whole lihe south side of the road the strongly built lines of the enemy, stretching from the base of Pine Mountain to the east, were discovered at a few hundred yards' distance. My right, nearer to the moun the enemy having discovered that our lines were rapidly enveloping his advanced position of Pine Mountain, abandoned it in the night, and on the morning of the 15th we took possession of that portio
Nancys Creek (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 153
rejoined the division. In the same interval also Brigadier-General Turchin was compelled to go North for the benefit of his health, and the command of the brigade devolved upon Col. M. B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio, who has retained it until this time. July 17, pontoon bridges having been completed at Pace's Ferry, and the Fourth Corps from above having cleared the opposite shore, we crossed the river, the First and Second Divisions preceding mine. July 18, the corps advanced, passing Nancy's Creek at Kyle's Ferry, and encamped at night with our advance at Howell's Mill, on Peach Tree Creek, the Twentieth Corps being a little above us on our left. July 19, most of the day was spent in reconnoitering the creek, which was deep, and, the bridges being destroyed, the passage was difficult. In front of Howell's Mill, the point occupied by the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, the crossing was strongly disputed, and the character of the ground admitted of such easy defense that to
Flint (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 153
aving heard trains of the enemy during the night moving south along our front, our skirmishers pushed out and at daybreak discovered them, although at a considerable distance, still moving in that direction. They were on a road to the east of Flint River. As soon as this was reported to me I sent forward a battery, supported by Colonel Walker's brigade, and opened a fire of shell upon the wagons, which compelled them to turn back and quit the road. A reconnoitering party from this brigade was then pushed forward about two miles, crossing Flint River, and until it reached the Rough and Ready and Jonesborough road near Smith's, and immediately after the entire division, with Colonel Mitchell's brigade, of the Second Division, ordered to report to me, were brought up and posted at this point. As soon as our troops had secured themselves in this position, about 4 p. m., I detailed Colonel Carlton's regiment, of the First Brigade, together with large parties from each of the other tw
Howells Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 153
the Fourth Corps from above having cleared the opposite shore, we crossed the river, the First and Second Divisions preceding mine. July 18, the corps advanced, passing Nancy's Creek at Kyle's Ferry, and encamped at night with our advance at Howell's Mill, on Peach Tree Creek, the Twentieth Corps being a little above us on our left. July 19, most of the day was spent in reconnoitering the creek, which was deep, and, the bridges being destroyed, the passage was difficult. In front of Howell'sHowell's Mill, the point occupied by the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, the crossing was strongly disputed, and the character of the ground admitted of such easy defense that to have forced a passage must have been hazardous and attended with much loss. In the afternoon, however, the Second Division succeeded in getting over lower down, and I, being in reserve, sent my First Brigade to cross with it. I had at first been directed by Major-General Thomas to cross my division at that place, but o
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 153
their exposure to the fire of the main works did not cease. The regiments being brought up to take position and intrench themselves upon the new line were subjected throughout the day to a galling musketry fire from the rebel main works, as well as from his batteries, from which our loss was considerable. In the very handsome charge of the skirmish line Capt. Michael Stone, of the Thirty-first Ohio Volunteers, commanded the skirmishers of the First Brigade; Maj. R. C. Sabin, Eightyseventh Indiana, those of the Second Brigade, and Maj. William Irving, Thirty-eighth Ohio, those of the Third Brigade, and deserve special mention for their gallantry. Maj. William Irving was wounded in the leg, which has since been amputated, and a little later in the day the brave Lieut. Col. Myron Baker, commanding the Seventy-fourth Indiana, was shot dead whilst putting his regiment in the line. My casualties amounted in all to 5 officers and 78 enlisted men killed and wounded, whilst we captured abo
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 153
Resaca. May 14, having received orders during the night from the majorgeneral commanding the corps to swing forward my entire line along with that of Brigadier-General Johnson, his right being ted that the rebel line of works ran along the western slope of a ridge, which extended from near Resaca northward, on the west side of the railroad. A narrow valley, intersected along its length by ay from the. First Division of the corps, which advanced about the same time, they pushed on into Resaca and were the first to enter that place, and the first to discover the entire withdrawal of the r Volunteers, in charge of skirmishers from my Third Brigade, being the first officer who entered Resaca. The division was marched into the town and remained there until night to await the construction of bridges on which to cross the Oostenaula in pursuit. At Resaca the Eleventh Regiment Ohio Volunteers was detached from the First Brigade and left in garrison at that place, thus reducing the com
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 153
no operations on hand, our daily reports presented not unfrequently a list of 10, 20, or 30 casualties, and the long continuance of the confinement and privation were extremely trying, yet the men bore all with a degree of cheerfulness, patience, and heroism that can find its reward only in the consciousness of duty well performed and of devotion to the holy cause in which they were engaged. During our long stay in such close proximity to the enemy, deserters from their lines, chiefly from Alabama regiments, came in constantly and in large numbers. They finally became so numerous that the most strenuous means were resorted to by the rebel officers to prevent them. On the 22d of August Brigadier-General Davis, having received the brevet of major-general, and been assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Corps, relieved Brigadier-General Johnson, who was transferred out of the corps. August 26, a general movement of the entire army to the right, by which we were to break off fro
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 153
ust have contributed largely to compelling him to retire. July 22, during the night previous the rebel army fell back finally from our front into the works about Atlanta, and my division, marching forward until it came to the Marietta and Atlanta road, followed it until it struck the railroad two miles from the city. We there camAtlanta road, followed it until it struck the railroad two miles from the city. We there came up with the First Division, Fourteenth Corps, whose advance guard was then skirmishing close up to the line of works surrounding that place. The Twentieth Corps was immediately to the left, and the Army of the Tennessee some miles to the eastward on the Augusta railroad. I immediately received orders from Major-General Thomas to move to the south along the west side of the town until I came to the intersection of the Atlanta and Turner's Ferry road with that leading from White Hall to the latter place, and there to post my command. This point was reached without opposition, and my troops were put in position under the supervision of the department comma
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