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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Peach Tree Creek (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
n the north bank of the Chattahoochee, we followed in close pursuit, and again found the enemy confronting us behind strong works. Here we operated with the brigade in the movements that compelled the enemy to abandon his position, burn the bridges, and give us all the territory north of the river. After a few days of rest we again took up the line of march, crossing the Chattahoochee at Pace's Ferry on the 17th of July, 1864. Acting with the brigade, we wrested one of the fords over Peach Tree Creek from the enemy and secured a lodgment on the south bank with no loss of life. Moving forward on the 22d of July, we went into line in front of Atlanta, in the movement losing but 1 man, wounded by shell. Remaining on that line until the 3d of August, when the brigade commenced the movement to the right, crossing Utoy Creek at Herring's Mill, and to this date have taken part with the brigade in the important moves made on the lines of the Fourteenth Corps. We are in an intrenched camp
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
No. 156. reports of Col. Benjamin D. Fearing, Ninety-second Ohio Infantry. Hdqrs. Ninety-Second Regt. Ohio Vol. Infantry, Camp in the Field, August 16, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Ninety-second Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the campaign of the past three months now ending. Breaking up our camps at Ringgold, Ga., on the 7th of May, stripped of all incumbrances of material and men, we marched with the brigade to and through Tunnel Hill and sat down in front of the enermy's stronghold at Dalton. Moving with the brigade on the 12th day of May to the right, along the base of John's Mountain through Snake Creek Gap, we first met the enemy on the morning of the 14th of May. In line of battle, in the first line, on the left of the brigade, we followed the enemy, steadily pushing him back with our heavy lines of skirmishers, until he was forced to take refuge in his works in front of Resaca. Gaining the ridge in p
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
Flint, meeting with no opposition from the enemy; moved forward and secured a fine position commanding the Atlanta and Jonesborough road. Striking this road at two points, we discovered a column of the enemy east of the road moving south on a by-road between the Jonesborough road and the railroad. Here we secured 12 prisoners. We here awaited the brigade, and with them went into camp at this point. Moving with the brigade, September 1, south on the Jonesborough pike, we went into the second line, the brigade forming line of battle one mile from Jonesborough. With the brigade we took part in the action of the 1st of September at Jonesborough. After the evacuation of this point by the enemy, with the brigade we guarded the approaches to Jonesborough. After the evacuation of this point by the enemy, with the brigade we guarded the approaches to the town from the east, and on the 6th of September, the campaign being at an end, we withdrew, covering the withdrawal of our corps to this point. Appended please find report of casualties Shows 1 man killed and 5 men wounded, from the 6th day of
Ackworth, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
aca with the brigade. We followed the retreating enemy over the Oostenaula River and to the banks of the Etowah, where with the army we rested. Again we moved forward on the 23d of May, fording the Etowah, crossing the Euharlee, and marched to Raccoon Creek, returning with the brigade to escort a supply train from Kingston to the army in the field. Returning we joined our division near Dallas, Ga., and with the brigade acted as train guard for the corps train until the 11th of June at Acworth, Ga., when we were relieved and went into the front line, taking part in the movement that forced the enemy to evacuate his works on Pine Knob. Swinging forward through the blinding rain and dense thickets on the morning of the 18th of June, in reserve to the brigade, we saw the enemy driven from their last line of works north of Kenesaw Mountain. Skirmishers from my command took an active part on the 19th of June in forcing the enemy from the valley to take shelter among the rocks on the si
Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
y, but all the officers united in saying that it was not. On the Kenesaw line we moved with the brigade, occupying with it various important positions on that line. On the morning of the 3d of July we moved over the abandoned works of the enemy through Marietta, Ga., and followed the enemy until we found him some four miles southwest of Marietta in works. We took no part as a regiment in forcing the enemy from this line; but on his falling back to the new line on the north bank of the Chattahoochee, we followed in close pursuit, and again found the enemy confronting us behind strong works. Here we operated with the brigade in the movements that compelled the enemy to abandon his position, burn the bridges, and give us all the territory north of the river. After a few days of rest we again took up the line of march, crossing the Chattahoochee at Pace's Ferry on the 17th of July, 1864. Acting with the brigade, we wrested one of the fords over Peach Tree Creek from the enemy and se
Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
he brigade, we saw the enemy driven from their last line of works north of Kenesaw Mountain. Skirmishers from my command took an active part on the 19th of June in forcing the enemy from the valley to take shelter among the rocks on the side of Kenesaw. During the sharp and protracted skirmish of the 19th and 20th I had 1 officer wounded, 1 man killed and I man wounded. It may not be out of place to mention here the operations of the skirmish line from my command on the 21st of June, as t the night as in the day, they expended 24,000 rounds of cartridges. So extraordinary did this seem to me, that I was careful to learn if some of this was not consumed extravagantly, but all the officers united in saying that it was not. On the Kenesaw line we moved with the brigade, occupying with it various important positions on that line. On the morning of the 3d of July we moved over the abandoned works of the enemy through Marietta, Ga., and followed the enemy until we found him some fo
John's Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Ninety-second Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the campaign of the past three months now ending. Breaking up our camps at Ringgold, Ga., on the 7th of May, stripped of all incumbrances of material and men, we marched with the brigade to and through Tunnel Hill and sat down in front of the enermy's stronghold at Dalton. Moving with the brigade on the 12th day of May to the right, along the base of John's Mountain through Snake Creek Gap, we first met the enemy on the morning of the 14th of May. In line of battle, in the first line, on the left of the brigade, we followed the enemy, steadily pushing him back with our heavy lines of skirmishers, until he was forced to take refuge in his works in front of Resaca. Gaining the ridge in plain view of the rebel works, I had portions of my command engaged during the afternoon advantageously posted as sharpshooters. In the day's operations we had 2 me
Sandtown (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
we come to the retiring of our lines from the enemy's front on the morn of the 27th of August. It was a difficult feat to perform, so close were the lines of the enemy, and doubly so that early., In the evening they discovered that we were making changes in the lines, and all night we were subjected to a heavy fire from the enemy's batteries, but we left the line before daylight and drew off without the loss of a man. Equally fortunate were the skirmishers in our front. We moved down the Sandtown road less than a mile, when we acted with the brigade in covering the trains of the Army of the Cumberland, going into line of battle and making arrangements for a vigorous defense of these important trains so much imperiled. After the trains were in safety we moved forward with the brigade; acted as escort to the trains of the army. On the 28th of August, relieved of this duty, we moved with the brigade during the day's march, crossing the Montgomery railroad near Red Oak, Ga., and going
Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
the officers united in saying that it was not. On the Kenesaw line we moved with the brigade, occupying with it various important positions on that line. On the morning of the 3d of July we moved over the abandoned works of the enemy through Marietta, Ga., and followed the enemy until we found him some four miles southwest of Marietta in works. We took no part as a regiment in forcing the enemy from this line; but on his falling back to the new line on the north bank of the Chattahoochee, weMarietta in works. We took no part as a regiment in forcing the enemy from this line; but on his falling back to the new line on the north bank of the Chattahoochee, we followed in close pursuit, and again found the enemy confronting us behind strong works. Here we operated with the brigade in the movements that compelled the enemy to abandon his position, burn the bridges, and give us all the territory north of the river. After a few days of rest we again took up the line of march, crossing the Chattahoochee at Pace's Ferry on the 17th of July, 1864. Acting with the brigade, we wrested one of the fords over Peach Tree Creek from the enemy and secured a lod
Utoy Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 163
again took up the line of march, crossing the Chattahoochee at Pace's Ferry on the 17th of July, 1864. Acting with the brigade, we wrested one of the fords over Peach Tree Creek from the enemy and secured a lodgment on the south bank with no loss of life. Moving forward on the 22d of July, we went into line in front of Atlanta, in the movement losing but 1 man, wounded by shell. Remaining on that line until the 3d of August, when the brigade commenced the movement to the right, crossing Utoy Creek at Herring's Mill, and to this date have taken part with the brigade in the important moves made on the lines of the Fourteenth Corps. We are in an intrenched camp, healthily located, with the enemy in our immediate front, our line running nearly parallel with, and not very far removed from, the Macon railroad. Though we have taken part in all the movements of the First Brigade, it has been our good fortune in all the campaigns to retain each company organization intact. During the ince
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