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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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aptain McDowell, Company B, Independent Pennsylvania Battery, my second chief of artillery, a most excellent and accomplished young officer, was killed while superintending his batteries just before the assault. From this date until the night of the 2d of July we merely maintained our lines, very little firing, even between pickets, occurring. On the night of the 2d of July the lines of the First Division were extended, relieving all of General Newton's division. Early the morning of the 3d, finding the enemy gone, the division followed their trail, leading through Marietta and taking the road east of the railroad leading to Pace's Ferry. This division was in the lead and had some little skirmishing, and in the evening came again upon the enemy intrenched at Ruff's Station. Grose's brigade alone was deployed, and severe skirmishing was kept up during the evening. About 11 o'clock on the 4th, the general commanding the division having expressed a doubt of there being an enemy
n were extended, relieving all of General Newton's division. Early the morning of the 3d, finding the enemy gone, the division followed their trail, leading through Marietta and taking the road east of the railroad leading to Pace's Ferry. This division was in the lead and had some little skirmishing, and in the evening came again upon the enemy intrenched at Ruff's Station. Grose's brigade alone was deployed, and severe skirmishing was kept up during the evening. About 11 o'clock on the 4th, the general commanding the division having expressed a doubt of there being an enemy in force in front of us, orders were given to feel the position strongly. To this end a strong skirmish line, well supported, was deployed, and advanced at charge step over the open corn-field against the enemy's rifle-pits, which were plainly visible and very strong. Colonel Grose's skirmishers having the least distance to move to strike the enemy, at once came under a most galling fire. The day being ve
enemy evacuated his line. Cruft's brigade was started back to Kingston as escort to the wagon train of the corps on the 30th. On the night of the 3d of June we relieved half of Davis' front on the left of this division. Our time was constantly employed, whilst in this position, in pushing out works, by successive advances, close to the enemy; and a constant fire of musketry and artillery was kept up whenever we could annoy the enemy. The 5th we lay in camp near New Hope Church. On the 6th the division moved on the Acworth road to the vicinity of Morris Hill Chapel. The division remained in position at Morris Hill until the morning of the 10th, when, moving through the lines of the Twentieth Corps, on the Marietta road, we soon struck the pickets of the enemy. Pushing forward, the enemy was found in force, with an intrenched line extending across the summit of Pine Top Mountain. The division was formed facing this line of the enemy and intrenched in full view and under easy
p whenever we could annoy the enemy. The 5th we lay in camp near New Hope Church. On the 6th the division moved on the Acworth road to the vicinity of Morris Hill Chapel. The division remained in position at Morris Hill until the morning of the 10th, when, moving through the lines of the Twentieth Corps, on the Marietta road, we soon struck the pickets of the enemy. Pushing forward, the enemy was found in force, with an intrenched line extending across the summit of Pine Top Mountain. The d rear of the corps on the railroad and took position on the Chattahoochee, above Pace's Ferry. From the 5th until the 10th we remained resting in camp, occasionally shelling the rebels across the river and picketing the river and islands. On the 10th the division moved up to Soap Creek, and bivouacked near the pontoon bridges, thrown across by General Schofield. From the crossing of the Chattahoochee to the siege of Atlanta. On the morning of the 12th the division crossed on the pontoon
at Morris Hill until the morning of the 10th, when, moving through the lines of the Twentieth Corps, on the Marietta road, we soon struck the pickets of the enemy. Pushing forward, the enemy was found in force, with an intrenched line extending across the summit of Pine Top Mountain. The division was formed facing this line of the enemy and intrenched in full view and under easy cannon-range of them. This position we maintained with some modifications until the morning of the 15th. On the 14th the position of the enemy was sharply cannonaded by all our batteries, and, as we learned subsequently, the second shot fired from a rifled section of the Fifth Indiana Battery exploded in a group of rebel generals, killing Lieut. Gen. Leonidas Polk. Early the morning of the 15th it was found the enemy had abandoned his work on Pine Top. The position was at once occupied by our skirmishers, and it was learned that Pine Top was an advanced work, the main rebel line being in the rear and conne
ery firing was kept up during the night upon the rebel position. About 11 o'clock the rebels made a demonstration on our pickets, occasioning a general discharge of cannon and muskets along the whole line. Soon after, early on the morning of the 16th, it was found the enemy had evacuated under cover of the night. The loss of the division about Resaca, killed, wounded, and missing, amounted to 200. From the evacuation of Resaca to the evacuation of the line of the Etowah. Early on the mollowing the Second Division, but the general commanding the corps having decided an attack impracticable at the point the head of the column struck the rebel line, this division formed in line and intrenched opposite to the rebel position. On the 16th the line was advanced under severe fire. A heavy cannonade was kept up upon the rebel position all day. While laying out a position for a battery this day Capt. Peter Simonson, Fifth Indiana Battery, chief of artillery, was instantly killed by a
it was found the enemy had evacuated under cover of the night. The loss of the division about Resaca, killed, wounded, and missing, amounted to 200. From the evacuation of Resaca to the evacuation of the line of the Etowah. Early on the morning of the 16th the pursuit was commenced. Finding the bridges at Resaca destroyed, this division built a temporary foot bridge upon the ruins of the railroad bridge over the Oostenaula and pushed on the same evening, camping near Calhoun. On the 17th marched in rear of Newton's division and formed line on his left at 5 p. m., three miles north of Adairsville, where the enemy had made a stand. This division was not engaged. On the 18th passed through Adairsville, getting considerably entangled with the Army of the Tennessee; camped at Cox's house. Early on the morning of the 19th the division took up the line of march for Kingston, The cavalry pickets of the enemy were soon encountered and driven before us through Kingston. We found t
ushed on the same evening, camping near Calhoun. On the 17th marched in rear of Newton's division and formed line on his left at 5 p. m., three miles north of Adairsville, where the enemy had made a stand. This division was not engaged. On the 18th passed through Adairsville, getting considerably entangled with the Army of the Tennessee; camped at Cox's house. Early on the morning of the 19th the division took up the line of march for Kingston, The cavalry pickets of the enemy were soon encvanced to find that he had abandoned his hold on Lost Mountain with his left. Again we had the experience of feeling for the position of the rebels and found him, as usual, strongly intrenched on one of the small branches of Noyes' Creek. On the 18th the rain poured in torrents. Kirby's brigade was sent to support General Newton's division, which engaged the enemy's lines closely all day. This night the enemy again abandoned his line, and on the 19th we moved forward and found him in his intr
ired across the Etowah. From the crossing of the Etowah to the crossing of the Chattahoochee. From the evening of the 19th to the morning of the 23d we remained in camp at Cassville preparing for our movement upon Dallas and thence Marietta. The order was to take twenty days rations, but this division was only enabled, from limited transportation, to carry seventeen days. The division crossed the Etowah the evening of the 23d and camped near Euharlee. Made a tedious day's march on the 24th, reaching camp two miles from Burnt Hickory at 10 o'clock at night in a rain-storm. On the 25th we marched for Dallas, keeping the roads to the right of the main road. At 3 p. m. were ordered to close up rapidly, as General Hooker had found the enemy in force. We crossed the Pumpkin Vine near sunset, and at night closed up to Hooker's left. On the 26th Colonel Grose's brigade went into line on the left of Geary's division. We also put in a battery to play upon the enemy's lines. Early o
From the evening of the 19th to the morning of the 23d we remained in camp at Cassville preparing for our movement upon Dallas and thence Marietta. The order was to take twenty days rations, but this division was only enabled, from limited transportation, to carry seventeen days. The division crossed the Etowah the evening of the 23d and camped near Euharlee. Made a tedious day's march on the 24th, reaching camp two miles from Burnt Hickory at 10 o'clock at night in a rain-storm. On the 25th we marched for Dallas, keeping the roads to the right of the main road. At 3 p. m. were ordered to close up rapidly, as General Hooker had found the enemy in force. We crossed the Pumpkin Vine near sunset, and at night closed up to Hooker's left. On the 26th Colonel Grose's brigade went into line on the left of Geary's division. We also put in a battery to play upon the enemy's lines. Early on the 27th moved the division to the left to relieve Wood's division, which moved off to the left
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