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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
on of, capturing I officer, 15 enlisted men. The troops on our left failing to advance, left us exposed to a galling flank fire, but the men unflinchingly held their ground until relieved by a portion of the Forty-fifth Ohio. I cannot speak too highly of the conduct of my officers and men on this occasion. Our total loss in the action, which lasted one hour and a half, was 4 enlisted men killed, and 6 wounded. On the following day we followed the retreating enemy to a point near the Chattahoochee River, where we remained in reserve until July 10, when with our division the regiment moved to the left, and on July 12 crossed the river, occupying a position in front of the Twenty-third Corps. We remained here until July 18, when the regiment was ordered to report to the corps supply train for duty. Nothing of importance transpired while with the train. On the 30th of August the regiment was relieved from duty with the train and ordered to report immediately to the brigade. Reporte
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
Tassin, Thirty-fifth Indiana Infantry, of operations July I-September 8. Hdqrs. Thirty-Fifth Indiana Volunteers, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: In compliance with circular of September 10, I have the honor to submit the followings of the Thirty-fifth Regiment Indiana Infantry Volunteers during the recent campaign, from July 1, 1864, to the fall of Atlanta: On July 1 the regiment was stationed in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., occupying a reserve position in rear of thed ordered to report immediately to the brigade. Reported to the brigade on the sae day; found the troops to the rear of Atlanta. The same night the Thirty-fifth supported the skirmish line, and on the morning of the 31st advanced a short distance mp about 3 a. m. 6th instant. The following day moved to Rough and Ready, some ten miles from Jonesborough. Arrived in Atlanta on the 8th, and moving about one and a half miles northwest of town went into camp. I have the honor to be, very res
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
under a heavy fire, which continued until dark. We had 2 men wounded on this occasion. The following morning moved after the retreating foe, passing through Jonesborough, and came up with enemy two miles south of the town. Our division moved to the left through a broken country and came upon the enemy's right about night-fall. the Forty-fifth Ohio in the front line. Remained in this position until the night of September 5, when agreeable to orders we quietly withdrew, moved back to Jonesborough, going into camp about 3 a. m. 6th instant. The following day moved to Rough and Ready, some ten miles from Jonesborough. Arrived in Atlanta on the 8th, and y, some ten miles from Jonesborough. Arrived in Atlanta on the 8th, and moving about one and a half miles northwest of town went into camp. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. G. Tassin, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding. Capt. H. F. Temple, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade.
Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
rom July 1, 1864, to the fall of Atlanta: On July 1 the regiment was stationed in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., occupying a reserve position in rear of the second line of our works. On the evening of the 2d the regiment changed position to the left with the brigade, taking the place of the Second Division, Fourth Corps, which moved out. The following morning, the enemy having evacuated their position on Kenesaw Mountain, the regiment took the line of march in pursuit, passing through Marietta, coming up again with the enemy about four miles south of that place. Here the brigade was ordered to halt for the night, the Thirty-fifth being detailed to picket the brigade front. Early next morning orders were received to advance our lines with a view to drive back the enemy's skirmishers, capture their rifle-pits, if possible, and thereby check an enfilading fire which seriously annoyed the troops on our right. The length of our lines at this time was about 500 yards, and extended t
Kenesaw Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
he honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Thirty-fifth Regiment Indiana Infantry Volunteers during the recent campaign, from July 1, 1864, to the fall of Atlanta: On July 1 the regiment was stationed in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., occupying a reserve position in rear of the second line of our works. On the evening of the 2d the regiment changed position to the left with the brigade, taking the place of the Second Division, Fourth Corps, which moved out. The following morning, the enemy having evacuated their position on Kenesaw Mountain, the regiment took the line of march in pursuit, passing through Marietta, coming up again with the enemy about four miles south of that place. Here the brigade was ordered to halt for the night, the Thirty-fifth being detailed to picket the brigade front. Early next morning orders were received to advance our lines with a view to drive back the enemy's skirmishers, capture their rifle-pits, if possible, and thereby ch
Z. L. King (search for this): chapter 26
ng on in our front. After moving forward with the brigade to an open field, we formed in line of battle in the second line. One hour later, with the Twenty-first Kentucky, the Thirty-fifth advanced. About the same time the enemy retreated from our front. Camped that night within one and a half miles of the Macon railroad. On the following morning, September 1, advanced along the railroad, destroying it as we went; came upon the enemy late in the evening going into position on the left of King's brigade. The regiment was under a heavy fire, which continued until dark. We had 2 men wounded on this occasion. The following morning moved after the retreating foe, passing through Jonesborough, and came up with enemy two miles south of the town. Our division moved to the left through a broken country and came upon the enemy's right about night-fall. While in this position the enemy shelled our lines with some effect. The regiment had 1 man wounded. The same evening the Thirty-fift
Augustus G. Tassin (search for this): chapter 26
No. 22. report of Lieut. Col. Augustus G. Tassin, Thirty-fifth Indiana Infantry, of operations July I-September 8. Hdqrs. Thirty-Fifth Indiana Volunteers, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: In compliance with circular of September 10, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Thirty-fifth Regiment Indiana Infantry Volunteers during the recent campaign, from July 1, 1864, to the fall of Atlanta: On July 1 the regiment was stationed in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., occupying a reserve position in rear of the second line of our works. On the evening of the 2d the regiment changed position to the left with the brigade, taking the place of the Second Division, Fourth Corps, which moved out. The following morning, the enemy having evacuated their position on Kenesaw Mountain, the regiment took the line of march in pursuit, passing through Marietta, coming up again with the enemy about four miles south of that place. Here the brigade w
H. F. Temple (search for this): chapter 26
hrough Jonesborough, and came up with enemy two miles south of the town. Our division moved to the left through a broken country and came upon the enemy's right about night-fall. While in this position the enemy shelled our lines with some effect. The regiment had 1 man wounded. The same evening the Thirty-fifth supported the skirmish line, and on the following morning went into position on the left of the Forty-fifth Ohio in the front line. Remained in this position until the night of September 5, when agreeable to orders we quietly withdrew, moved back to Jonesborough, going into camp about 3 a. m. 6th instant. The following day moved to Rough and Ready, some ten miles from Jonesborough. Arrived in Atlanta on the 8th, and moving about one and a half miles northwest of town went into camp. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. G. Tassin, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding. Capt. H. F. Temple, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade.
September 10th (search for this): chapter 26
No. 22. report of Lieut. Col. Augustus G. Tassin, Thirty-fifth Indiana Infantry, of operations July I-September 8. Hdqrs. Thirty-Fifth Indiana Volunteers, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: In compliance with circular of September 10, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Thirty-fifth Regiment Indiana Infantry Volunteers during the recent campaign, from July 1, 1864, to the fall of Atlanta: On July 1 the regiment was stationed in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., occupying a reserve position in rear of the second line of our works. On the evening of the 2d the regiment changed position to the left with the brigade, taking the place of the Second Division, Fourth Corps, which moved out. The following morning, the enemy having evacuated their position on Kenesaw Mountain, the regiment took the line of march in pursuit, passing through Marietta, coming up again with the enemy about four miles south of that place. Here the brigade w
k fire, but the men unflinchingly held their ground until relieved by a portion of the Forty-fifth Ohio. I cannot speak too highly of the conduct of my officers and men on this occasion. Our total loss in the action, which lasted one hour and a half, was 4 enlisted men killed, and 6 wounded. On the following day we followed the retreating enemy to a point near the Chattahoochee River, where we remained in reserve until July 10, when with our division the regiment moved to the left, and on July 12 crossed the river, occupying a position in front of the Twenty-third Corps. We remained here until July 18, when the regiment was ordered to report to the corps supply train for duty. Nothing of importance transpired while with the train. On the 30th of August the regiment was relieved from duty with the train and ordered to report immediately to the brigade. Reported to the brigade on the sae day; found the troops to the rear of Atlanta. The same night the Thirty-fifth supported the
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