hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 1,463 127 Browse Search
John Newton 1,193 3 Browse Search
David S. Stanley 1,012 8 Browse Search
Thomas J. Wood 1,007 3 Browse Search
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) 693 51 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 681 9 Browse Search
J. M. Schofield 592 2 Browse Search
Resaca (Georgia, United States) 570 16 Browse Search
Marietta (Georgia, United States) 445 19 Browse Search
Oliver O. Howard 437 5 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

Found 91 total hits in 42 results.

1 2 3 4 5
Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
out 3 p. m. until after dark. I have to lament in this engagement the loss of Lieut. Thomas T. Keith, killed, and Lieut. George Allanson, severely wounded. The next morning the march was resumed, passing through Adairsville in the direction of Kingston, where we arrived without any interruption of movement on the 19th of May. Remained in camp near Kingston until the 23d of May, when the march was again resumed and continued without interruption until arriving in the vicinity of Dallas on the Kingston until the 23d of May, when the march was again resumed and continued without interruption until arriving in the vicinity of Dallas on the 25th. On the night of the 25th got into position; in the morning threw up works. Remained in this position eleven days, all the time under fire, men being killed and wounded in the most retired line of works. While in this position Lieut. George Coote was severely wounded. From the position in front of Dallas we moved toward Acworth, near which place I remained until the 10th of June. Nothing of moment occurred in my command until the 15th, on the night of which day we threw up works, w
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
r works, which were very hastily constructed, and were each time repulsed and driven back in great disorder. On the 21st I remained quiet all day, and on the 22d the enemy retired; we immediately pursued and got into position in the vicinity of Atlanta. Threw up works; remained here with a slight change of position until the 25th of August, on the night of which we retired from our position and marched toward the right; continued the march without anything of any moment occurring until the 1s Lieut. Fred. Schlenstedt, who was killed. On the morning of the 2d we advanced without opposition until near Lovejoy's Station. At this place went into position and remained here until the night of the 5th, when we retired in the direction of Atlanta, which place we arrived at on the 8th, and went into our present camp. I cannot speak too highly of the conduct of both officers and men throughout the long and tedious campaign, and I desire to make especial mention of Lieut. J. W. Clark, f
Calhoun, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
we were behind works not any one was injured. Toward noon I relieved some troops on the right of Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery. I retained this position until the next morning, when the fact was developed that the enemy had left our front. During the engagement Lieut. Col. T. S. West was wounded. This devolved the command upon myself. The line of march was immediately taken up in pursuit of the retiring enemy. Passing through Resaca, we camped on the night of the 16th near Calhoun, through which town we passed the next morning. Toward noon I relieved the Thirtieth Illinois in support of the skirmish line. The skirmishers advanced without any aid from me of any moment until within a few miles of Adairsville, Ga. Here the enemy displayed so strong a force that Colonel Barrett, commanding the skirmish line, requested me to deploy three companies on the right of the road to assist his line. In accordance with the request, I deployed Companies A, F, and D, under comman
Ackworth, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
d in camp near Kingston until the 23d of May, when the march was again resumed and continued without interruption until arriving in the vicinity of Dallas on the 25th. On the night of the 25th got into position; in the morning threw up works. Remained in this position eleven days, all the time under fire, men being killed and wounded in the most retired line of works. While in this position Lieut. George Coote was severely wounded. From the position in front of Dallas we moved toward Acworth, near which place I remained until the 10th of June. Nothing of moment occurred in my command until the 15th, on the night of which day we threw up works, which were abandoned on the 16th, and a new line constructed in advance. On the morning of the 17th it was again ascertained that the enemy had evacuated their position in our front. On the morning of the 18th advanced on the enemy by the right of companies to the front. This was accomplished with a great deal of difficulty, as the r
Adairsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
the 16th near Calhoun, through which town we passed the next morning. Toward noon I relieved the Thirtieth Illinois in support of the skirmish line. The skirmishers advanced without any aid from me of any moment until within a few miles of Adairsville, Ga. Here the enemy displayed so strong a force that Colonel Barrett, commanding the skirmish line, requested me to deploy three companies on the right of the road to assist his line. In accordance with the request, I deployed Companies A, F, anvery severe and lasted from about 3 p. m. until after dark. I have to lament in this engagement the loss of Lieut. Thomas T. Keith, killed, and Lieut. George Allanson, severely wounded. The next morning the march was resumed, passing through Adairsville in the direction of Kingston, where we arrived without any interruption of movement on the 19th of May. Remained in camp near Kingston until the 23d of May, when the march was again resumed and continued without interruption until arriving in
Kenesaw Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
On the morning of the 17th it was again ascertained that the enemy had evacuated their position in our front. On the morning of the 18th advanced on the enemy by the right of companies to the front. This was accomplished with a great deal of difficulty, as the rain was pouring in torrents and the ground to be passed over almost impassable on account of mud; during the day threw up works under fire. During the night the enemy again left their position; they were again developed near Kenesaw Mountain. The next morning (20th) works were constructed which were a valuable protection in the afternoon. During the day Capt. David Y. Horning, Company E, was wounded. During the evening I was relieved from my position by a portion of the Fourteenth Army Corps. From here I marched about one and a half miles toward the right. After getting into position works were immediately constructed. On the morning of the 22d I was ordered with my command on the skirmish line. In accordance with in
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
gn: On the 3d of May, 1864, the regiment rejoined the brigade while on the march, having for the previous three months been on duty at the headquarters Second Division. On the 9th we advanced and took position on Rocky Face Ridge in front of Dalton; remained in this position with some slight changes until the morning of the 13th, when it was ascertained that the enemy had evacuated their fortified position. We passed through Dalton and continued the march in the direction of Resaca, near Dalton and continued the march in the direction of Resaca, near which place the enemy were developed on the 14th. About 2 p. m. advanced with the brigade about 300 yards, when we debouched into an open field. Here we were exposed to galling fire of both artillery and small-arms. Receiving no orders to halt, the regiment advanced at a double-quick step toward a small elevation, behind which we took temporary shelter. After a short delay we advanced to the crest of the elevation and engaged the enemy. In crossing the field before mentioned the regiment be
Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
ve miles south of Marietta, where the enemy was found. This position was evacuated on the morning of the 5th of July. The line of march was immediately taken up in pursuit, and on the night of the 5th we camped on the north bank of the Chattahoochee River. Remained in this position with a slight change of camp until the 13th, on which day we crossed the Chattahoochee River and went into camp, where we remained until the 18th. On the night of the 19th crossed Peach Tree Creek and took posiChattahoochee River and went into camp, where we remained until the 18th. On the night of the 19th crossed Peach Tree Creek and took position near where the battle was fought the next day. The engagement of the 20th was a very brilliant affair, the enemy advancing on our works, which were very hastily constructed, and were each time repulsed and driven back in great disorder. On the 21st I remained quiet all day, and on the 22d the enemy retired; we immediately pursued and got into position in the vicinity of Atlanta. Threw up works; remained here with a slight change of position until the 25th of August, on the night of which
Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
orarily of Adjutant Horace Buchanan, who was quite severely wounded. On the night of the 27th I was on picket, on which tour of duty I lost several men wounded. I remained in the position behind the works until the 2d day of July, when I was relieved from my position and ordered to a position about a mile to the left of my former one. On the morning of the 3d it was again found that the enemy had left our front. The march was taken up and continued until about five miles south of Marietta, where the enemy was found. This position was evacuated on the morning of the 5th of July. The line of march was immediately taken up in pursuit, and on the night of the 5th we camped on the north bank of the Chattahoochee River. Remained in this position with a slight change of camp until the 13th, on which day we crossed the Chattahoochee River and went into camp, where we remained until the 18th. On the night of the 19th crossed Peach Tree Creek and took position near where the batt
Peach Tree Creek (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
ontinued until about five miles south of Marietta, where the enemy was found. This position was evacuated on the morning of the 5th of July. The line of march was immediately taken up in pursuit, and on the night of the 5th we camped on the north bank of the Chattahoochee River. Remained in this position with a slight change of camp until the 13th, on which day we crossed the Chattahoochee River and went into camp, where we remained until the 18th. On the night of the 19th crossed Peach Tree Creek and took position near where the battle was fought the next day. The engagement of the 20th was a very brilliant affair, the enemy advancing on our works, which were very hastily constructed, and were each time repulsed and driven back in great disorder. On the 21st I remained quiet all day, and on the 22d the enemy retired; we immediately pursued and got into position in the vicinity of Atlanta. Threw up works; remained here with a slight change of position until the 25th of August,
1 2 3 4 5