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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Camp Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
out with sixty rounds of cartridges and three days rations, moving to the rear and right, being on the left of the corps. The Twenty-seventh Illinois went to the rear to-day to be mustered out of service. After a tedious night's march, we halted about daybreak for breakfast. Formed line of battle at 8 a. m. and commenced fortifying. Moved to the right soon after; marched eight miles and camped on Utoy Creek. August 27, marched at 2 p. m. as rear guard, made about five miles and crossed Camp Creek, going into position on right of General Wood's division; occupied two hills in advance of the line and fortified. Marched at 4 p. m. of 28th about four miles, and camped near Montgomery railroad. On the 29th advanced our lines about half a mile and fortified. August 30, marched at 6 a. m. and crossed the Montgomery railroad near Red Oak. Moved east about six miles and formed line of battle on left of Kimball's division. On the 31st advanced several miles toward Macon railroad, form
Roswell, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
nd commenced fortifying. Discovered signs of the enemy withdrawing in the night; we advanced the picket at daylight in the morning, and found the works deserted. Marched at 8 a. m. of the 5th and took the line of railroad, following Vood's division. The enemy crossed the Chattahoochee, and we camped near Vining's Station, where we lay until the morning of the 7th, when we moved two miles to the left and camped. On the 9th marched at 6 a. m.. in advance of the division, fourteen miles to Roswell : after a short halt forded the Chattahoochee River and relieved Minty's brigade of cavalry. Next day, 10th, formed connection with the First Brigade and fortified. Were relieved this p. in. by a brigade of the Sixteenth Corps, and on the 11th crossed the Chattahoochee and camped. July 12, returned to old camp near Powers' Ferry, and on the morning of 13th crossed the river at Powers' Ferry and camped about three miles out, putting brigade in position in two lines and constructing wo
Adairsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
heavy skirmishing, having the Twentyseventh and Forty-second Illinois in the skirmish line, supported by Third Kentucky and Sixty-fourth Ohio. Reached Calhoun at 6 p. m. and camped. Marched at 6 a. m. of the 17th and reached neighborhood of Adairsville at 4 p. m., formed line of battle on left of division, and bivouacked in same order at dark. Left camp at 6 a. m. of the 18th instant in advance, the Twenty-second Illinois as skirmishers. Reached Adairsville at 10 a. m., and halted until noAdairsville at 10 a. m., and halted until noon. Marched down the railroad about six miles and camped. May 19, marched at 7 a. m. and reached Kingston at noon. Halted two hours, when we marched out and formed line of battle on a range of hills looking south. Moved from here about 4 p. m. and formed about two miles from town, where we camped. On the 20th we moved back to the mill on Movine Creek and camped, remaining here until 1 p. m. of the 23d, when we marched south, crossing the Etowah at dark, and camping about six miles south of
Buck Head (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
ks. From this time to the 18th remained in this position, sending regiments to the river every day for fatigue duty. On the morning of the 18th marched at 6 a. m. on the Atlanta road, having the advance of the corps; met a brigade of rebel cavalry with four pieces of artillery, on the road, and skirmished all day. Colonel Opdycke, with the Sixty-fifth and One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio and Third Kentucky, drove them all day, crossing Nancy's Creek under fire, and pressing them back to Buck Head, where we went into camp. July 19, sent out Sixty-fourth Ohio and Seventyninth Illinois to picket roads, and marched about dark, and camped on Peach Tree Creek. On the morning of the 20th we moved at 6 a. m. and crossed two regiments over the creek, relieving a part of Hazen's brigade, and occupying their works. About noon crossed over the balance of the brigade, and at 2 p. m. advanced, following the First and Second Brigades on the Atlanta road, where they formed across the road about
Rocky Face (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
es and built a strong line of earth-works. The Forty-second Illinois Infantry and Sixty-fifth Ohio Infantry joined the brigade on return from veteran furlough on the 6th instant, and we remained in the same position until the morning of the 7th instant, when we marched for Tunnel Hill, reaching camp near that place about 3 p. m. The brigade numbered to-day 2,325 muskets. On the morning of the 8th we marched at 6 a. m., and halted about one and a half miles out, near the mountain named as Rocky Face. General Harker directed Colonel Opdycke, One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, to scale the side of the mountain and try and effect a lodgment on the ridge, supposed to be in possession of the enemy. Colonel Opdycke carried the ridge very handsomely, after an hour or two of severe skirmishing, and drove the enemy half a mile along the ridge into his defenses, which were too strong to be carried. The Sixty-fifth Ohio ascended the mountain with the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohi
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
the ridge with division and marched to the left to occupy a pass from which the Twenty-third Corps had retired, formed, and went into camp. About noon threw up works, expecting an attack; lay under arms all day, and camped at dark. Marched for Dalton early on the morning of the 13th, the enemy having evacuated in the night. Halted at Dalton an hour at noon, and marched about eight miles in afternoon and camped. May 14, marched at 5.30 a. m.; halted at 9 and formed in line of battle; brigadeDalton an hour at noon, and marched about eight miles in afternoon and camped. May 14, marched at 5.30 a. m.; halted at 9 and formed in line of battle; brigade in reserve; moved to the front and left, and about 5 p. m. were ordered to relieve a portion of the Twenty-third Corps, then engaged in front. Advanced in two lines, coming under fire of the enemy's guns several hundred yards before going into action, and suffered severely. We relieved a brigade of Cox's division, and immediately became hotly engaged. General Harker was severely wounded soon after going in, and turned over the brigade to me. I directed Colonel Opdycke to take charge of the f
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
d out of service. After a tedious night's march, we halted about daybreak for breakfast. Formed line of battle at 8 a. m. and commenced fortifying. Moved to the right soon after; marched eight miles and camped on Utoy Creek. August 27, marched at 2 p. m. as rear guard, made about five miles and crossed Camp Creek, going into position on right of General Wood's division; occupied two hills in advance of the line and fortified. Marched at 4 p. m. of 28th about four miles, and camped near Montgomery railroad. On the 29th advanced our lines about half a mile and fortified. August 30, marched at 6 a. m. and crossed the Montgomery railroad near Red Oak. Moved east about six miles and formed line of battle on left of Kimball's division. On the 31st advanced several miles toward Macon railroad, formed line, and fortified three times. About dark [took] position on right of Grose's brigade, and camped. September 1, marched at 7 a. m. and struck Macon railroad near Battle Station; com
Cleveland, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
seventh, Fifty-first, and Seventy-ninth Illinois Infantry, and the Sixty-fourth and One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, and the Third Kentucky Infantry, numbering about 2,000 muskets, under the command of Brig. Gen. C. G. Harker-left Cleveland, Tenn., with the division at 1 p. m. May 3, 1864, marched to Red Clay, ten miles, and camped. We broke camp at 6 a. in. of the 4th, marched about twelve miles, halted at 3 p. m., and went into camp about dark near Catoosa Springs. On the morningpulsed with heavy loss. At dark the brigade was relieved by General Wagner's brigade, and retired about half a mile, where it bivouacked. We lay in the same position during the 10th and 11th. The Twenty-second Illinois, which was detailed at Cleveland as train guard, rejoined the brigade to-day. On the morning of the 12th moved off the ridge with division and marched to the left to occupy a pass from which the Twenty-third Corps had retired, formed, and went into camp. About noon threw up
Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
the enemy withdrawing in the night; we advanced the picket at daylight in the morning, and found the works deserted. Marched at 8 a. m. of the 5th and took the line of railroad, following Vood's division. The enemy crossed the Chattahoochee, and we camped near Vining's Station, where we lay until the morning of the 7th, when we moved two miles to the left and camped. On the 9th marched at 6 a. m.. in advance of the division, fourteen miles to Roswell : after a short halt forded the Chattahoochee River and relieved Minty's brigade of cavalry. Next day, 10th, formed connection with the First Brigade and fortified. Were relieved this p. in. by a brigade of the Sixteenth Corps, and on the 11th crossed the Chattahoochee and camped. July 12, returned to old camp near Powers' Ferry, and on the morning of 13th crossed the river at Powers' Ferry and camped about three miles out, putting brigade in position in two lines and constructing works. From this time to the 18th remained in t
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
every day for fatigue duty. On the morning of the 18th marched at 6 a. m. on the Atlanta road, having the advance of the corps; met a brigade of rebel cavalry with four pieces of artillery, on the road, and skirmished all day. Colonel Opdycke, with the Sixty-fifth and One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio and Third Kentucky, drove them all day, crossing Nancy's Creek under fire, and pressing them back to Buck Head, where we went into camp. July 19, sent out Sixty-fourth Ohio and Seventyninth Illinois to picket roads, and marched about dark, and camped on Peach Tree Creek. On the morning of the 20th we moved at 6 a. m. and crossed two regiments over the creek, relieving a part of Hazen's brigade, and occupying their works. About noon crossed over the balance of the brigade, and at 2 p. m. advanced, following the First and Second Brigades on the Atlanta road, where they formed across the road about half a mile from the creek. My brigade was massed in column of regiments in rear of Kimb
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