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Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
the army unite with Sheridan's troops in swinging round more toward the south and heading off Lee in that direction. The next day (April 6) proved a decided field-day in the pursuit. It was found in the morning that Lee had retreated during the night from Amelia Court-house; and from the direction he had taken, and information received that he had ordered rations to meet him at Farmville, it was seen that he had abandoned all hope of reaching Burkeville, and was probably heading for Lynchburg. Ord was to try to burn the High Bridge over the Appomattox, and push on to Farmville. Sheridan's cavalry was to work around Lee's left flank, and the Army of the Potomac was to make another forced march, and strike the enemy wherever it could reach him. I spent a portion of the day with Humphreys's corps, which attacked the enemy near Deatonsville and gave his rear-guard no rest. I joined General Grant later, and rode with him to Burkeville, getting there some time after dark. Ord
Amelia Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
old town tavern, and while examining maps and discussing the movements a ringing despatch came in from Sheridan saying he had captured six guns and some wagons, and had intercepted Lee's advance toward Burkeville; that Lee was in person at Amelia Court-house, etc. This news was given to the passing troops, and lusty cheers went up from every throat. They had marched about fifteen miles already that day, and now struck out as if they were good for fifteen more, and vowed that they were going toSheridan's troops in swinging round more toward the south and heading off Lee in that direction. The next day (April 6) proved a decided field-day in the pursuit. It was found in the morning that Lee had retreated during the night from Amelia Court-house; and from the direction he had taken, and information received that he had ordered rations to meet him at Farmville, it was seen that he had abandoned all hope of reaching Burkeville, and was probably heading for Lynchburg. Ord was to try
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
hat in acknowledgment of the cheers, and gave a pleasant nod to each of the men who addressed him. A little before noon on April 7, 1865, General Grant, with his staff, rode into the little village of Farmville, on the south side of the Appomattox River, a town that will be memorable in history as the place where he opened the correspondence with Lee which, two days later, led to the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. He drew up in front of the village hotel, a comfortable brick bLee would do, but he hoped that he would at once surrender his army. This statement, together with the news that had been received from Sheridan, saying that he had heard that General Lee's trains of provisions, which had come by rail, were at Appomattox, and that he expected to capture them before Lee could reach them, induced the general to write the following communication: Headquarters, Armies of the U. S., 5 P. M., April 7, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A.: The results of t
Burkeville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
the Potomac; while Ord was swinging along toward Burkeville to head off Lee from Danville, to which point it ted that Davis and his cabinet had passed through Burkeville, on their way south, early on the morning of the ed Nottoway Court-house, about ten miles east of Burkeville, where he halted with Ord for a couple of hours. wagons, and had intercepted Lee's advance toward Burkeville; that Lee was in person at Amelia Court-house, etached a point about half-way between Nottoway and Burkeville. The road was skirted by a dense woods on the nosage to Ord to watch the roads running south from Burkeville and Farmville, and then went over to Meade's camps seen that he had abandoned all hope of reaching Burkeville, and was probably heading for Lynchburg. Ord was joined General Grant later, and rode with him to Burkeville, getting there some time after dark. Ord had rally. General Grant broke camp and started from Burkeville early the next morning (the 7th), and moved rapid
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
a point about half-way between Nottoway and Burkeville. The road was skirted by a dense woods on the north side — the side toward the enemy. A commotion suddenly arose among the headquarters escort, and on looking round, I saw some of our men dashing up to a horseman in full Confederate uniform, who had emerged like an apparition from the woods, and in the act of seizing him as a prisoner. I recognized him at once as the scout who had brought the important despatch sent by Sheridan from Columbia to City Point. I said to him, How do you do, Campbell? and told our men he was all right, and was one of our people. He said he had had a hard ride from Sheridan's camp, and had brought a despatch for General Grant. By this time the general had also recognized him, and had ridden up to him and halted in the road to see what he had brought. Campbell took from his mouth a small pellet of tin-foil, opened it, and pulled out a sheet of tissue-paper, on which was written the famous despatch
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ers to meet any officers you may name for the same purpose, at any point agreeable to you, for the purpose of arranging definitely the terms upon which the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia will be received. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-general. The last sentence shows great delicacy of feeling on the part of General Grant, who wished to spare General Lee the mortification of personally conducting the surrender. The consideration displayed has a parallel in the terms accorded by Washington to Cornwallis at Yorktown. Cornwallis took advantage of the privilege, and sent O'Hara to represent him; but Lee rose superior to the British general, and in a manly way came and conducted the surrender in person. There turned up at this time a rather hungry-looking gentleman in gray, wearing the uniform of a colonel, who proclaimed himself the proprietor of the hotel. He gave us to understand that his regiment had crumbled to pieces; that he was about the only portion of it that had
Sailor's Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
work around Lee's left flank, and the Army of the Potomac was to make another forced march, and strike the enemy wherever it could reach him. I spent a portion of the day with Humphreys's corps, which attacked the enemy near Deatonsville and gave his rear-guard no rest. I joined General Grant later, and rode with him to Burkeville, getting there some time after dark. Ord had pushed out to Rice's Station, and Sheridan and Wright had gone in against the enemy and fought the battle of Sailor's Creek, capturing 6 general officers and about 7000 men, and smashing things generally. General Grant broke camp and started from Burkeville early the next morning (the 7th), and moved rapidly in the direction of Farmville. The columns were crowding the roads, and the men, aroused to still greater efforts by the inspiriting news of the day before, were sweeping steadily along, despite the rain that fell, like trained pedestrians on a walking-track. As the general rode among them he was greet
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
Grant and Meade both went into camp at Sutherland's Station that evening (April 3). The Army of the Potomac caught but a few hours' sleep, and at three the next morning was again on the march. The pursuit had now become swift, unflagging, relentless. Sheridan, the inevitable, as the enemy had learned to call him, was in advance, thundering on with his cavalry, followed by Griffin and the rest of the Army of the Potomac; while Ord was swinging along toward Burkeville to head off Lee from Danville, to which point it was naturally supposed he was pushing in order to unite with Joe Johnston's army. April 4 was another active day; the troops were made to realize that this campaign was to be won by legs; that the great walking-match had begun, and success depended upon which army could make the best distance record. Grant rode this day with Ord's troops. Meade was quite sick, and had to take at times to an ambulance; but his loyal spirit never flagged, and all his orders breathed the
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
t half-way between Nottoway and Burkeville. The road was skirted by a dense woods on the north side — the side toward the enemy. A commotion suddenly arose among the headquarters escort, and on looking round, I saw some of our men dashing up to a horseman in full Confederate uniform, who had emerged like an apparition from the woods, and in the act of seizing him as a prisoner. I recognized him at once as the scout who had brought the important despatch sent by Sheridan from Columbia to City Point. I said to him, How do you do, Campbell? and told our men he was all right, and was one of our people. He said he had had a hard ride from Sheridan's camp, and had brought a despatch for General Grant. By this time the general had also recognized him, and had ridden up to him and halted in the road to see what he had brought. Campbell took from his mouth a small pellet of tin-foil, opened it, and pulled out a sheet of tissue-paper, on which was written the famous despatch, so widely p
Nottoway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ville; that Lee was in person at Amelia Court-house, etc. This news was given to the passing troops, and lusty cheers went up from every throat. They had marched about fifteen miles already that day, and now struck out as if they were good for fifteen more, and vowed that they were going to beat the record of the cavalry. We continued to move along the wagon-road which runs parallel to the South Side Railroad till nearly dark, and had by that time reached a point about half-way between Nottoway and Burkeville. The road was skirted by a dense woods on the north side — the side toward the enemy. A commotion suddenly arose among the headquarters escort, and on looking round, I saw some of our men dashing up to a horseman in full Confederate uniform, who had emerged like an apparition from the woods, and in the act of seizing him as a prisoner. I recognized him at once as the scout who had brought the important despatch sent by Sheridan from Columbia to City Point. I said to him,
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