hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 948 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 583 5 Browse Search
Sheridan 470 8 Browse Search
Sam Grant 374 0 Browse Search
Billy Sherman 355 1 Browse Search
W. S. Hancock 330 0 Browse Search
Meade 325 43 Browse Search
Halleck Grant 294 0 Browse Search
Warren 252 4 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 242 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant. Search the whole document.

Found 292 total hits in 63 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Farmville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ride to reach Sheridan Grant Hurries on to Farmville Grant at Farmville Grant Opens a corresponFarmville Grant Opens a correspondence with Lee the ride to Curdsville Grant Suffers an attack of illness more correspondence wit the roads running south from Burkeville and Farmville, and then went over to Meade's camp near by.d that he had ordered rations to meet him at Farmville, it was seen that he had abandoned all hope h Bridge over the Appomattox, and push on to Farmville. Sheridan's cavalry was to work around Lee' 7th), and moved rapidly in the direction of Farmville. The columns were crowding the roads, and th his staff, rode into the little village of Farmville, on the south side of the Appomattox River, General Grant decided to remain all night at Farmville and await the reply from Lee, and he was shoe U. S. The next morning, before leaving Farmville, the following reply was given to General Seuctions to Ord and Sheridan, he started from Farmville, crossed to the north side of the Appomattox
) (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
this time the general had also recognized him, and had ridden up to him and halted in the road to see what he had brought. Campbell took from his mouth a small pellet of tin-foil, opened it, and pulled out a sheet of tissue-paper, on which was written the famous despatch, so widely published at the time, in which Sheridan described the situation at Jetersville, and added, I wish you were here yourself. The general said he would go at once to Sheridan, and dismounted from his black pony Jeff Davis, which he had been riding, and called for his horse Cincinnati. He stood in the road for a few minutes, and wrote a despatch to Ord, using the pony's back for a desk, and then, mounting the fresh horse, told Campbell to lead the way. It was found that we would have to skirt pretty closely to the enemy's lines, and it was thought that it would be prudent to take some cavalry with us; but there was none near at hand, and the general said he would risk it with our mounted escort of fourteen
Jetersville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
e had brought. Campbell took from his mouth a small pellet of tin-foil, opened it, and pulled out a sheet of tissue-paper, on which was written the famous despatch, so widely published at the time, in which Sheridan described the situation at Jetersville, and added, I wish you were here yourself. The general said he would go at once to Sheridan, and dismounted from his black pony Jeff Davis, which he had been riding, and called for his horse Cincinnati. He stood in the road for a few minuthat night headquarters were established at Curdsville in a large white farm-house a few hundred yards from Meade's camp. The general and several of the staff had cut loose from the headquarters trains the night he started to meet Sheridan at Jetersville, and had neither baggage nor camp equipage. The general did not even have his sword with him. This was the most advanced effort yet made in moving in light-marching order, and we billeted ourselves at night in farm-houses, or bivouacked on po
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
u may name for the same purpose, at any point agreeable to you, for the purpose of arranging definitely the terms upon which the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia will be received. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-general. The last sentence shows great delicacy of feeling on the part of General Grant, who wished to spare General Lee the mortification of personally conducting the surrender. The consideration displayed has a parallel in the terms accorded by Washington to Cornwallis at Yorktown. Cornwallis took advantage of the privilege, and sent O'Hara to represent him; but Lee rose superior to the British general, and in a manly way came and conducted the surrender in person. There turned up at this time a rather hungry-looking gentleman in gray, wearing the uniform of a colonel, who proclaimed himself the proprietor of the hotel. He gave us to understand that his regiment had crumbled to pieces; that he was about the only portion of it that had succeeded in holding toget
Curdsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
Chapter 29 Grant Enters Petersburg Lincoln at Petersburg in hot pursuit of Lee Grant makes a night ride to reach Sheridan Grant Hurries on to Farmville Grant at Farmville Grant Opens a correspondence with Lee the ride to Curdsville Grant Suffers an attack of illness more correspondence with Lee The general was up at daylight the next morning, and the first report brought in was that Parke had gone through the lines at 4 A. M., capturing a few skirmishers, and that the cityctions to Ord and Sheridan, he started from Farmville, crossed to the north side of the Appomattox, conferred in person with Meade, and rode with his columns. Encouraging reports came in all day, and that night headquarters were established at Curdsville in a large white farm-house a few hundred yards from Meade's camp. The general and several of the staff had cut loose from the headquarters trains the night he started to meet Sheridan at Jetersville, and had neither baggage nor camp equipage.
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
p to him and halted in the road to see what he had brought. Campbell took from his mouth a small pellet of tin-foil, opened it, and pulled out a sheet of tissue-paper, on which was written the famous despatch, so widely published at the time, in which Sheridan described the situation at Jetersville, and added, I wish you were here yourself. The general said he would go at once to Sheridan, and dismounted from his black pony Jeff Davis, which he had been riding, and called for his horse Cincinnati. He stood in the road for a few minutes, and wrote a despatch to Ord, using the pony's back for a desk, and then, mounting the fresh horse, told Campbell to lead the way. It was found that we would have to skirt pretty closely to the enemy's lines, and it was thought that it would be prudent to take some cavalry with us; but there was none near at hand, and the general said he would risk it with our mounted escort of fourteen men. Calling upon me and three other officers to accompany him
Headquarters (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
this somebody would be responsible, and it would be little better than murder. He could not tell what General Lee would do, but he hoped that he would at once surrender his army. This statement, together with the news that had been received from Sheridan, saying that he had heard that General Lee's trains of provisions, which had come by rail, were at Appomattox, and that he expected to capture them before Lee could reach them, induced the general to write the following communication: Headquarters, Armies of the U. S., 5 P. M., April 7, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A.: The results of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the Army of Northern Virginia. U. S. Gra
Namozine Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
looking brick house with a yard in front, No. 21 Market street, the residence of Mr. Thomas Wallace, and here he and the staff dismounted and took seats on the piazza. A number of the citizens now gathered on the sidewalk, and stood gazing with eager curiosity upon the features of the commander of the Yankee armies. Soon an officer came with a despatch from Sheridan, who had been reinforced and ordered to strike out along the Danville Railroad, saying he was already nine miles beyond Namozine Creek, and pressing the enemy's trains. The general was anxious to move westward at once with the leading infantry columns, but he prolonged his stay until the President came up. Mr. Lincoln soon after arrived, accompanied by Robert, who had ridden back to the railroad-station to meet him, and by his little son, Tad, and Admiral Porter. He dismounted in the street, and came in through the front gate with long and rapid strides, his face beaming with delight. He seized General Grant's ha
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
th Grant as the reviewing officer. Ord and Gibbon had visited the general at the hotel, and he had spoken with them, as well as with Wright, about sending some communication to Lee that might pave the way to the stopping of further bloodshed. Dr. Smith, formerly of the regular army, a native of Virginia, and a relative of General Ewell, now one of our prisoners, had told General Grant the night before that Ewell had said in conversation that their cause was lost when they crossed the James River, and he considered that it was the duty of the authorities to negotiate for peace then, while they still had a right to claim concessions. adding that now they were not in condition to claim anything. He said that for every man killed after this somebody would be responsible, and it would be little better than murder. He could not tell what General Lee would do, but he hoped that he would at once surrender his army. This statement, together with the news that had been received from Sh
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 29
them before Lee could reach them, induced the general to write the following communication: Headquarters, Armies of the U. S., 5 P. M., April 7, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A.: The results of the last week must convince you of them myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the Army of Northern Virginia. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-general. This he intrusted to General Set-namely, that the men and officers surrendered shall be disqualified for taking up arms against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged. I will meet you, or will designate officers to meet any officers you may name for the samerefore, meet you with a view to surrender the Army of Northern Virginia; but as far as your proposal may effect the Confederate States forces under my command, and tend to the restoration of peace, I shall be pleased to meet you at 10 A. M. to-morrow
1 2 3 4 5 6 7