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St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
kely to involve us in a war with European powers. Under the circumstances, my disappointment at not being permitted to participate in the review had to be submitted to, and I left Washington without an opportunity of seeing again in a body the men who, while under my command, had gone through so many trials and unremittingly pursued and assailed the enemy, from the beginning of the campaign of 1864 till the white flag came into their hands at Appomattox Court House. I went first to St. Louis, and there took the steamboat for New Orleans, and when near the mouth of the Red River received word from General Canby that Kirby Smith had surrendered under terms similar to those accorded Lee and Johnston. But the surrender was not carried out in good faith, particularly by the Texas troops, though this I did not learn till some little time afterward, when I was informed that they had marched off to the interior of the State in several organized bodies, carrying with them their camp
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
of cavalry, directing one to San Antonio under Merritt, the other to Houston under Custer. Both commands were to start from the Red River-Shreveport and Alexandria being the respective initial points-and in organizing the columns, to the mounted force already on the Red River were added several regiments of cavalry from the east bank of the Mississippi, and in a singular way one of these fell upon the trail of my old antagonist, General Early. While crossing the river somewhere below Vicksburg some of the men noticed a suspicious looking party being ferried over in a rowboat, behind which two horses were swimming in tow. Chase was given, and the horses, being abandoned by the party, fell into the hands of our troopers, who, however, failed to capture or identify the people in the boat. As subsequently ascertained, the men were companions of Early, who was already across the Mississippi, hidden in the woods, on his way with two or three of these followers to join the Confederate
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 34
the command West of the Mississippi leaving Washington flight of General Early Maximilian making, from which place I proceeded by steamer to Washington, leading the cavalry to be marched thither beasy stages. The day after my arrival in Washington an important order was sent me, accompanied eadquarters armies of the United States. Washington, D. C., May 17, 1865. General: Under the ordd so pressing as to preclude my remaining in Washington till after the Grand Review, which was fixedhe review had to be submitted to, and I left Washington without an opportunity of seeing again in a is most trusty men, whom I had had sent from Washington. From Brownsville I despatched all these meof representations of the French Minister at Washington. In October, he wrote to Mr. Seward that thn me concerning the desire of the Cabinet at Washington to preserve the most strict neutrality in th and he, thinking General Caravajal (then in Washington seeking aid for the Republic) would answer
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
and Vera Cruz were being fortified; then, that the French were to be withdrawn; and later came the intelligence that the Empress Carlotta had gone home to beg assistance from Napoleon, the author of all of her husband's troubles. But the situation forced Napoleon to turn a deaf ear to Carlotta's prayers. The broken-hearted woman besought him on her knees, but his fear of losing an army made all pleadings vain. In fact, as I ascertained by the following cablegram which came into my hands, Napoleon's instructions for the French evacuation were in Mexico at the very time of this pathetic scene between him and Carlotta. The despatch was in cipher when I received it, but was translated by the telegraph operator at my headquarters, who long before had mastered the key of the French cipher: Paris, January 10, 1867. French Consul, New Orleans, La. To General Castelnau, at Mexico. Received your despatch of the 9th December. Do not compel the Emperor to abdicate, but do not delay t
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
knees, but his fear of losing an army made all pleadings vain. In fact, as I ascertained by the following cablegram which came into my hands, Napoleon's instructions for the French evacuation were in Mexico at the very time of this pathetic scene between him and Carlotta. The despatch was in cipher when I received it, but was translated by the telegraph operator at my headquarters, who long before had mastered the key of the French cipher: Paris, January 10, 1867. French Consul, New Orleans, La. To General Castelnau, at Mexico. Received your despatch of the 9th December. Do not compel the Emperor to abdicate, but do not delay the departure of the troops; bring back all those who will not remain there. Most of the fleet has left. Napoleon. This meant the immediate withdrawal of the French. The rest of the story — which has necessarily been but an outline — is soon told. Maximilian, though deserted, determined to hold out to the last, and with the aid of disloyal
Camargo (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
er west of the Mississippi-holding intercourse with him in person, or through such officers of the rank of major-general as you may select — that he will be allowed to surrender all his forces on the same terms as were accorded to Lee and Johnston. If he accedes, proceed to garrison the Red River as high up as Shreveport, the seaboard at Galveston, Malagorda Bay, Corpus Christi, and mouth of the Rio Grande. Place a strong force on the Rio Grande, holding it at least to a point opposite Camargo, and above that if supplies can be procured. In case of an active campaign (a hostile one) I think a heavy force should be put on the Rio Grande as a first preliminary. Troops for this might be started at once. The Twenty-Fifth Corps is now available, and to it should be added a force of white troops, say those now under Major-General Steele. To be clear on this last point, I think the Rio Grande should be strongly held, whether the forces in Texas surrender or not, and that no ti
Shreveport (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
r through such officers of the rank of major-general as you may select — that he will be allowed to surrender all his forces on the same terms as were accorded to Lee and Johnston. If he accedes, proceed to garrison the Red River as high up as Shreveport, the seaboard at Galveston, Malagorda Bay, Corpus Christi, and mouth of the Rio Grande. Place a strong force on the Rio Grande, holding it at least to a point opposite Camargo, and above that if supplies can be procured. In case of an aovernment to make a strong showing of force in Texas, I decided to traverse the State with two columns of cavalry, directing one to San Antonio under Merritt, the other to Houston under Custer. Both commands were to start from the Red River-Shreveport and Alexandria being the respective initial points-and in organizing the columns, to the mounted force already on the Red River were added several regiments of cavalry from the east bank of the Mississippi, and in a singular way one of these fe
Corpus Christi (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
the only Government having an existence over the territory where war is now being waged. You may notify the rebel commander west of the Mississippi-holding intercourse with him in person, or through such officers of the rank of major-general as you may select — that he will be allowed to surrender all his forces on the same terms as were accorded to Lee and Johnston. If he accedes, proceed to garrison the Red River as high up as Shreveport, the seaboard at Galveston, Malagorda Bay, Corpus Christi, and mouth of the Rio Grande. Place a strong force on the Rio Grande, holding it at least to a point opposite Camargo, and above that if supplies can be procured. In case of an active campaign (a hostile one) I think a heavy force should be put on the Rio Grande as a first preliminary. Troops for this might be started at once. The Twenty-Fifth Corps is now available, and to it should be added a force of white troops, say those now under Major-General Steele. To be clear on
Indianola (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
troops into Texas--in fact, to concentrate at available points in the State an army strong enough to move against the invaders of Mexico if occasion demanded. The Fourth and Twenty-fifth army corps being ordered to report to me accordingly, I sent the Fourth Corps to Victoria and San Antonio, and the bulk of the Twenty-fifth to Brownsville. Then came the feeding and caring for all these troops — a difficult matter-for those at Victoria and San Antonio had to be provisioned overland from Indianola across the hog-wallow prairie, while the supplies for the forces at Brownsville and along the Rio Grande must come by way of Brazos Santiago, from which point I was obliged to construct, with the labor of the men, a railroad to Clarksville, a distance of about eighteen miles. The latter part of June I repaired to Brownsville myself to impress the Imperialists, as much as possible, with the idea that we intended hostilities, and took along my chief of scouts-Major Young-and four of his
Murdoch (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
ulted in alarming the Imperialists so much that they withdrew the French and Austrian soldiers from Matamoras, and practically abandoned the whole of northern Mexico as far down as Monterey, with the exception of Matamoras, where General MeJia continued to hang on with a garrison of renegade Mexicans. The abandonment of so much territory in northern Mexico encouraged General Escobedo and other Liberal leaders to such a degree that they collected a considerable army of their followers at Comargo, Mier, and other points. At the same time that unknown quantity, Cortinas, suspended his freebooting for the nonce, and stoutly harassing Matamoras, succeeded in keeping its Imperial garrison within the fortifications. Thus countenanced and stimulated, and largely supplied with arms and ammunition, which we left at convenient places on our side of the river to fall into their hands, the Liberals, under General Escobedo--a man of much force of character — were enabled in northern Mexico to
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