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Port Isabel (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
th rheumatism. By the time the two columns were ready to set out for San Antonio and Houston, General Frank Herron, with and division of the Thirteenth Corps, occupied Galveston, and another division under General Fred Steele had gone to Brazos Santiago, to hold Brownsville and the line of the Rio Grande, the object being to prevent, as far as possible, the escaping Confederates from joining Maximilian. With this purpose in view, and not forgetting Grant's conviction that the French invasihese troops — a difficult matter-for those at Victoria and San Antonio had to be provisioned overland from Indianola across the hog-wallow prairie, while the supplies for the forces at Brownsville and along the Rio Grande must come by way of Brazos Santiago, from which point I was obliged to construct, with the labor of the men, a railroad to Clarksville, a distance of about eighteen miles. The latter part of June I repaired to Brownsville myself to impress the Imperialists, as much as poss
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 34
his, and also because of the desire of the Government to make a strong showing of force in Texas, I decided to traverse the State with two columns of cavalry, directing one to San Antonio under Merritt, the other to Houston under Custer. Both commands were to start from the Red River-Shreveport and Alexandria being the respective initial points-and in organizing the columns, to the mounted force already on the Red River were added several regiments of cavalry from the east bank of the Mississippi, and in a singular way one of these fell upon the trail of my old antagonist, General Early. While crossing the river somewhere below Vicksburg some of the men noticed a suspicious looking party being ferried over in a rowboat, behind which two horses were swimming in tow. Chase was given, and the horses, being abandoned by the party, fell into the hands of our troopers, who, however, failed to capture or identify the people in the boat. As subsequently ascertained, the men were compani
Meadow Mills (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
necessity of the situation. This action of the President gave the Imperialists little concern at first, but with the revival of the Liberal cause they availed themselves of every means to divide its supporters, and Ortega, who had been lying low in the United States, now came forward to claim the Presidency. Though ridiculously late for such a step, his first act was to issue a manifesto protesting against the assumption of the ex- Belle-Grove House, General Sheridan's headquarters at Cedar Creek. ecutive authority by Juarez. The protest had little effect, however, and his next proceeding was to come to New Orleans, get into correspondence with other disaffected Mexicans, and thus perfect his plans. When he thought his intrigue ripe enough for action, he sailed for Brazos, intending to cross the Rio Grande and assert his claims with arms. While he was scheming in New Orleans, however, I had learned what he was up to, and in advance of his departure had sent instructions to hav
h, it was often very difficult to restrain officers and men from crossing the Rio Grande with hostile purpose. Within the knowledge of my troops, there had gone on formerly the transfer of organized bodies of ex-Confederates to Mexico, in aid of the Imperialists, and at this period it was known that there was in preparation an immigration scheme having in view the colonizing, at Cordova and one or two other places, of all the discontented elements of the defunct Confederacy-Generals Price, Magruder, Maury, and other high personages being promoters of the enterprise, which Maximilian took to readily. He saw in it the possibilities of a staunch support to his throne, and therefore not only sanctioned the project, but encouraged it with large grants of land, inspirited the promoters with titles of nobility, and, in addition, instituted a system of peonage, expecting that the silver hook thus baited would be largely swallowed by the Southern people. The announcement of the scheme was
Frank Herron (search for this): chapter 34
communication reached me. The unfortunate man was fleeing from imaginary dangers, however, for striking his trail was purely accidental, and no effort whatever was being made to arrest him personally. Had this been specially desired it might have been accomplished very readily just after Lee's surrender, for it was an open secret that Early was then not far away, pretty badly disabled with rheumatism. By the time the two columns were ready to set out for San Antonio and Houston, General Frank Herron, with and division of the Thirteenth Corps, occupied Galveston, and another division under General Fred Steele had gone to Brazos Santiago, to hold Brownsville and the line of the Rio Grande, the object being to prevent, as far as possible, the escaping Confederates from joining Maximilian. With this purpose in view, and not forgetting Grant's conviction that the French invasion of Mexico was linked with the rebellion, I asked for an increase of force to send troops into Texas--in f
ng the lower Rio Grande, and at the same time demanded the return of certain munitions of war that had been turned over by ex-Confederates to the Imperial General (Mejia) commanding at Matamoras. These demands, backed up as they were by such a formidable show of force, created much agitation and demoralization among the Imperial tch and Austrian soldiers from Matamoras, and practically abandoned the whole of northern Mexico as far down as Monterey, with the exception of Matamoras, where General MeJia continued to hang on with a garrison of renegade Mexicans. The abandonment of so much territory in northern Mexico encouraged General Escobedo and other Liorizing him to cross into Mexico, and followed him myself by the next boat. When I arrived in Brownsville, matters in Matamoras had already reached a crisis. General Mejia, feeling keenly the moral support we were giving the Liberals, and hard pressed by the harassing attacks of Cortinas and Canales, had abandoned the place, and
Redwood Price (search for this): chapter 34
and, in truth, it was often very difficult to restrain officers and men from crossing the Rio Grande with hostile purpose. Within the knowledge of my troops, there had gone on formerly the transfer of organized bodies of ex-Confederates to Mexico, in aid of the Imperialists, and at this period it was known that there was in preparation an immigration scheme having in view the colonizing, at Cordova and one or two other places, of all the discontented elements of the defunct Confederacy-Generals Price, Magruder, Maury, and other high personages being promoters of the enterprise, which Maximilian took to readily. He saw in it the possibilities of a staunch support to his throne, and therefore not only sanctioned the project, but encouraged it with large grants of land, inspirited the promoters with titles of nobility, and, in addition, instituted a system of peonage, expecting that the silver hook thus baited would be largely swallowed by the Southern people. The announcement of t
Custis Lee (search for this): chapter 34
orps having reached Danville meanwhile. At South Boston I received a despatch from General Halleck, who immediately after Lee's surrender had been assigned to command at Richmond, informing me that General Johnston had been brought to terms. The najor-general as you may select — that he will be allowed to surrender all his forces on the same terms as were accorded to Lee and Johnston. If he accedes, proceed to garrison the Red River as high up as Shreveport, the seaboard at Galveston, Malag of the Red River received word from General Canby that Kirby Smith had surrendered under terms similar to those accorded Lee and Johnston. But the surrender was not carried out in good faith, particularly by the Texas troops, though this I did nong made to arrest him personally. Had this been specially desired it might have been accomplished very readily just after Lee's surrender, for it was an open secret that Early was then not far away, pretty badly disabled with rheumatism. By the
Maximilian (search for this): chapter 34
leaving Washington flight of General Early Maximilian making demonstrations on the upper Rio Grande Confederates join Maximilian the French invasion of Mexico and its relations to the rebellion ct, he looked upon the invasion of Mexico by Maximilian as a part of the rebellion itself, because oible, the escaping Confederates from joining Maximilian. With this purpose in view, and not forgette speedy evacuation of the entire country by Maximilian, had not our Government weakened; contenting with Napoleon. As the summer wore away, Maximilian, under Mr. Seward's policy, gained in strengges being promoters of the enterprise, which Maximilian took to readily. He saw in it the possibiliumors pointing to the tottering condition of Maximilian's Empire-first, that Orizaba and Vera Cruz wssarily been but an outline — is soon told. Maximilian, though deserted, determined to hold out to eral leaders unfortunate enough to fall into Maximilian's hands during the prosperous days of his Em
eans I so telegraphed General Grant, and he, thinking General Caravajal (then in Washington seeking aid for the Republic) woe purpose, persuaded him to report to me in New Orleans. Caravajal promptly appeared, but he did not impress me very favorabcks of Cortinas and Canales, had abandoned the place, and Caravajal, because of his credentials from our side, was in commandsville I visited Matamoras, and had a long interview with Caravajal. The outcome of this meeting was, on my part, a strongerer Canales or Cortinas would get possession of the city. Caravajal made too many professions of what he would do — in short,d feathers of Canales and Cortinas. In my interview with Caravajal I recommended Major Young as a confidential man, whom he organized there a band of men to act as a body-guard for Caravajal, the old wretch having induced him to accept the propositme the party got across the Gulf and over to Brownsville, Caravajal had been deposed by Canales, and the latter would not acc
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