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Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
west of the Mississippi, you will proceed without delay to the West to arrange all preliminaries for your new field of duties. Your duty is to restore Texas, and that part of Louisiana held by the enemy, to the Union in the shortest practicable time, in a way most effectual for securing permanent peace. To do this, you will be given all the troops that can be spared by MajorGeneral Canby, probably twenty-five thousand men of all arms; the troops with Major-General J. J. Reynolds, in Arkansas, say twelve thousand, Reynolds to command; the Fourth Army Corps, now at Nashville, Tennessee, awaiting orders; and the Twenty-Fifth Army Corps, now at City Point, Virginia, ready to embark. I do not wish to trammel you with instructions; I will state, however, that if Smith holds out, without even on ostensible government to receive orders from or to report to, he and his men are not entitled to the considerations due to an acknowledged belligerent. Theirs are the conditions of outlaw
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
at morning at Willard's Hotel, but as I could conceive of nothing to take the President there I set the story down as a canard, and went to bed without giving it further thought. Next morning, however, an official telegram confirmed the fact of the assassination, though eliminating the distorted circumstances that had been communicated the night before. When we reached Petersburg my column was halted, and instructions given me to march the cavalry and the Sixth Corps to Greensboroa, North Carolina, for the purpose of aiding General Sherman (the surrender of General Johnston having not yet been effected), so I made the necessary preparations and moved on the 24th of April, arriving at South Boston, on the Dan River, the 28th, the Sixth Corps having reached Danville meanwhile. At South Boston I received a despatch from General Halleck, who immediately after Lee's surrender had been assigned to command at Richmond, informing me that General Johnston had been brought to terms. The n
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
minating the distorted circumstances that had been communicated the night before. When we reached Petersburg my column was halted, and instructions given me to march the cavalry and the Sixth Corps to Greensboroa, North Carolina, for the purpose of aiding General Sherman (the surrender of General Johnston having not yet been effected), so I made the necessary preparations and moved on the 24th of April, arriving at South Boston, on the Dan River, the 28th, the Sixth Corps having reached Danville meanwhile. At South Boston I received a despatch from General Halleck, who immediately after Lee's surrender had been assigned to command at Richmond, informing me that General Johnston had been brought to terms. The necessity for going farther south being thus obviated we retraced our Eighth expedition to the Dan River and return. steps to Petersburg, from which place I proceeded by steamer to Washington, leading the cavalry to be marched thither by easy stages. The day after my
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): chapter 34
were in a bad fix. The only thing left to do was to tender their services to General Escobedo, and with this in view the party set out to reach the General's camp, marching up the Rio Grande on the American side, intending to cross near Ringgold Barracks. In advance of them, however, had spread far and wide the tidings of who they were, what they proposed to do, and where they were going, and before they could cross into Mexico they were attacked by a party of ex-Confederates and renegade Mexican rancheros. Being on American soil, Young forbade his men to return the fire, and bent all his efforts to getting them over the river; but in this attempt they were broken up, and became completely demoralized. A number of the men were drowned while swimming the river, Young himself was shot and killed, a few were captured, and those who escaped — about twenty in all-finally joined Escobedo, but in such a plight as to be of little use. With this distressing affair came to an end pretty muc
South Boston, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
ry and the Sixth Corps to Greensboroa, North Carolina, for the purpose of aiding General Sherman (the surrender of General Johnston having not yet been effected), so I made the necessary preparations and moved on the 24th of April, arriving at South Boston, on the Dan River, the 28th, the Sixth Corps having reached Danville meanwhile. At South Boston I received a despatch from General Halleck, who immediately after Lee's surrender had been assigned to command at Richmond, informing me that GeneSouth Boston I received a despatch from General Halleck, who immediately after Lee's surrender had been assigned to command at Richmond, informing me that General Johnston had been brought to terms. The necessity for going farther south being thus obviated we retraced our Eighth expedition to the Dan River and return. steps to Petersburg, from which place I proceeded by steamer to Washington, leading the cavalry to be marched thither by easy stages. The day after my arrival in Washington an important order was sent me, accompanied by the following letter of instructions, transferring me to a new field of operations: headquarters armies
Monterrey (Nuevo Leon, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 34
ted was found in my inquiries regarding the quantity of forage we could depend upon getting in Mexico, our arrangements for its purchase, and my sending a pontoon train to Brownsville, together with which was cited the renewed activity of the troops along the lower Rio Grande. These reports and demonstrations resulted in alarming the Imperialists so much that they withdrew the French and Austrian soldiers from Matamoras, and practically abandoned the whole of northern Mexico as far down as Monterey, with the exception of Matamoras, where General MeJia continued to hang on with a garrison of renegade Mexicans. The abandonment of so much territory in northern Mexico encouraged General Escobedo and other Liberal leaders to such a degree that they collected a considerable army of their followers at Comargo, Mier, and other points. At the same time that unknown quantity, Cortinas, suspended his freebooting for the nonce, and stoutly harassing Matamoras, succeeded in keeping its Imperi
San Antonio (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
decided to traverse the State with two columns of cavalry, directing one to San Antonio under Merritt, the other to Houston under Custer. Both commands were to d with rheumatism. By the time the two columns were ready to set out for San Antonio and Houston, General Frank Herron, with and division of the Thirteenth Corpsordered to report to me accordingly, I sent the Fourth Corps to Victoria and San Antonio, and the bulk of the Twenty-fifth to Brownsville. Then came the feeding and caring for all these troops — a difficult matter-for those at Victoria and San Antonio had to be provisioned overland from Indianola across the hog-wallow prairie, scene of my attempt. Merritt's cavalry and the Fourth Corps still being at San Antonio, I went to that place and reviewed these troops, and having prepared them wI was only awaiting the arrival of the troops, then under marching orders at San Antonio, to cross the Rio Grande in behalf of the Liberal cause. Ample corrobora
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
Chapter IX Ordered to Greensboroa, N. C. March to the Dan River assigned to the command West of the Mississippi leaving Washington flight of General Early Maximilian making demonstrations on the upper Rio Grande Confederates join Maximilian the French invasion of Mexico and its relations to the rebellion assisting the Liberals restoration of the Republic. The surrender at Appomattox put a stop to all military operations on the part of General Grant's forces, and the morning of April 10 my cavalry began its march to Petersburg, the men anticipating that they would soon be mustered out and returned to their homes. At Nottoway Court House I heard of the assassination of the President. The first news came to us the night after the dastardly deed, the telegraph operator having taken it from the wires while in transmission to General Meade. The despatch ran that Mr. Lincoln had been shot at 10 o'clock that morning at Willard's Hotel, but as I could conceive of not
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
mand of the Middle Military Division and assigning you to command west of the Mississippi, you will proceed without delay to the West to arrange all preliminaries for your new field of duties. Your duty is to restore Texas, and that part of Louisiana held by the enemy, to the Union in the shortest practicable time, in a way most effectual for securing permanent peace. To do this, you will be given all the troops that can be spared by MajorGeneral Canby, probably twenty-five thousand menment, looking to the suppression of the colony; but, as usual, nothing could be effected through that channel; so, as an alternative, I published, in April, 1866, by authority of General Grant, an order prohibiting the embarkation from ports in Louisiana and Texas, for ports in Mexico, of any person without a permit from my headquarters. This dampened the ardor of everybody in the Gulf States who had planned to go to Mexico; and although the projectors of the Cordova Colonization Scheme — the
Fort Taylor (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 34
Steele had gone to Brazos Santiago, to hold Brownsville and the line of the Rio Grande, the object ntonio, and the bulk of the Twenty-fifth to Brownsville. Then came the feeding and caring for all airie, while the supplies for the forces at Brownsville and along the Rio Grande must come by way o whom I had had sent from Washington. From Brownsville I despatched all these men to important poipurchase, and my sending a pontoon train to Brownsville, together with which was cited the renewed myself by the next boat. When I arrived in Brownsville, matters in Matamoras had already reached ahould reconcile. The day after I got to Brownsville I visited Matamoras, and had a long intervirtnight passed before I heard anything from Brownsville. In the meanwhile Major Young had come to e the party got across the Gulf and over to Brownsville, Caravajal had been deposed by Canales, andican soil. Colonel Sedgwick, commanding at Brownsville, was now temporary master of Matamoras also[3 more...]
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