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Gravelotte (France) (search for this): chapter 41
ng about 30,000 men, had been ordered to march to Gravelotte, and after proceeding a short distance we overtooground overlooking the villages of Rezonville and Gravelotte, about the centre of the battle-field of Marsla-There we could see, as I have said, the village of Gravelotte. Before it lay the German troops, concealed to slittle except to get possession of the village of Gravelotte, forcing the French across the deep ravine I haveuded to move his headquarters into the village of Gravelotte; and just after getting there, we first learned f the fugitives fled back across the ravine toward Gravelotte. With this the battle on the right had now assum were that the French would attack the heights of Gravelotte; but the Pomeranian corps coming on the field at not go immediately with the King, but remained at Gravelotte, looking after some of the escort who had been woizations, that had been rallied on the heights of Gravelotte. The lost ground being thus regained, and the Fr
Metz (France) (search for this): chapter 41
t-a-Mousson to R6zonville, which is on the direct road from Metz to Chalons, and near the central point of the field where, la-Tour, and from it most of the country to the east toward Metz could also be seen. The point chosen was an excellent one s then taking place, and so on. Before us, and covering Metz, lay the French army, posted on the crest of a ridge extendar Saar, and, eight days later, of Colombey, to the east of Metz; while the centre and left were composed of the several corne was cut off from the Verdun road, and forced back toward Metz. At first the German plan was simply to threaten with tnd hedges, through valleys and hamlets, in the direction of Metz, but as yet the German right had accomplished little exceptded to make an obstinate fight to cover their withdrawal to Metz. As the Germans moved to the attack here, the French fire ng before word came that Bazaine's army was falling back to Metz, leaving the entire battle-field in possession of the Germa
Verdun (France) (search for this): chapter 41
lready successfully met the French in three pitched battles. On the right was the; First Army, under command of General Von Steinmetz, the victors, August 6, of Spicheren, near Saar, and, eight days later, of Colombey, to the east of Metz; while the centre and left were composed of the several corps of the Second Army, commanded by Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia, a part of whose troops had just been engaged in the sanguinary battle of Mars-la-Tour, by which Bazaine was cut off from the Verdun road, and forced back toward Metz. At first the German plan was simply to threaten with their right, while the corps of the Second Army advanced toward the north, to prevent the French, of whose intentions there was much doubt, from escaping toward Chalons; then, as the purposes of the French might be developed, these corps were to change direction toward the enemy successively, and seek to turn his right flank. But the location of this vital turning-point was very uncertain, and until
Remilly (France) (search for this): chapter 41
ar, our Minister got us excused from our visit of ceremony, and we started for the headquarters of the German army that evening-our stay in the Prussian capital having been somewhat less than a day. Our train was a very long one, of over eighty cars, and though drawn by three locomotives, its progress to Cologne was very slow and the journey most tedious. From Cologne we continued on by rail up the valley of the Rhine to Bingebruck, near Bingen, and thence across through Saarbrfiken to Remilly, where we left the railway and rode in a hay-wagon to Pont-a-Mousson, arriving there August 17, late in the afternoon. This little city had been ceded to France at the Peace of Westphalia, and although originally German, the people had become, in the lapse of so many years, intensely French in sentiment. The town was so full of officers and men belonging to the German army that it was difficult to get lodgings, but after some delay we found quite comfortable quarters at one of the small h
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
toward R6zonville. I waited for Count Bismarck, who did not go immediately with the King, but remained at Gravelotte, looking after some of the escort who had been wounded. When he had arranged for their care, we set out to rejoin the King, and before going far, overtook his Majesty, who had stopped on the Chalons road, and was surrounded by a throng of fugitives, whom he was berating in German so energetic as to remind me forcibly of the Dutch swearing that I used to hear in my boyhood in Ohio. The dressing down finished to his satisfaction, the King resumed his course toward R6zonville, halting, however, to rebuke in the same emphatic style every group of runaways he overtook. Passing through R6zonville, we halted just beyond the village; there a fire was built, and the King, his brother, Prince Frederick Charles, and Von Roon were provided with rather uncomfortable seats about it, made by resting the ends of a short ladder on a couple of boxes. With much anxiety and not a l
Chalons (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
each span, completed the establishment. All being ready, we took one of the roads from Pont-a-Mousson to R6zonville, which is on the direct road from Metz to Chalons, and near the central point of the field where, on the 16th of August, the battle of Mars-la-Tour had been fought. It was by this road that the Pomeranians, numbh their right, while the corps of the Second Army advanced toward the north, to prevent the French, of whose intentions there was much doubt, from escaping toward Chalons; then, as the purposes of the French might be developed, these corps were to change direction toward the enemy successively, and seek to turn his right flank. Bucort who had been wounded. When he had arranged for their care, we set out to rejoin the King, and before going far, overtook his Majesty, who had stopped on the Chalons road, and was surrounded by a throng of fugitives, whom he was berating in German so energetic as to remind me forcibly of the Dutch swearing that I used to hear
America, about which he seemed much concerned, inquiring repeatedly as to which side-France or Prussia--was charged with bringing on the war. Expressing a desire to witness the battle which was expeoduced, who informed me that he was there to conduct and present me to his Majesty, the King of Prussia. As we were walking along together, I inquired whether at the meeting I should remove my cap, interest as to the sentiment in my own country about the war. At this time William the First of Prussia was seventy-three years of age, and, dressed in the uniform of the Guards, he seemed to be the were composed of the several corps of the Second Army, commanded by Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia, a part of whose troops had just been engaged in the sanguinary battle of Mars-la-Tour, by whiche old man's face was aglow with enthusiasm, and not without good cause, for in the war between Prussia and Austria in 1866, as well as in the present campaign, the Red Prince had displayed the highe
Holland (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 41
g the ground with reluctance, however-and went back toward R6zonville. I waited for Count Bismarck, who did not go immediately with the King, but remained at Gravelotte, looking after some of the escort who had been wounded. When he had arranged for their care, we set out to rejoin the King, and before going far, overtook his Majesty, who had stopped on the Chalons road, and was surrounded by a throng of fugitives, whom he was berating in German so energetic as to remind me forcibly of the Dutch swearing that I used to hear in my boyhood in Ohio. The dressing down finished to his satisfaction, the King resumed his course toward R6zonville, halting, however, to rebuke in the same emphatic style every group of runaways he overtook. Passing through R6zonville, we halted just beyond the village; there a fire was built, and the King, his brother, Prince Frederick Charles, and Von Roon were provided with rather uncomfortable seats about it, made by resting the ends of a short ladder
Westphalia (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 41
than a day. Our train was a very long one, of over eighty cars, and though drawn by three locomotives, its progress to Cologne was very slow and the journey most tedious. From Cologne we continued on by rail up the valley of the Rhine to Bingebruck, near Bingen, and thence across through Saarbrfiken to Remilly, where we left the railway and rode in a hay-wagon to Pont-a-Mousson, arriving there August 17, late in the afternoon. This little city had been ceded to France at the Peace of Westphalia, and although originally German, the people had become, in the lapse of so many years, intensely French in sentiment. The town was so full of officers and men belonging to the German army that it was difficult to get lodgings, but after some delay we found quite comfortable quarters at one of the small hotels, and presently, after we had succeeded in getting a slender meal, I sent my card to Count von Bismarck, the Chancellor of the North German Confederation, who soon responded by appoin
Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 41
d my thirst the King's brother called me aside, and drawing from his coat-tail pocket a piece of stale black bread, divided it with me, and while munching on this the Prince began talking of his son-General Prince Frederick Charles, popularly called the Red Prince — who was in command of the Second Army in this battle-the German left wing. In recounting his son's professional career the old man's face was aglow with enthusiasm, and not without good cause, for in the war between Prussia and Austria in 1866, as well as in the present campaign, the Red Prince had displayed the highest order of military genius. The headquarters now became the scene of much bustle, despatches announcing the victory being sent in all directions. The first one transmitted was to the Queen, the King directing Count Bismarck to prepare it for his signature; then followed others of a more official character, and while these matters were being attended to I thought I would ride into the village to find, if
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