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Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ion of a soldier to undertake the duties of any position to which he may be assigned by competent authority, I doubt whether there was an officer in all the armies of the Confederacy who would have consented to accept appointment as Lee's successor in command of the Army of Northern Virginia--possibly there was one--and I am yet more disposed to question whether that army would have permitted Lee to resign his place or any other to take it. Looking back over its record, from Seven Pines to Appomattox, I am satisfied that the unquestioned and unquestionable preeminence, predominance, and permanence of Lee, as its commander-in-chief, was one of the main elements which made the Army of Northern Virginia what it was. I have said we never criticised him. I ought, perhaps, to make one qualification of this statement. It has been suggested by others and I have myself once or twice felt that Lee was too lenient, too full of sweet charity and allowance. He did not, as Jackson did, instant
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ur full years. In fact, he was not himself in the military service of Virginia and of the Confederate States together for that length of time, and he did not assume personal command of what was then s created one of the five full generals provided for by law in the military service of the Confederate States. As full general in the Confederate service, Lee was not at first assigned to particulthe conduct, under the advice of the President, of the operations of all the armies of the Confederate States, he of course had more or less supervision and control of the armies in Virginia. Such co Army of Northern Virginia, so far as I know or have reason to believe, but one man in the Confederate States ever dared to suggest a change, and that one was Lee himself, who — after the battle of Gnd experienced as a private soldier and subordinate officer in the military service of the Confederate States in Virginia from 1861 to 1865. It is not proposed, however, to give a consecutive reci
Seven Pines (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
less supervision and control of the armies in Virginia. Such continued to be Lee's position and duties, and his relations to the troops in Virginia, until General Joseph E. Johnston, commanding the army defending Richmond, was struck down at Seven Pines, or Fair Oaks, June 1st, 1862, when President Davis appointed Lee to succeed him in command of that army. From this brief review it appears clearly that the men who, after June 1st, 1862, followed Lee's banner and were under his immediate 's successor in command of the Army of Northern Virginia--possibly there was one--and I am yet more disposed to question whether that army would have permitted Lee to resign his place or any other to take it. Looking back over its record, from Seven Pines to Appomattox, I am satisfied that the unquestioned and unquestionable preeminence, predominance, and permanence of Lee, as its commander-in-chief, was one of the main elements which made the Army of Northern Virginia what it was. I have s
sense his soldiers and under his control; so that, while strictly speaking no soldier followed Lee for four years, yet we who served in Virginia from the beginning to the end of the war are entitled, in the customary and popular sense, to speak of our term of service as Four years under Lee. But our claim is, Four years under Marse Robert. Why Marse Robert? So, in Innes Randolph's inimitable song, A good old Rebel, the hero thus vaunts his brief but glorious annals: I followed old Mars' Robert For four year, near about; Got wounded in three places And starved at Pint Lookout. Again, why Marse Robert? The passion of soldiers for nicknaming their favorite leaders, re-christening them according to their unfettered fancy and their own sweet will, is well known. The little corporal, The iron Duke, Marshall forwards, Bobs, Bobs Bahadur, Little Mac, Little Phil, Fighting Joe, Stonewall, Old Jack, Old Pete, Old Jube, Jubilee, Rooney, Fitz, Marse Robert --all these and many
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 1
Marster, whether he referred to the one up at headquarters or the One up yonder. We never compared him with other men, either friend or foe. He was in a superlative and absolute class by himself. Beyond a vague suggestion, after the death of Jackson, as to what might have been if he had lived, I cannot recall even an approach to a comparative estimate of Lee. As to his opponents, we recked not at all of them, but only of the immense material force behind them; and as to that, we trustedsaid we never criticised him. I ought, perhaps, to make one qualification of this statement. It has been suggested by others and I have myself once or twice felt that Lee was too lenient, too full of sweet charity and allowance. He did not, as Jackson did, instantly and relentlessly remove incompetent officers. The picture is before you, and yet it is not intended as a full picture, but only as such a presentation of him, from the point of view of his soldiers, as will explain and justify
glorious annals: I followed old Mars' Robert For four year, near about; Got wounded in three places And starved at Pint Lookout. Again, why Marse Robert? The passion of soldiers for nicknaming their favorite leaders, re-christening them according to their unfettered fancy and their own sweet will, is well known. The little corporal, The iron Duke, Marshall forwards, Bobs, Bobs Bahadur, Little Mac, Little Phil, Fighting Joe, Stonewall, Old Jack, Old Pete, Old Jube, Jubilee, Rooney, Fitz, Marse Robert --all these and many more are familiar. There is something grotesque about most of them and in many, seemingly, rank disrespect. Yet the habit has never been regarded as a violation of military law, and the commanding general of an army, if a staunch fighter, and particularly if victory often perches on his banner, is very apt to win the noways doubtful compliment of this rough and ready knighthood from his devoted troops. But however this may be, Marse Robert is far away ab
Stonewall (search for this): chapter 1
, A good old Rebel, the hero thus vaunts his brief but glorious annals: I followed old Mars' Robert For four year, near about; Got wounded in three places And starved at Pint Lookout. Again, why Marse Robert? The passion of soldiers for nicknaming their favorite leaders, re-christening them according to their unfettered fancy and their own sweet will, is well known. The little corporal, The iron Duke, Marshall forwards, Bobs, Bobs Bahadur, Little Mac, Little Phil, Fighting Joe, Stonewall, Old Jack, Old Pete, Old Jube, Jubilee, Rooney, Fitz, Marse Robert --all these and many more are familiar. There is something grotesque about most of them and in many, seemingly, rank disrespect. Yet the habit has never been regarded as a violation of military law, and the commanding general of an army, if a staunch fighter, and particularly if victory often perches on his banner, is very apt to win the noways doubtful compliment of this rough and ready knighthood from his devoted troop
ef but glorious annals: I followed old Mars' Robert For four year, near about; Got wounded in three places And starved at Pint Lookout. Again, why Marse Robert? The passion of soldiers for nicknaming their favorite leaders, re-christening them according to their unfettered fancy and their own sweet will, is well known. The little corporal, The iron Duke, Marshall forwards, Bobs, Bobs Bahadur, Little Mac, Little Phil, Fighting Joe, Stonewall, Old Jack, Old Pete, Old Jube, Jubilee, Rooney, Fitz, Marse Robert --all these and many more are familiar. There is something grotesque about most of them and in many, seemingly, rank disrespect. Yet the habit has never been regarded as a violation of military law, and the commanding general of an army, if a staunch fighter, and particularly if victory often perches on his banner, is very apt to win the noways doubtful compliment of this rough and ready knighthood from his devoted troops. But however this may be, Marse Robert is far
Charles Marshall (search for this): chapter 1
der Marse Robert. Why Marse Robert? So, in Innes Randolph's inimitable song, A good old Rebel, the hero thus vaunts his brief but glorious annals: I followed old Mars' Robert For four year, near about; Got wounded in three places And starved at Pint Lookout. Again, why Marse Robert? The passion of soldiers for nicknaming their favorite leaders, re-christening them according to their unfettered fancy and their own sweet will, is well known. The little corporal, The iron Duke, Marshall forwards, Bobs, Bobs Bahadur, Little Mac, Little Phil, Fighting Joe, Stonewall, Old Jack, Old Pete, Old Jube, Jubilee, Rooney, Fitz, Marse Robert --all these and many more are familiar. There is something grotesque about most of them and in many, seemingly, rank disrespect. Yet the habit has never been regarded as a violation of military law, and the commanding general of an army, if a staunch fighter, and particularly if victory often perches on his banner, is very apt to win the noways
Innes Randolph (search for this): chapter 1
banner and were under his immediate command were, even before that time and from the very outset, in a large and true sense his soldiers and under his control; so that, while strictly speaking no soldier followed Lee for four years, yet we who served in Virginia from the beginning to the end of the war are entitled, in the customary and popular sense, to speak of our term of service as Four years under Lee. But our claim is, Four years under Marse Robert. Why Marse Robert? So, in Innes Randolph's inimitable song, A good old Rebel, the hero thus vaunts his brief but glorious annals: I followed old Mars' Robert For four year, near about; Got wounded in three places And starved at Pint Lookout. Again, why Marse Robert? The passion of soldiers for nicknaming their favorite leaders, re-christening them according to their unfettered fancy and their own sweet will, is well known. The little corporal, The iron Duke, Marshall forwards, Bobs, Bobs Bahadur, Little Mac, Little
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