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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

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.; but at last the lead poison was ascertained to be a fact, and the excitement quieted down, but the accident plunged many families into mourning. Mississippi lost a gallant soldier, a faithful advocate, and useful citizen from this cause, General John Anthony Quitman, and she mourned him with a deep sense of his rare moral qualities and great civil and military services. The day of the inauguration I went to Willard's Hotel parlor to see the procession, and Mr. Buchanan, Mr. Cass, and Governor Marcy came to speak to me. I was much impressed with Mr. Buchanan's kind, deferential manner, and the friendly way in which he inquired for Mr. and Mrs. Pierce. He was gracious because he felt kindly. After the ceremony, Mr. and Mrs. Pierce returned at once to Concord and resumed the course of their former quiet and uneventful lives. In the summer, Mr. and Mrs. Pierce and Nathaniel Hawthorne made the tour through Europe of which Hawthorne, in his published diaries, wrote so charmingly.
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 38
sonville, Fla.: During Mr. Pierce's administration an effort was made by Mr. Benton to have the work of the coast survey divided into several independent bureaus, his special purpose being to place his son-in-law, then Captain J. C. Fremont, as Superintendent of the Bureau proposed to be established on the Pacific coast. To attain his object, he made a deliberate and violent attack on the coast survey, fortified himself in the reports of surveys carried on under the Ordnance Bureau in England, and encyclopaedia skimming of similar works on the continent. The ablest and best-posted defender of the superintendent was Mr. Jefferson Davis, then Senator from Mississippi. He graduated in the same class with Professor Bache, and was his life-long friend. With far more accurate knowledge of the subject than Mr. Benton, and advised by Professor Bache, he made a searching and exhaustive review of the coast survey, and a close comparison of its results, both in time of execution a
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 38
eral different parties were, therefore, organized to examine the various routes, supposed to be practicable, within the northwestern and southern limits of the United States. The arguments which I had used as a Senator were the military necessity for such means of transportation and the need of safe and rapid communication with tg rotation the rule, and leaving them independent of the favor of officials at headquarters. He sold the military reservations not needful for the uses of the United States, and thus rendered great service to the States within which they were located, and thereby also added much money to the treasury. Foreseeing frequent interon on the high arena of the Senate Chamber, of the value and importance of the survey, and American pride was gratified at the high standard maintained by the United States, both in the scientific and practical development of a great enterprise. The impression made upon the Senate was shown in the vote. Mr. Benton's bill receive
Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
; but at last the lead poison was ascertained to be a fact, and the excitement quieted down, but the accident plunged many families into mourning. Mississippi lost a gallant soldier, a faithful advocate, and useful citizen from this cause, General John Anthony Quitman, and she mourned him with a deep sense of his rare moral qualities and great civil and military services. The day of the inauguration I went to Willard's Hotel parlor to see the procession, and Mr. Buchanan, Mr. Cass, and Governor Marcy came to speak to me. I was much impressed with Mr. Buchanan's kind, deferential manner, and the friendly way in which he inquired for Mr. and Mrs. Pierce. He was gracious because he felt kindly. After the ceremony, Mr. and Mrs. Pierce returned at once to Concord and resumed the course of their former quiet and uneventful lives. In the summer, Mr. and Mrs. Pierce and Nathaniel Hawthorne made the tour through Europe of which Hawthorne, in his published diaries, wrote so charmingly.
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 38
abinet, some idea may be formed of the power over men possessed and exercised by Mr. Pierce. Chivalrous, generous, amiable, true to his faith, frank and bold in the declaration of his opinions, he never deceived anyone. And, if treachery had ever come near him, it would have stood abashed in the presence of his truth, his manliness, and his confiding simplicity. He revised the system of tactics, and sent an accomplished soldier, afterward General Hardee, of the Confederate service, to Paris, to study the best mode of doing so. He lent his powerful aid to the perfecting of a signal corps; fixed four years as the time for the frontier service of officers; thus making rotation the rule, and leaving them independent of the favor of officials at headquarters. He sold the military reservations not needful for the uses of the United States, and thus rendered great service to the States within which they were located, and thereby also added much money to the treasury. Foreseeing f
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
f in the reports of surveys carried on under the Ordnance Bureau in England, and encyclopaedia skimming of similar works on the continent. The ablest and best-posted defender of the superintendent was Mr. Jefferson Davis, then Senator from Mississippi. He graduated in the same class with Professor Bache, and was his life-long friend. With far more accurate knowledge of the subject than Mr. Benton, and advised by Professor Bache, he made a searching and exhaustive review of the coast susident and his Cabinet, that he was only saved by the chance of his going to another hotel, etc.; but at last the lead poison was ascertained to be a fact, and the excitement quieted down, but the accident plunged many families into mourning. Mississippi lost a gallant soldier, a faithful advocate, and useful citizen from this cause, General John Anthony Quitman, and she mourned him with a deep sense of his rare moral qualities and great civil and military services. The day of the inaugura
Jacksonville (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
evenings at home, he personally translated a book on the service of camels, from the French, and succeeded in getting them brought out for the uses of army transportation across the arid prairies, and if the experiment had been properly and persistently pushed to its legitimate results, we should now have the prairies covered with these ships of the desert, and the facilities for the transportation of armies much increased. The following notice is extracted from the Florida Herald, Jacksonville, Fla.: During Mr. Pierce's administration an effort was made by Mr. Benton to have the work of the coast survey divided into several independent bureaus, his special purpose being to place his son-in-law, then Captain J. C. Fremont, as Superintendent of the Bureau proposed to be established on the Pacific coast. To attain his object, he made a deliberate and violent attack on the coast survey, fortified himself in the reports of surveys carried on under the Ordnance Bureau in England,
Portland Harbor (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
onsequence was, as the inventor did not feel willing to do it himself, it was never tried, and was at the navy yard the last Mr. Davis heard of it. In addition to these labors, many of which were finished successfully in his period of service, he gave such valuable suggestions to workmen at Colt's Armory that they made him a pistol, on the silver breech of which they engraved the words, To a brother inventor. He had numberless forts repaired and rehabilitated, notably the one in Portland harbor, for which, at one time, it seemed impossible to construct a solid foundation. He enabled his Government to settle the boundary of San Juan De Ulloa by his judicious choice of the admirable officer whom he sent to make the survey. In the evenings at home, he personally translated a book on the service of camels, from the French, and succeeded in getting them brought out for the uses of army transportation across the arid prairies, and if the experiment had been properly and persistent
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
the survey. In the evenings at home, he personally translated a book on the service of camels, from the French, and succeeded in getting them brought out for the uses of army transportation across the arid prairies, and if the experiment had been properly and persistently pushed to its legitimate results, we should now have the prairies covered with these ships of the desert, and the facilities for the transportation of armies much increased. The following notice is extracted from the Florida Herald, Jacksonville, Fla.: During Mr. Pierce's administration an effort was made by Mr. Benton to have the work of the coast survey divided into several independent bureaus, his special purpose being to place his son-in-law, then Captain J. C. Fremont, as Superintendent of the Bureau proposed to be established on the Pacific coast. To attain his object, he made a deliberate and violent attack on the coast survey, fortified himself in the reports of surveys carried on under the Ordnan
John C. Fremont (search for this): chapter 38
roperly and persistently pushed to its legitimate results, we should now have the prairies covered with these ships of the desert, and the facilities for the transportation of armies much increased. The following notice is extracted from the Florida Herald, Jacksonville, Fla.: During Mr. Pierce's administration an effort was made by Mr. Benton to have the work of the coast survey divided into several independent bureaus, his special purpose being to place his son-in-law, then Captain J. C. Fremont, as Superintendent of the Bureau proposed to be established on the Pacific coast. To attain his object, he made a deliberate and violent attack on the coast survey, fortified himself in the reports of surveys carried on under the Ordnance Bureau in England, and encyclopaedia skimming of similar works on the continent. The ablest and best-posted defender of the superintendent was Mr. Jefferson Davis, then Senator from Mississippi. He graduated in the same class with Professor B
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