hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 1,039 11 Browse Search
United States (United States) 542 0 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 325 1 Browse Search
Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 190 22 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 186 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 172 0 Browse Search
James Grant 161 1 Browse Search
W. Porcher Miles 137 1 Browse Search
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) 128 0 Browse Search
Stateprisoner Davis 126 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

Found 296 total hits in 43 results.

1 2 3 4 5
France (France) (search for this): chapter 30
sieur Drouyn de L'Huys, addressed a note to the ambassadors at London and St. Petersburg, proposing that these great powers should arrange an armistice for six months, in view of the blood shed and the equal success of the combatants. The English Government answered that their offer might be declined by the United States Government. The Russian Government answered that their interposition might cause the opposite to the desired effect. For want of co-operation, the effort was not made by France. In May, 1861, Her Britannic Majesty assured our enemies that the sympathies of this country were rather with the North than with the South, and on June I, 1861, she interdicted the use of her ports to armed ships and privateers, though the United States claimed this right for themselves. On June 12, 1861, the United States reproved Great Britain for holding intercourse with the Commissioners of the Confederate States, so-called, and received assurances that it would not occur again. O
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 30
blockade. Soon after the right of neutral ships to trade with English ships was abandoned by England. The duty to recognize a belligerent was postponed, and all the recognized neutral rights by w from the enterprise of the Confederate cruisers was claimed from, and partially accorded by Great Britain, because our vessels were built in her ports. Thus, though the armies of the United States ited States claimed this right for themselves. On June 12, 1861, the United States reproved Great Britain for holding intercourse with the Commissioners of the Confederate States, so-called, and rec United States for war, and knew that the affair of the Trent had left on their minds toward Great Britain a bitter sense of injury. The only measure by which Mr. Seward governed his presentation ofpplemental to that letter. If it be true, as there assumed, that in the settled judgment of England the separation of the States is final, then the failure of so great a power to recognize the fa
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
population has been restored to the Union, and now evinces its loyalty and firm adherence to the Government; that the white population now in insurrection is under five millions, and that the Southern Confederacy owes its main strength to the hope of assistance from Europe. In the face of the fluctuating events of the war; the alternations of victory and defeat ; the capture of New Orleans; the advance of the Federals to Corinth, to Memphis, and the banks of the Mississippi as far as Vicksburg; contrasted, on the other hand, with the failure of the attack on Charleston, and the retreat from before Richmondplaced, too, between allegations so contradictory on the part of the contending powers-Her Majesty's Government are still determined to wait. In order to be entitled to a place among the independent nations of the earth, a State ought to have not only strength and resources for a time, but afford promise of stability and permanence. Should the Confederate States of America
America (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 30
Office, July 24, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 17th instant, respecting the intention expressed by Her Majesty's Government to refrain from any present mediation between the contending parties in America, and I have to state to you, in reply, that in the opinion of Her Majesty's Government, any proposal to the United States to recognize the Confederacy would irritate the United States, and any proposal to the Southern States to return to the Uniof the States is final, then the failure of so great a power to recognize the fact in a formal manner imparts an opposite belief, and must operate as an incentive to the United States to protract the contest. In a war such as that pending in America, where a party in possession of the government is striving to subdue those who, for reasons sufficient to themselves, have withdrawn from it, the contest will be carried on in the heat of blood and of popular excitement long after its object has
eignty over the Confederate States, and the Governments of Europe announced that they could not assume to judge of the righttercourse accorded to the United States? Under this view European powers recognized for a year a. paper blockade, forgetful be effective. The language of the five great powers of Europe in the Congress at Paris, 1856. The Government of the ames T. Mason had been unavailingly trying to procure from Europe the acknowledgment of our rights as belligerents before the me to assume, as the judgment of the intelligence of all Europe, that the separation of the States of North America is finarties engaged in it, and to the prosperity and welfare of Europe. J. M. Mason. To Lord John Russell. Foreign Office, Auestroy it; that in the judgment of the intelligence of all Europe the separation is final ;, and that, under no possible cirracy owes its main strength to the hope of assistance from Europe. In the face of the fluctuating events of the war; the
Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
Chapter 30: foreign Relations.—Unjust discrimination against us.—Diplomatic correspondence. Mr. Mason was appointed our Representative in London, Mr. Slidell in Paris, Mr. Rost in Spain, and Mr. Mann in Belgium. I hope Mr. Mann's memoirs, which are very full and written from diaries, will be published, and these will shed much light upon the diplomatic service of the Confederacy. The Confederate States having dissolved their connection with the United States, whose relations were secl intercourse accorded to the United States? Under this view European powers recognized for a year a. paper blockade, forgetful that blockades to be binding must be effective. The language of the five great powers of Europe in the Congress at Paris, 1856. The Government of the Confederate States remonstrated against this injustice, and was answered by silence. However, Her Majesty's foreign office published a despatch dated February I , 1862, interpolating into the agreement of the
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 30
the once disaffected population has been restored to the Union, and now evinces its loyalty and firm adherence to the Government; that the white population now in insurrection is under five millions, and that the Southern Confederacy owes its main strength to the hope of assistance from Europe. In the face of the fluctuating events of the war; the alternations of victory and defeat ; the capture of New Orleans; the advance of the Federals to Corinth, to Memphis, and the banks of the Mississippi as far as Vicksburg; contrasted, on the other hand, with the failure of the attack on Charleston, and the retreat from before Richmondplaced, too, between allegations so contradictory on the part of the contending powers-Her Majesty's Government are still determined to wait. In order to be entitled to a place among the independent nations of the earth, a State ought to have not only strength and resources for a time, but afford promise of stability and permanence. Should the Confeder
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
firm adherence to the Government; that the white population now in insurrection is under five millions, and that the Southern Confederacy owes its main strength to the hope of assistance from Europe. In the face of the fluctuating events of the war; the alternations of victory and defeat ; the capture of New Orleans; the advance of the Federals to Corinth, to Memphis, and the banks of the Mississippi as far as Vicksburg; contrasted, on the other hand, with the failure of the attack on Charleston, and the retreat from before Richmondplaced, too, between allegations so contradictory on the part of the contending powers-Her Majesty's Government are still determined to wait. In order to be entitled to a place among the independent nations of the earth, a State ought to have not only strength and resources for a time, but afford promise of stability and permanence. Should the Confederate States of America win that place among nations, it might be right for other nations justly to
London, Madison County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
Chapter 30: foreign Relations.—Unjust discrimination against us.—Diplomatic correspondence. Mr. Mason was appointed our Representative in London, Mr. Slidell in Paris, Mr. Rost in Spain, and Mr. Mann in Belgium. I hope Mr. Mann's memoirs, which are very full and written from diaries, will be published, and these will shed much light upon the diplomatic service of the Confederacy. The Confederate States having dissolved their connection with the United States, whose relations were securely and long established with Foreign Governments, it devolved upon the Confederate States formally to declare to these Governments her separation from the United States. This the Provisional Congress did, but the United States antecedently had claimed sovereignty over the Confederate States, and the Governments of Europe announced that they could not assume to judge of the rights of the combatants. These Governments had fallen into the error, now commonly prevailing, that our separate sover
St. Petersburg (Russia) (search for this): chapter 30
world, protection was claimed for her commerce from the same source. Had the English Government not leaned to the side of the United States, the fact that the ballot-boxes used at elections were those of the States, and that the vote for their secession had been unanimous, would have been conclusive against characterizing the war as an insurrection. On October 3, 1862, the French minister of foreign affairs, Monsieur Drouyn de L'Huys, addressed a note to the ambassadors at London and St. Petersburg, proposing that these great powers should arrange an armistice for six months, in view of the blood shed and the equal success of the combatants. The English Government answered that their offer might be declined by the United States Government. The Russian Government answered that their interposition might cause the opposite to the desired effect. For want of co-operation, the effort was not made by France. In May, 1861, Her Britannic Majesty assured our enemies that the sympathies
1 2 3 4 5