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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

Found 26 total hits in 15 results.

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Yellow Tavern (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 51
Chapter 51: Yellow Tavern.—Death of Stuart. On the morning of May 13th, Mr. Davis came hurriedly in from the office for his pistols, and rode out to the front, where Generals Gracie and Ransom were disposing their skeleton brigades to repel General Sheridan's raiders, who had been hovering around for some days. At the Executive Mansion, the small-arms could be distinctly heard like the popping of fire-crackers. I summoned the children to prayer, and as my boy Jefferson knelt, he raised his little chubby face to me, and said, You had better have my pony saddled, and let me go out to help father; we can pray afterward. Wherever it was possible, the President went to the battle-field, and was present during the engagement, and at these times he bitterly regretted his executive office, and longed to engage actively in the fight. A line of skirmishers had been formed near the Yellow Tavern, our forces were closely pressed, and seeing a brigade preparing to charge on the left
Richmond McClellan (search for this): chapter 51
d willing, if it was His will, to leave the struggle and the end to His good pleasure. His wound was found to be necessarily mortal. His condition during Thursday, May 13, 1864, was very changeable, with occasional delirium and other unmistakable symptoms of dissolution. At these times his mind wandered, and like the immortal Jackson, in the lapse of reason his faculties were occupied with the details of his command. He reviewed, in broken sentences, all his glorious campaign around McClellan's rear on the Peninsula, beyond the Potomac, and upon the Rapidan, quoting from his own orders, with a last injunction to make haste. About noon, Thursday, President Davis visited his bedside and spent some fifteen minutes in the dying chamber of his young chieftain. The President, taking his hand, said, General, how do you feel? He replied, in his strong, cheery voice, Easy, but willing to die, if God and my country think I have fulfilled my destiny and done my duty. Mr. Davis came
rldly matters closed, he turned to the contemplation of eternity, and asked the Reverend Mr. Peterkin, of the Episcopal Church, of which he was an exemplary member, to sing the hymn commencing, Rock of ages, cleft for me, Let me hide myself in thee, and joined with all the voice his strength permitted. He then united in prayer with the minister. To the doctor he again said, I am going fast now; God's will be done. Thus died General J. E. B. Stuart, the great cavalry leader and exemplary Christian, at peace with God and man. His wife reached the house of death about ten o'clock on the Thursday night, about one hour and a half after his dissolution, and the poor young creature was utterly desolate. Her father was a Federal general in the regular army, and she was separated even from her family in her hour of trial. General Philip St. George Cooke, however, was an honorable foe, and his old friends sorrowed with her for his sake also. No military escort accompanied the proc
rs. R. E. Lee, he directed his golden spurs to be given as a dying memento of his love and esteem for her husband. To his staff officers he gave his horses. So considerate was he in small things, even to his dying hour, that he said to one of his staff, who was a very heavily built man, You had better take the larger horse; he will carry you better. To his young son he left his glorious sword. His worldly matters closed, he turned to the contemplation of eternity, and asked the Reverend Mr. Peterkin, of the Episcopal Church, of which he was an exemplary member, to sing the hymn commencing, Rock of ages, cleft for me, Let me hide myself in thee, and joined with all the voice his strength permitted. He then united in prayer with the minister. To the doctor he again said, I am going fast now; God's will be done. Thus died General J. E. B. Stuart, the great cavalry leader and exemplary Christian, at peace with God and man. His wife reached the house of death about ten o'clo
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 51
Chapter 51: Yellow Tavern.—Death of Stuart. On the morning of May 13th, Mr. Davis came hurriedly in from the office for his pistols, and rode out to the front, where Generals Gracie and Ransom were disposing their skeleton brigades to repel General Sheridan's raiders, who had been hovering around for some days. At the Execut rear on the Peninsula, beyond the Potomac, and upon the Rapidan, quoting from his own orders, with a last injunction to make haste. About noon, Thursday, President Davis visited his bedside and spent some fifteen minutes in the dying chamber of his young chieftain. The President, taking his hand, said, General, how do you feel? He replied, in his strong, cheery voice, Easy, but willing to die, if God and my country think I have fulfilled my destiny and done my duty. Mr. Davis came home and knelt with me in a prayer in which he entreated that this precious life might be spared to our needy country. As evening approached Stuart's delirium increased, a
Chapter 51: Yellow Tavern.—Death of Stuart. On the morning of May 13th, Mr. Davis came hurriedly in from the office for his pistols, and rode out to the front, where Generals Gracie and Ransom were disposing their skeleton brigades to repel General Sheridan's raiders, who had been hovering around for some days. At the Executive Mansion, the small-arms could be distinctly heard like the popping of fire-crackers. I summoned the children to prayer, and as my boy Jefferson knelt, he raised his little chubby face to me, and said, You had better have my pony saddled, and let me go out to help father; we can pray afterward. Wherever it was possible, the President went to the battle-field, and was present during the engagement, and at these times he bitterly regretted his executive office, and longed to engage actively in the fight. A line of skirmishers had been formed near the Yellow Tavern, our forces were closely pressed, and seeing a brigade preparing to charge on the left,
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 51
Chapter 51: Yellow Tavern.—Death of Stuart. On the morning of May 13th, Mr. Davis came hurriedly in from the office fo seeing a brigade preparing to charge on the left, General J. E. B. Stuart dashed over there to form his troops and repel the charge. The Federals came thundering down, recognized Stuart, and fired twelve shots at him; he wheeled upon them and empght be spared to our needy country. As evening approached Stuart's delirium increased, and he wandered to the battle-fieldsds of God, my country needs me here, I cannot come. General Stuart was but thirty-one years old, yet he had attained a no and no one dissented from the praise bestowed upon Beauty Stuart. He had lived void of offence toward his fellow-men, and am going fast now; God's will be done. Thus died General J. E. B. Stuart, the great cavalry leader and exemplary Christian,on their cause. They fought in better cheer for the memory of such sainted leaders as Stonewall Jackson and Beauty Stuart
Chapter 51: Yellow Tavern.—Death of Stuart. On the morning of May 13th, Mr. Davis came hurriedly in from the office for his pistols, and rode out to the front, where Generals Gracie and Ransom were disposing their skeleton brigades to repel General Sheridan's raiders, who had been hovering around for some days. At the Executive Mansion, the small-arms could be distinctly heard like the popping of fire-crackers. I summoned the children to prayer, and as my boy Jefferson knelt, he raised his little chubby face to me, and said, You had better have my pony saddled, and let me go out to help father; we can pray afterward. Wherever it was possible, the President went to the battle-field, and was present during the engagement, and at these times he bitterly regretted his executive office, and longed to engage actively in the fight. A line of skirmishers had been formed near the Yellow Tavern, our forces were closely pressed, and seeing a brigade preparing to charge on the left
Chapter 51: Yellow Tavern.—Death of Stuart. On the morning of May 13th, Mr. Davis came hurriedly in from the office for his pistols, and rode out to the front, where Generals Gracie and Ransom were disposing their skeleton brigades to repel General Sheridan's raiders, who had been hovering around for some days. At the Executive Mansion, the small-arms could be distinctly heard like the popping of fire-crackers. I summoned the children to prayer, and as my boy Jefferson knelt, he raised his little chubby face to me, and said, You had better have my pony saddled, and let me go out to help father; we can pray afterward. Wherever it was possible, the President went to the battle-field, and was present during the engagement, and at these times he bitterly regretted his executive office, and longed to engage actively in the fight. A line of skirmishers had been formed near the Yellow Tavern, our forces were closely pressed, and seeing a brigade preparing to charge on the left
Robert Ransom (search for this): chapter 51
Chapter 51: Yellow Tavern.—Death of Stuart. On the morning of May 13th, Mr. Davis came hurriedly in from the office for his pistols, and rode out to the front, where Generals Gracie and Ransom were disposing their skeleton brigades to repel General Sheridan's raiders, who had been hovering around for some days. At the Executive Mansion, the small-arms could be distinctly heard like the popping of fire-crackers. I summoned the children to prayer, and as my boy Jefferson knelt, he raised his little chubby face to me, and said, You had better have my pony saddled, and let me go out to help father; we can pray afterward. Wherever it was possible, the President went to the battle-field, and was present during the engagement, and at these times he bitterly regretted his executive office, and longed to engage actively in the fight. A line of skirmishers had been formed near the Yellow Tavern, our forces were closely pressed, and seeing a brigade preparing to charge on the left,
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