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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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Clarksville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
roled at Appomattox, arrived, from whom it was learned that when he left Lee's army, it was about to be surrendered. Other unofficial information soon followed, of such circumstantial character as to confirm these reports. How Mr. Davis bore defeat is best described by the following letter, written by Mr. Davis's faithful friend, M. H. Clarke, whose opportunities of knowing the President were better than those of another less intimately associated with him in a time of great trial. Clarksville, Tenn., October 6, 1890. My Dear Mrs. Davis: The history of his country is indissolubly woven with your honored husband, and therefore I offer my individual impressions of him in scenes which are yet unwritten. The sum of such impressions helps to give an idea of one phase of his manysided individuality, both simple and grand, which rounded out the perfect man. I came out of Richmond with him, the chief and confidential clerk of the Executive Office, in charge of the office papers, a
St. Paul (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
cuation of Richmond. I give Mr. Davis's story of the evacuation of Richmond in his own words. On Sunday, April 2d, while I was in St. Paul's Church, General Lee's telegram announcing his speedy withdrawal from Petersburg and the consequent necessity for evacuating Richmond, was handed me. I quietly left the church. The occurrence probably attracted attention, but the people had been beleaguered, had known me too often to receive notice of threatened attacks, and the congregation of St. Paul's was too refined, to make a scene at anticipated danger. I went to my office and assembled the heads of departments and bureaus, as far as they could be found on a day when all the offices were closed, and gave the needful instruction for our removal that night, simultaneously with General Lee's from Petersburg. The event was foreseen, and some preparations had been made for it, though, as it came sooner than was expected, there was yet much to be done. The executive papers were arrang
St. Paul's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 58
Chapter 58: the President's account of the evacuation of Richmond. I give Mr. Davis's story of the evacuation of Richmond in his own words. On Sunday, April 2d, while I was in St. Paul's Church, General Lee's telegram announcing his speedy withdrawal from Petersburg and the consequent necessity for evacuating Richmond, was handed me. I quietly left the church. The occurrence probably attracted attention, but the people had been beleaguered, had known me too often to receive notice of threatened attacks, and the congregation of St. Paul's was too refined, to make a scene at anticipated danger. I went to my office and assembled the heads of departments and bureaus, as far as they could be found on a day when all the offices were closed, and gave the needful instruction for our removal that night, simultaneously with General Lee's from Petersburg. The event was foreseen, and some preparations had been made for it, though, as it came sooner than was expected, there was yet
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
eper, I waited until notified of the time I would depart, and going to the station, started for Danville, whither I supposed General Lee would proceed with his army. Here he promptly proceeded to nergetic efforts were made to collect supplies for General Lee's army. Upon his arrival at Danville, President Davis wrote to Mrs. Davis as follows: Danville, Va., April 5, 1865. I have in Danville, Va., April 5, 1865. I have in vain sought to get into communication with General Lee, and have postponed writing in the hope that I would soon be able to speak to you with some confidence of the future. On last Sunday I was callements until those of the army are better developed. From President Davis to Mrs. Davis. Danville, Va., April 6, 1865. In my letter of yesterday I gave you all of my prospects which could noe houses for the departments could be found. While employed in preparing for the defence of Danville, no trustworthy information in regard to Lee's army was received, until Lieutenant John Sargent
Sandersville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
individual impressions of him in scenes which are yet unwritten. The sum of such impressions helps to give an idea of one phase of his manysided individuality, both simple and grand, which rounded out the perfect man. I came out of Richmond with him, the chief and confidential clerk of the Executive Office, in charge of the office papers, a member of his military family, composed of his cabinet and staff; and I was close to his person, until he parted with me on May 6, 1865, near Sandersville, Ga., and sent me on, in charge of our wagon train, he leaving everything on wheels to join you. Thus daily and nightly he was under my eyes, which watched over him with affectionate and earnest solicitude. On that retreat (if so leisurely a retirement could be so called), when I saw an organized government disintegrate and fall to pieces little by little, until there was only left a single member of the cabinet, his private secretary, a few members of his staff, a few guides and s
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
e where the current business may be transacted here, and do not propose at this time definitely to fix upon a point for a seat of government in the future. I am unwilling to leave Virginia, and do not know where, within her borders, the requisite houses for the departments could be found. While employed in preparing for the defence of Danville, no trustworthy information in regard to Lee's army was received, until Lieutenant John Sargent Wise of Virginia, who declined to be paroled at Appomattox, arrived, from whom it was learned that when he left Lee's army, it was about to be surrendered. Other unofficial information soon followed, of such circumstantial character as to confirm these reports. How Mr. Davis bore defeat is best described by the following letter, written by Mr. Davis's faithful friend, M. H. Clarke, whose opportunities of knowing the President were better than those of another less intimately associated with him in a time of great trial. Clarksville, Tenn., Oct
John Sargent Wise (search for this): chapter 58
y necessities of the case. We are arranging an executive office where the current business may be transacted here, and do not propose at this time definitely to fix upon a point for a seat of government in the future. I am unwilling to leave Virginia, and do not know where, within her borders, the requisite houses for the departments could be found. While employed in preparing for the defence of Danville, no trustworthy information in regard to Lee's army was received, until Lieutenant John Sargent Wise of Virginia, who declined to be paroled at Appomattox, arrived, from whom it was learned that when he left Lee's army, it was about to be surrendered. Other unofficial information soon followed, of such circumstantial character as to confirm these reports. How Mr. Davis bore defeat is best described by the following letter, written by Mr. Davis's faithful friend, M. H. Clarke, whose opportunities of knowing the President were better than those of another less intimately associa
M. H. Clarke (search for this): chapter 58
the defence of Danville, no trustworthy information in regard to Lee's army was received, until Lieutenant John Sargent Wise of Virginia, who declined to be paroled at Appomattox, arrived, from whom it was learned that when he left Lee's army, it was about to be surrendered. Other unofficial information soon followed, of such circumstantial character as to confirm these reports. How Mr. Davis bore defeat is best described by the following letter, written by Mr. Davis's faithful friend, M. H. Clarke, whose opportunities of knowing the President were better than those of another less intimately associated with him in a time of great trial. Clarksville, Tenn., October 6, 1890. My Dear Mrs. Davis: The history of his country is indissolubly woven with your honored husband, and therefore I offer my individual impressions of him in scenes which are yet unwritten. The sum of such impressions helps to give an idea of one phase of his manysided individuality, both simple and grand, whic
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 58
sident's account of the evacuation of Richmond. I give Mr. Davis's story of the evacuation of Richmond in his own words. General Lee's army. Upon his arrival at Danville, President Davis wrote to Mrs. Davis as follows: Danville, Va., April Mrs. Davis as follows: Danville, Va., April 5, 1865. I have in vain sought to get into communication with General Lee, and have postponed writing in the hope that until those of the army are better developed. From President Davis to Mrs. Davis. Danville, Va., April 6, 1865. In mMrs. Davis. Danville, Va., April 6, 1865. In my letter of yesterday I gave you all of my prospects which could now be told, not having heard from General Lee, and having ircumstantial character as to confirm these reports. How Mr. Davis bore defeat is best described by the following letter, written by Mr. Davis's faithful friend, M. H. Clarke, whose opportunities of knowing the President were better than those of aneat trial. Clarksville, Tenn., October 6, 1890. My Dear Mrs. Davis: The history of his country is indissolubly woven wit
G. W. C. Lee (search for this): chapter 58
nday, April 2d, while I was in St. Paul's Church, General Lee's telegram announcing his speedy withdrawal from n for our removal that night, simultaneously with General Lee's from Petersburg. The event was foreseen, and sstation, started for Danville, whither I supposed General Lee would proceed with his army. Here he promptlyrgetic efforts were made to collect supplies for General Lee's army. Upon his arrival at Danville, Presideave in vain sought to get into communication with General Lee, and have postponed writing in the hope that I wot of church to receive a telegram announcing that General Lee could not hold his position longer than till nights which could now be told, not having heard from General Lee, and having to conform my movements to the milita of Danville, no trustworthy information in regard to Lee's army was received, until Lieutenant John Sargent Wi, arrived, from whom it was learned that when he left Lee's army, it was about to be surrendered. Other unoffi
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