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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 71
hteous will not be forsaken has also been to me the suggestion of comfort. When Franklin was brought before the privy council of George III., and a time-serving courtier heaped the grossest indignities upon him, he bore them with composure, and afterward attributed his ability to do so to the consciousness of innocence in the acts for which he was reviled. I have no means of communicating with any one but you, and, as I understand the orders, all communications to you must pass through Washington, and be viseed. What, under Providence, may be in store for us I have no ability to foresee. I have tried to do my duty to my fellow-men, and while my penitent prayers are offered to our Heavenly Father for forgiveness of the sins committed against Him, I have the sustaining belief that He is full of mercy; and, knowing my inmost heart, will acquit me where man, blind man seeks to condemn. From our mediating Saviour I humbly trust to receive support, and, whatever may befall me in th
Limerick Plantation, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 71
hose opinions are unchanged conform his action to changed circumstances, and both classes may preserve their integrity and live and work in harmony. Our life is spent in choosing between evils, and he would be most unwise who would refuse the comparative good thus to be obtained. History is ever repeating itself, but the influence of Christianity and letters has softened its harsher features. The wail of destitute women and children who were left on the shore of Cork after the treaty of Limerick, still rings in the ears of all who love right and hate oppression; but bad as was the treatment of the Irish then, those scenes of which you were reading not long before you left Richmond, enacted by Philip of Spain in the Low Countries, were worse. The unfortunate have always been deserted and betrayed; but did ever man have less to complain of when he had lost power to serve? The critics are noisy-perhaps they hope to enhance their wares by loud crying. The multitudes are silent, why
Columbus (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 71
grew angry with Byron, you know he charged him with being miserable because of a soul of which he could not get rid. The sentinel has stamped with such noise, back and forth, in front of me, that, until another and more quiet walker comes on, and I recover from the effect produced by the attempt to write under such difficulty, I will desist . Somebody writing from Augusta to the Boston Advertiser, makes an extraordinary statement about a letter said to have been written to someone in Columbus, by Mr. A. H. Stephens, immediately after the Hampton Roads conference-containing the assertion that terms not humiliating to the South could be obtained, but that I and my principal advisers did not want peace. Of course Mr. S. could not have said anything of the sort, as he had been twice employed to seek peace, and, on the last occasion, made a report, written and oral, showing that no negotiation would be entertained. He was pressed to enlarge the written report by the addition of suc
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 71
Let us learn to say, not mine but Thy will be done. The bitterness which caused me to be so persistently slandered, has created a sentiment which will probably find vent in Congressional speeches, and test all your Christian fortitude. Remember that the end is not yet. A fair inquiry will show how false witnesses have risen up against me and laid to my charge things that I knew not of If you will recall the very early period when I was warned by letter that an emissary had been sent to Montgomery to assassinate me, you will see misconception of my position and a cruel desire for my destruction are not new-born. When the truth is revealed, the more honorable and manly of my enemies will recoil from further association with the others. Truth and the common sense of justice will generally protect the innocent, where the trial is according to the due course of law, and is sure to vindicate the memory of a victim. There is an unseen hand which upholds me, save when my thoughts are co
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 71
is no occasion, now, to make Frankensteins. Like ready-made clothing, they wait in abundance for customers. When Roberts grew angry with Byron, you know he charged him with being miserable because of a soul of which he could not get rid. The sentinel has stamped with such noise, back and forth, in front of me, that, until another and more quiet walker comes on, and I recover from the effect produced by the attempt to write under such difficulty, I will desist . Somebody writing from Augusta to the Boston Advertiser, makes an extraordinary statement about a letter said to have been written to someone in Columbus, by Mr. A. H. Stephens, immediately after the Hampton Roads conference-containing the assertion that terms not humiliating to the South could be obtained, but that I and my principal advisers did not want peace. Of course Mr. S. could not have said anything of the sort, as he had been twice employed to seek peace, and, on the last occasion, made a report, written and o
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 71
e so nobly shown their readiness to do their Master's work in relieving the afflicted and protecting the fatherless. They have sent thus the sweetest solace to one in the condition of Him, who went down from Jerusalem to Jericho. I feel with you, that God has been very good to us Reagan I knew to be a true-hearted, consistent man, and I never gave the least heed to the newspaper reports which attributed to him participation in censorious remarks against me during his confinement at Fort Warren. Some men I had to trust because of the confidence others had in them. When disaster fell upon me their desertion did not surprise me. I recently saw that Davis had been arrested; also, that a general petition for his release has been gotten up in North Carolina, which it was expected would be effectual. The proverb in relation to the desire of misery for companionship is not realized by me in this matter of imprisonment. I would that, like one of old, it were for me to say, I alo
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 71
degrade. Beyond this world there is a sure retreat for the oppressed; and posterity justifies the memory of those who fall unjustly. To our own purblind view there is much which is wrong, but to deny what is right is to question the wisdom of Providence or the existence of the mediatorial government. Every intelligent man knows that my office did not make me the custodian of public money, but such slanders impose on and serve to inflame the ignorant — the very ignorant — who don't know howe consciousness of innocence in the acts for which he was reviled. I have no means of communicating with any one but you, and, as I understand the orders, all communications to you must pass through Washington, and be viseed. What, under Providence, may be in store for us I have no ability to foresee. I have tried to do my duty to my fellow-men, and while my penitent prayers are offered to our Heavenly Father for forgiveness of the sins committed against Him, I have the sustaining belief
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 71
rs. Davis. the intervening letters are simply records of suffering, deprivation, and fortitude under the trial. Fortress Monroe, Va., October 11, 1865. On the second of this month I was removed to a room on the second floor of a house built foregret that you did not keep the things which had a value from association, instead of leaving them in the valise. Fortress Monroe, Va., November 3, 1865. I am sustained by a Power I know not of. The Protector of the fatherless and the widow, I ammy gratitude. My faith tells me that our merciful Father will give us whatever it is expedient we should have. Fortress Monroe, November 21, 1865. To make the best of the existing condition is alike required by patriotism and practical senw. Shut out from the ever-changing world, I live in the past with a vividness only thus to be accounted for. Fortress Monroe, Va., December 7, 1865. I am deeply impressed by the kindness of the Bishop, and that of the priests who have so nob
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 71
very good to us Reagan I knew to be a true-hearted, consistent man, and I never gave the least heed to the newspaper reports which attributed to him participation in censorious remarks against me during his confinement at Fort Warren. Some men I had to trust because of the confidence others had in them. When disaster fell upon me their desertion did not surprise me. I recently saw that Davis had been arrested; also, that a general petition for his release has been gotten up in North Carolina, which it was expected would be effectual. The proverb in relation to the desire of misery for companionship is not realized by me in this matter of imprisonment. I would that, like one of old, it were for me to say, I alone am left. To me — as it must to you — it is sometimes a puzzle to find the rule of discrimination. In such a situation Hume's balance is peculiarly to be sought. As natural rights belong only to those who can maintain them, so natural affections and excitements
as rapidly as has been usual with me, after becoming convalescent. I am deeply indebted to my attending physician, who has been to me much more than that term usually conveys. In all my times of trouble, new evidences have been given me of God's merciful love. The Herald claims to give me regular information concerning my family, but if it did contain such news, as I only get occasionally a copy, the promise would be unfulfilled. I have lately read the Suffering Saviour, by the Reverend Dr. Krumacher, and was deeply impressed with the dignity, the sublime patience of the model of Christianity, as contrasted with the brutal vindictiveness of unregenerate man; and with the similitude of the portrait given of the Jews to the fierce prosecutions which pursued the Revolutionists after the restoration of the Stuarts. One is led to ask, Did Sir Henry Vane and the Duke of Argyle imitate the more than human virtue of our Saviour, or was their conduct the inspiration of a conscience voi
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