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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. Search the whole document.

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ander has already given in your columns the after-fate of this fund. While at Washington, Ga., communications were received from General John C. Breckinridge, that payments had been promised by him to the cavalry from the train. General Breckinridge's action was ratified, and President Davis gave some other directions before he left. General Breckinridge arrived in Washington, Ga., an hour or so after President Davis left.-My recollection of his statement was that during the night of the 3d, en route from Abbeville, S. C., to Washington, Ga., he found the cavalry and train at a halt, resting. Stopping, he learned from the officers that the men were dissatisfied at the position of affairs; that they were guarding a train which could not be carried safely much farther; the Federal cavalry were known to be in full force not a great distance off; the destination and disposition of their own force was an uncertain one; their paper money was worthless for their needs; that they might
s acknowledged by telegraph, and an answer promised. After waiting several days to no purpose, Colonel Mason returned without one. When Mr. Davis was informed of the above statement by one who had read the Narrative, he wrote to Colonel Anderson, referred to book and page, and inquired what letter from him as there described he had received. He responded as follows: Richmond, Va., December 21, 1880. The Honorable Jefferson Davis, Beauvoir, Miss. My Dear Sir: Your letter of the 17th instant was duly received. I am sorry to say that my memory does not enable me to give you any assistance in regard to the matter mentioned at page 408 of General Johnston's Narrative, to which you direct my attention. I do not remember anything connected with the subject, except that there was a payment of silver coin to the army at Greensborough, and I have no papers which would afford information. Yours truly, Archer Anderson. Mr. Davis wrote: Not recollecting to have met Colonel Mason
January 10th (search for this): chapter 80
ving a small medal made of it as a memento of the last days of the Confederacy. I have no knowledge of what became of the rest of the amount, whatever it may have been, that the Government sent away or brought away from Richmond. The statement of Captain M. H. Clark, of Clarksville, Tenn., who was acting treasurer at the time of the surrender, is very full and explicit. It was given in the Courier-Journal, Louisville, Friday, January 13, 1882, and is as follows: Clarksville, Tenn., January 10th. As the papers of late have been full of communications from ex-Confederates in regard to the Confederate Treasury matters, called out by a reported interview with General J. E. Johnston with a reporter of the Philadelphia Press, and as I have it in my power to rive a true history of the last days of the Confederate Treasury from the written documents of that period still in my possession, I have decided to prevent any further controversy, and show what were the specie assets of the C
April 11th (search for this): chapter 80
less he yet felt a profound confidence that what he said would not be made public. The history of the disposition of the Confederate treasure is given in extenso below, and the case is rested on the evidence. It is not all quoted, because my memoir has been extended much more than was anticipated, and I am obliged to cut out very valuable matter which will be found available to any future biographer or historian in the rooms of the Louisiana Historical building, at New Orleans. On April 11th Mr. Davis, being at Greensborough, S. C., issued the following order to Mr. J. N. Hendren, Treasurer of the Confederate States: You will report to General Beauregard with the treasure in your possession, that he may give it due protection, as a military chest, to be moved with his army train. For further instructions you will report to the Secretary of the Treasury. (Signed) Jefferson Davis. Official. (Signed) F. R. Lubbock, Colonel and A. D. C. General Johnston, in his N
April 19th (search for this): chapter 80
You will report to General Beauregard with the treasure in your possession, that he may give it due protection, as a military chest, to be moved with his army train. For further instructions you will report to the Secretary of the Treasury. (Signed) Jefferson Davis. Official. (Signed) F. R. Lubbock, Colonel and A. D. C. General Johnston, in his Narrative, page 408, says: I arrived in Greensborough, near which the Confederate troops were in bivouac, before daybreak on April 19th. Colonel Archer Anderson, Adjutant-General of the army, gave me two papers addressed to me by the President. The first directed me to obtain from Mr. J. N. Hendren, treasury agent, thirty-nine thousand dollars in silver, which was in his hands, subject to my order, and to use it as the military chest of the army. The second, received subsequently by Colonel Anderson, directed me to send this money to the President, at Charlotte. This order was not obeyed, however. As only the military
t were the specie assets of the Confederate States at the time of the dissolution of its Government. General surprise has been felt at General Johnston's tardiness in disavowing his connection with the unworthy insinuations against the Confederate President and Cabinet in the article referred to. I will state as briefly as possible my connection with the Confederate Treasury. The President from Danville proceeded to Charlotte, N. C. We arrived at Abbeville, S. C., the morning of May 2d. At Abbeville, S. C., the Treasury officers reported the train at the depot, having been a part of the time under the escort of Admiral Raphael Semmes's little naval force to protect it from the Federal cavalry, who were raiding on a parallel line with our route, between us and the mountains. Mr. G. A. Trenholm, the Secretary of the Treasury, having been left quite ill near the Catawba River, the President appointed the Postmaster-General, Honorable John H. Reagan, acting Secretary of the
December 17th (search for this): chapter 80
spent in the cause, except what was seized, appropriated, or destroyed by the enemy; the last has been persistently assailed by all which falsehood could invent and malignity employ. I am ever affectionately yours, Jefferson Davis. C. J. Wright, Chicago. On December 18, 188r, there appeared in the Philadelphia Press the following extraordinary publication: Confederate gold missing. General Johnston calls Jefferson Davis to account for over $2,000,000 in specie. Philadelphia, December 17th.- The Press will publish to-morrow an interview with General Joseph E. Johnston, in which he charges that Jefferson Davis received a very large sum of money belonging to the Confederate Treasury at the evacuation of Richmond, for which he has never accounted. In the course of his remarks he says: I had learned from General Beauregard that Mr. Davis had a large amount of specie in his possession, and I wrote urging that a portion of it be paid to the soldiers then in active service.
December 18th (search for this): chapter 80
e with it. I will write to Mr. Reagan and ask him to answer your inquiries. The fact is, I staked all my property and reputation in the defence of State rights and constitutional liberty, as I understood them. The first I spent in the cause, except what was seized, appropriated, or destroyed by the enemy; the last has been persistently assailed by all which falsehood could invent and malignity employ. I am ever affectionately yours, Jefferson Davis. C. J. Wright, Chicago. On December 18, 188r, there appeared in the Philadelphia Press the following extraordinary publication: Confederate gold missing. General Johnston calls Jefferson Davis to account for over $2,000,000 in specie. Philadelphia, December 17th.- The Press will publish to-morrow an interview with General Joseph E. Johnston, in which he charges that Jefferson Davis received a very large sum of money belonging to the Confederate Treasury at the evacuation of Richmond, for which he has never accounted. I
December 29th (search for this): chapter 80
Although there are many more statements, letters, etc., in my possession respecting General Johnston's charge, and unfortunately lack of space has forced me to condense Colonel Clark's statement too closely, for the same reason I will present but one more, that of Colonel W. Preston Johnston, who was aide to the President, and with it submit the case. Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La., January 6, 1882. General Joseph R. Davis, New Orleans, La. My Dear Sir: Your letter of December 29th, in relation to an alleged interview of General Joseph E. Johnston reflecting upon President Davis, has been received. I was greatly surprised when I first saw the report of the interview; but still more so when I found that General Johnston did not contradict it with an emphatic denial. If I had supposed that its insinuations required disproof, or that they would not be met by witnesses more fully informed than myself, I certainly should have promptly published such knowledge as I had
May 4th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 80
easury matters, and I was ordered to report to him, and doing so, was handed my commission, which is now before me and reads as follows, viz.: Washington, Ga., May 4, 1865. M. H. Clark, Esq., is hereby appointed Acting Treasurer of the Confederate States, and is authorized to act as such during the absence of the Treasurer. it as if disbursed by myself, and covered it into the Treasury accounts by the paper of which below is a copy: Confederate States of America, Washington, Ga., May 4, 1865. Honorable J. C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War : There is required for payment of troops now on the march through Georgia, the sum of one hundred and eight ry vouchers, warrant hereafter to be drawn when settlement can be regularly made. John H. Reagan, Acting Secretary of Treasury. (Indorsed.) Washington, Ga., May 4, 1865. Received of M. H. Clark, Acting Treasurer, C. S., the sum of one hundred and eight thousand three hundred and twenty-two dollars and ninety cents ($108,322.
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