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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 16 total hits in 9 results.

Seven Pines (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
The Confederate loss at seven Pines.-letter from General J. E. Johnston. [We take pleasure in publishing — the following letter from General Johnston, which explains itself, as we are always ready to make explanations or corrections of any thing that we may put into our Papers.] Richmond, June 22d, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir: Major-General Longstreet's report of the battle of Seven Pines, as published in your Society's Papers-May and June, 1877-differs materially from his official report made to me, the commander of the Confederate army on that occasion. The difference is in the interpolation of a list of killed, wounded, and missing in the paper you published. No such list was in the official report. General Longstreet's statement of his loss is in the sentence of his report next to the last, viz: A rough estimate of the loss on this part of the field may be put down at 3,000 killed and wounded. This estimate was a
J. E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 6
The Confederate loss at seven Pines.-letter from General J. E. Johnston. [We take pleasure in publishing — the following letter from General Johnston, which explains itself, as we are always ready to make explanations or corrections of any thing that we may put into our Papers.] Richmond, June 22d, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir: Major-General Longstreet's report of the battle of Seven Pines, as published in your Society's Papers-May andthe same report, and in such juxtaposition, that his loss was about 3,000, and that it was 4,851. Most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston. [It is due to ourselves to say, in reference to the above, that we printed General Longstreet's report from a verbatim copy of the one recorded in the letter book kept at his own headquarters, and that we, of course, had no reason to suspect that it was in any particular different from the original report sent to General Johnston.]
J. S. D. Cullen (search for this): chapter 6
me, the commander of the Confederate army on that occasion. The difference is in the interpolation of a list of killed, wounded, and missing in the paper you published. No such list was in the official report. General Longstreet's statement of his loss is in the sentence of his report next to the last, viz: A rough estimate of the loss on this part of the field may be put down at 3,000 killed and wounded. This estimate was after he had received the report of his chief surgeon, Dr. J. S. D. Cullen.-See 3d paragraph from the end of the report. It is not to be supposed that General Longstreet would have written in the same report, and in such juxtaposition, that his loss was about 3,000, and that it was 4,851. Most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston. [It is due to ourselves to say, in reference to the above, that we printed General Longstreet's report from a verbatim copy of the one recorded in the letter book kept at his own headquarters, and that w
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 6
apers.] Richmond, June 22d, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir: Major-General Longstreet's report of the battle of Seven Pines, as published in your Society's Papers-May and June, 1877-differs materialon of a list of killed, wounded, and missing in the paper you published. No such list was in the official report. General Longstreet's statement of his loss is in the sentence of his report next to the last, viz: A rough estimate of the loss on thi chief surgeon, Dr. J. S. D. Cullen.-See 3d paragraph from the end of the report. It is not to be supposed that General Longstreet would have written in the same report, and in such juxtaposition, that his loss was about 3,000, and that it was 4,r obedient servant, J. E. Johnston. [It is due to ourselves to say, in reference to the above, that we printed General Longstreet's report from a verbatim copy of the one recorded in the letter book kept at his own headquarters, and that we, of
J. William Jones (search for this): chapter 6
The Confederate loss at seven Pines.-letter from General J. E. Johnston. [We take pleasure in publishing — the following letter from General Johnston, which explains itself, as we are always ready to make explanations or corrections of any thing that we may put into our Papers.] Richmond, June 22d, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir: Major-General Longstreet's report of the battle of Seven Pines, as published in your Society's Papers-May and June, 1877-differs materially from his official report made to me, the commander of the Confederate army on that occasion. The difference is in the interpolation of a list of killed, wounded, and missing in the paper you published. No such list was in the official report. General Longstreet's statement of his loss is in the sentence of his report next to the last, viz: A rough estimate of the loss on this part of the field may be put down at 3,000 killed and wounded. This estimate was af
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 6
The Confederate loss at seven Pines.-letter from General J. E. Johnston. [We take pleasure in publishing — the following letter from General Johnston, which explains itself, as we are always ready to make explanations or corrections of any thing that we may put into our Papers.] Richmond, June 22d, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir: Major-General Longstreet's report of the battle of Seven Pines, as published in your Society's Papers-May andend of the report. It is not to be supposed that General Longstreet would have written in the same report, and in such juxtaposition, that his loss was about 3,000, and that it was 4,851. Most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston. [It is due to ourselves to say, in reference to the above, that we printed General Longstreet's report from a verbatim copy of the one recorded in the letter book kept at his own headquarters, and that we, of course, had no reason to suspec
May, 1877 AD (search for this): chapter 6
The Confederate loss at seven Pines.-letter from General J. E. Johnston. [We take pleasure in publishing — the following letter from General Johnston, which explains itself, as we are always ready to make explanations or corrections of any thing that we may put into our Papers.] Richmond, June 22d, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir: Major-General Longstreet's report of the battle of Seven Pines, as published in your Society's Papers-May and June, 1877-differs materially from his official report made to me, the commander of the Confederate army on that occasion. The difference is in the interpolation of a list of killed, wounded, and missing in the paper you published. No such list was in the official report. General Longstreet's statement of his loss is in the sentence of his report next to the last, viz: A rough estimate of the loss on this part of the field may be put down at 3,000 killed and wounded. This estimate was a
June, 1877 AD (search for this): chapter 6
Confederate loss at seven Pines.-letter from General J. E. Johnston. [We take pleasure in publishing — the following letter from General Johnston, which explains itself, as we are always ready to make explanations or corrections of any thing that we may put into our Papers.] Richmond, June 22d, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir: Major-General Longstreet's report of the battle of Seven Pines, as published in your Society's Papers-May and June, 1877-differs materially from his official report made to me, the commander of the Confederate army on that occasion. The difference is in the interpolation of a list of killed, wounded, and missing in the paper you published. No such list was in the official report. General Longstreet's statement of his loss is in the sentence of his report next to the last, viz: A rough estimate of the loss on this part of the field may be put down at 3,000 killed and wounded. This estimate was after he
June 22nd, 1877 AD (search for this): chapter 6
The Confederate loss at seven Pines.-letter from General J. E. Johnston. [We take pleasure in publishing — the following letter from General Johnston, which explains itself, as we are always ready to make explanations or corrections of any thing that we may put into our Papers.] Richmond, June 22d, 1877. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir: Major-General Longstreet's report of the battle of Seven Pines, as published in your Society's Papers-May and June, 1877-differs materially from his official report made to me, the commander of the Confederate army on that occasion. The difference is in the interpolation of a list of killed, wounded, and missing in the paper you published. No such list was in the official report. General Longstreet's statement of his loss is in the sentence of his report next to the last, viz: A rough estimate of the loss on this part of the field may be put down at 3,000 killed and wounded. This estimate was af