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Perryville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.14
giment, whose brave dead spoke its eulogy. Major Charles Guillet, acting Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding the right, contributed much to steady this exposed flank of the command. I am indebted chiefly to Captain M. 0. Tracy, acting Major, and in charge of the left wing, for the steadiness with which it moved forward and for its handsome behavior on retiring. This officer has been mentioned in every report of various battles in which the regiment has been engaged-Shiloh, Farmington, Perryville — and having lost his leg in this action, I would especially commend him to the favorable consideration of our superior officers. To Captains King, Bishop, and Ryan, the praise of having borne them themselves with great efficiency and marked courage is especially due. Adjutant Hugh H. Bein acted with becoming coolness and efficiency, and to the color-bearer, Sergeant Roger Tammure, and Sergeant-Major John Farrell, great credit is due for their disregard of personal danger and soldie
Manchester, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.14
ough the fire of Wednesday. Mr. Buckner and Mr. Zantzinger, of Kentucky, attached themselves to me for the oocasion and were active and zealous. Captain Blackburn, commanding my escort, ever cool and vigilant, rendered essential service, and made several bold reconnoisances. Charles Choutard of the escort, acting as my orderly on Wednesday, displayed much gallantry and intelligence. The army retired before daybreak on the morning of the 4th of January. My division, moving on the Manchester road, was the rear of Hardee's corps. The Ninth Kentucky, Forty-first Alabama, and Cobb's battery, all under the command of Colonel Hunt, formed a special rear-guard. The enemy did not follow us. My acknowledgments are due to Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston, Lieutenant-Colonel Brent, and Lieutenant-Colonel Garner, of General Bragg's staff, and to Major Pickett, of Lieutenant-General Hardee's staff, for services on Friday, the 2d of January. Respectfully, your obedient servant, John C.
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.14
(horse shot); Captain Semple, ordnance officer; Lieutenant Darragh, severely wounded. Captains Martin and Coleman, of my volunteer staff, were active and efficient. The former had his horse killed under him. 217 Drs. Heustis and Pendleton, Chief Surgeon and Medical Inspector, were unremitting in attention to the wounded. Dr. Stanhope Breckinridge, Assistant Surgeon, accompanied my headquarters, and pursued his duties through the fire of Wednesday. Mr. Buckner and Mr. Zantzinger, of Kentucky, attached themselves to me for the oocasion and were active and zealous. Captain Blackburn, commanding my escort, ever cool and vigilant, rendered essential service, and made several bold reconnoisances. Charles Choutard of the escort, acting as my orderly on Wednesday, displayed much gallantry and intelligence. The army retired before daybreak on the morning of the 4th of January. My division, moving on the Manchester road, was the rear of Hardee's corps. The Ninth Kentucky, For
Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.14
ear-guard. The enemy did not follow us. My acknowledgments are due to Colonel J. Stoddard Johnston, Lieutenant-Colonel Brent, and Lieutenant-Colonel Garner, of General Bragg's staff, and to Major Pickett, of Lieutenant-General Hardee's staff, for services on Friday, the 2d of January. Respectfully, your obedient servant, John C. Breckinridge, Major-General, C. S. A. Report of Colonel R. L. Gibson. headquarters Adams' brigade, Breckinridge's division, Hardee's corps, A. T., Tullahoma, January 11th, 1863. Colonel T. O'Hara, A. A. A. G.: Sir: I beg leave to submit the following report of the part taken by the Thirteenth Louisiana volunteers in the action of the 31st: We were posted on the right of Adams' brigade, the right of the regiment resting near the river and the two left companies overlapping the rail-track. We advanced in line of battle until we reached the houses destroyed by fire, and the point at which the ground swelled into a considerable hill, stretc
Farmington, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.14
e gallant regiment, whose brave dead spoke its eulogy. Major Charles Guillet, acting Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding the right, contributed much to steady this exposed flank of the command. I am indebted chiefly to Captain M. 0. Tracy, acting Major, and in charge of the left wing, for the steadiness with which it moved forward and for its handsome behavior on retiring. This officer has been mentioned in every report of various battles in which the regiment has been engaged-Shiloh, Farmington, Perryville — and having lost his leg in this action, I would especially commend him to the favorable consideration of our superior officers. To Captains King, Bishop, and Ryan, the praise of having borne them themselves with great efficiency and marked courage is especially due. Adjutant Hugh H. Bein acted with becoming coolness and efficiency, and to the color-bearer, Sergeant Roger Tammure, and Sergeant-Major John Farrell, great credit is due for their disregard of personal dange
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 3.14
officers who fell, nor the living who nobly did their duty; yet I may be permitted to lament, in common with the army, the premature death of Brigadier-General Hanson, who received a mortal wound at the moment the enemy began to give way. Endeared to his friends by his private virtues, and to his command by the vigilance with which he guarded its interest and honor, he was, by the universal testimony of his military associates, one of the finest officers that adorned the service of the Confederate States. Upon his fall the command devolved on Colonel Trabue, who in another organization had long and ably commanded most of the regiments composing the brigade. I cannot close without expressing my obligations to the gentlemen of my staff. This is no formal acknowledgement. I can never forget that during all the operations they were ever prompt and cheerful by night and day in conveying orders, conducting to their positions regiments and brigades, rallying troops on the field, and, in
Stone River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.14
have the honor to report the operations of this division of Lieutenant-General Hardee's corps in the recent battles of Stone River in front of Murfreesboroa. The character and course of Stone river and the nature of the ground in front of the towStone river and the nature of the ground in front of the town are well known, and as the report of the General Commanding will no doubt be accompanied by a sketch, it is not necessary to describe them here. On the morning of Sunday the 28th of December, the brigades moved from their encampments and took u: Adams' brigade on the right, with its right resting on the Lebanon road and its left extending towards the ford over Stone river a short distance below the destroyed bridge on the Nashville turnpike; Preston on the left of Adams; Palmer on the lefn was moved to the west side of the Lebanon road to connect with the general line of battle. All the ground east of Stone river was now to be held by one division, which in a single line did not extend from the ford to the Lebanon road. I did no
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.14
vision, after deducting the losses of Wednesday, the troops left on the hill and companies on special service, consisted of some 4,500 men. It was drawn up in two lines, the first in a narrow skirt of woods, the second two hundred yards in rear. Pillow and Hanson formed the first line, Pillow on the right. Preston supported Pillow, and Adams' brigade (commanded by Colonel Gibson) supported Hanson. The artillery was placed in rear of the second line under orders to move with it and occupy the Pillow on the right. Preston supported Pillow, and Adams' brigade (commanded by Colonel Gibson) supported Hanson. The artillery was placed in rear of the second line under orders to move with it and occupy the summit of the slope as soon as the infantry should rout the enemy. Feeling anxious about my right, I sent two staff officers in succession to communicate with Pegram and Wharton, but received no intelligence up to the moment of assault. The interval between my left and the troops on the hill was already too great, but I had a battery to watch it with a small infantry support. There was nothing to prevent the enemy from observing nearly all our movements and preparations. To reach him it wa
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.14
g (who had twice ridden carefully over the ground with me) and the General commanding, who had personally inspected the lines, it was the strongest position the nature of the ground would allow. About six hundred yards in front of Hanson's center was an eminence which it was deemed important to hold. It commanded the ground sloping towards the river in its front and on its left, and also the plain on the west bank occupied by the right of Withers' line. Colonel Hunt with the Fortyfirst Alabama, the Sixth and Ninth Kentucky, and Cobb's battery, all of Hanson's brigade, was ordered to take and hold this hill, which he did, repulsing several brisk attacks of the enemy, and losing some excellent officers and men. A few hundred yards to the left and rear of this position a small earthwork, thrown up under the direction of Major Graves, my Chief of Artillery, was held during a part of the operations by Semple's battery of Napoleon guns. In the afternoon of Tuesday, the 30th, I recei
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.14
west bank of the river. About twilight Brigadier-General Aiiderson reported to me with his brigade, and remained in position with me until the army retired. I took up line of battle for the night a little in rear of the field over which we advanced to the assault, and Captain Robertson at my request disposed the artillery in the positions indicated for it. Many of the reports do not discriminate between the losses of Wednesday and Friday. The total loss in my division, exclusive of Jackson's command, is 2,140, of which, I think, 1,700 occurred on Friday. The loss of the enemy on this day was, I think, greater than our own, since he suffered immense slaughter between the ridge and the river. I cannot forbear to express my admiration for the courage and constancy of the troops, exhibited even after it became apparent that the main object could not be accomplished. Beyond the general good conduct, a number of enlisted men displayed at different periods of the action the mos
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