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Mercersburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
ll to its lot the week previous. It formed part of an expeditionary force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery which was detached from the Second corps on the 24th June, under the command of Brigadier-General George H. Steuart, and ordered to Mercersburg and McConnellsburg. In the execution of the duty assigned it was required to perform some heavy marching, as the following itinerary record will show: Tuesday, June 23, 1863.--Broke camp near Sharpsburg, and passing through Hagerstown, halted 5 miles beyond at 3 o'clock. Distance, 17 miles. Wednesday, June 24.--Moved at 4{-A. M. At Greencastle filed to the left on the road to Mercersburg. Entered McConnellsburg about 9 P. M., after a march of 24 miles. Friday, June 26.-Marched from McConnellsburg to Chambersburg, 20 miles, through a steady rain. The cavalry under Major Gilmore captured 60 head of cattle, 40 horses, a few mules, and some militia. Saturday, June 27.-Column moved at 7½ A. M., through Shippensburg, to
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
d 5 miles beyond at 3 o'clock. Distance, 17 miles. Wednesday, June 24.--Moved at 4{-A. M. At Greencastle filed to the left on the road to Mercersburg. Entered McConnellsburg about 9 P. M., after a march of 24 miles. Friday, June 26.-Marched from McConnellsburg to Chambersburg, 20 miles, through a steady rain. The cavalry under Major Gilmore captured 60 head of cattle, 40 horses, a few mules, and some militia. Saturday, June 27.-Column moved at 7½ A. M., through Shippensburg, to Springfield. Men much broken down, having marched 19 miles, many of them barefooted. Sunday, June 28.-After a short march of 6 or 7 miles made camp at 2 P. M. about 5 miles south of Carlisle. Rejoined our division to-day. Monday, June 29.--About 9 A. M. received orders to march back to Chambersbu'rg. Great surprise expressed. Marched 11 miles and camped 1 mile south of Stowstown. Tuesday, June 30.--Column moved at 5 A. M. Passed through Shippensburg, to Greenvillage, where we took left
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
55. Another estimate (by the orderly sergeant of Company A) puts it at 62. My diary states that the brigade mustered about 2,200 before the battle. At Hagerstown, on the 8th July, about 1,200 men reported for duty. It is probable that others subsequently came in, as I cannot think the loss was so high as 1,000 men, in the face of the following entry in my diary July 4: Total loss in the brigade (killed, wounded, and missing) 680. There were probably many stragglers on the march to Williamsport, some of whom may have been taken prisoners; but many no doubt afterwards came in. Perhaps the entire loss might be put at 800. What a field was this! For three hours of the previous evening, and seven of the morning, had the most terrible elements of destruction known to modern warfare been wielded with a might and dexterity rarely if ever paralleled. The woods in which the battle had been fought was torn and rent with shells and solid shot and pierced with innumerable minnie balls.
Culp's Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
ve. It was past 6 P. M. before our brigade was ordered forward-nearly twenty-four hours after we had gotten into position. We were to storm the eastern face of Culp's Hill, a rough and rugged eminence on the southeast of the town, which formed the key to the enemy's right-centre. Passing first through a small skirt of woods, we anthly, July, 1876. I was at a loss to account for it until I observed that General Howard describes the vacated works as situated between McAllister's Mill and Culp's Hill. Fronm these works part of the Twelfth corps had been withdrawn to reinforce Meade's left But these were not the works occupied by Steuart's brigade, whose cha(10 to 11) the right of the works was held by the brigade of General Daniel. Then came General Ewell's order to assume the offensive and assail the crest of Culp's Hill, on our right. My diary says that both General Steuart and General Daniel, who now came up with his brigade to support the movement, strongly disapproved of ma
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
ed orders to march back to Chambersbu'rg. Great surprise expressed. Marched 11 miles and camped 1 mile south of Stowstown. Tuesday, June 30.--Column moved at 5 A. M. Passed through Shippensburg, to Greenvillage, where we took left road to Fayetteville. Wednesday, July 1.--Column moved at 7 A. M. Passed through Fayetteville. On top of mountain heard rapid cannonading. Soon saw the smoke of the battle, and then of burning houses. Hurried to the; front, but the battle was over. DistanceFayetteville. On top of mountain heard rapid cannonading. Soon saw the smoke of the battle, and then of burning houses. Hurried to the; front, but the battle was over. Distance from our camp on Monday to Gettysburg, 35 miles. This was marched by the brigade on Tuesday and Wednesday. It may have been a greater distance; it was not less. Our camp on the night of the 30th must have been not far east or west of Greenwood. Thus it appears that the men of the Third brigade had marched, within the nine days preceding the battle, at least 133, perhaps as much as 138 miles. But, though weary and footsore, they moved forward with alacrity to take part in the great conflic
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
he execution of the duty assigned it was required to perform some heavy marching, as the following itinerary record will show: Tuesday, June 23, 1863.--Broke camp near Sharpsburg, and passing through Hagerstown, halted 5 miles beyond at 3 o'clock. Distance, 17 miles. Wednesday, June 24.--Moved at 4{-A. M. At Greencastle filed to the left on the road to Mercersburg. Entered McConnellsburg about 9 P. M., after a march of 24 miles. Friday, June 26.-Marched from McConnellsburg to Chambersburg, 20 miles, through a steady rain. The cavalry under Major Gilmore captured 60 head of cattle, 40 horses, a few mules, and some militia. Saturday, June 27.-Column moved at 7½ A. M., through Shippensburg, to Springfield. Men much broken down, having marched 19 miles, many of them barefooted. Sunday, June 28.-After a short march of 6 or 7 miles made camp at 2 P. M. about 5 miles south of Carlisle. Rejoined our division to-day. Monday, June 29.--About 9 A. M. received orders to m
Balaklava (Ukraine) (search for this): chapter 3.27
overshadowed.-Page 145. And speaking of the state of the hill on the 4th: We came upon numberless forms clad in grey, either stark and stiff or else still weltering in their blood. .... Turning whichever way we chose, the eye rested upon human forms lying in all imaginable positions. . . . We were surprised at the accuracy as well as the bloody results of our fire. It was indeed dreadful to witness. --Bates' Gettysburg, page 145. These fearful losses sufficiently indicate the character of the work those brave men were called on to do. The Light Brigade at Balaklava lost about one-third of their number (247 men out of 673 officers and men) in their famous charge. That, indeed, was over in twenty minutes, while these two regiments sustained their loss of one-half and two-thirds during a conflict of ten hours duration. But at least we may claim for the men of the Third brigade that they maintained a long and unequal contest with a valor and a constancy worthy of the best troops.
Shippensburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
ne 26.-Marched from McConnellsburg to Chambersburg, 20 miles, through a steady rain. The cavalry under Major Gilmore captured 60 head of cattle, 40 horses, a few mules, and some militia. Saturday, June 27.-Column moved at 7½ A. M., through Shippensburg, to Springfield. Men much broken down, having marched 19 miles, many of them barefooted. Sunday, June 28.-After a short march of 6 or 7 miles made camp at 2 P. M. about 5 miles south of Carlisle. Rejoined our division to-day. Monday, June 29.--About 9 A. M. received orders to march back to Chambersbu'rg. Great surprise expressed. Marched 11 miles and camped 1 mile south of Stowstown. Tuesday, June 30.--Column moved at 5 A. M. Passed through Shippensburg, to Greenvillage, where we took left road to Fayetteville. Wednesday, July 1.--Column moved at 7 A. M. Passed through Fayetteville. On top of mountain heard rapid cannonading. Soon saw the smoke of the battle, and then of burning houses. Hurried to the; front, but
Carlisle, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
P. M., after a march of 24 miles. Friday, June 26.-Marched from McConnellsburg to Chambersburg, 20 miles, through a steady rain. The cavalry under Major Gilmore captured 60 head of cattle, 40 horses, a few mules, and some militia. Saturday, June 27.-Column moved at 7½ A. M., through Shippensburg, to Springfield. Men much broken down, having marched 19 miles, many of them barefooted. Sunday, June 28.-After a short march of 6 or 7 miles made camp at 2 P. M. about 5 miles south of Carlisle. Rejoined our division to-day. Monday, June 29.--About 9 A. M. received orders to march back to Chambersbu'rg. Great surprise expressed. Marched 11 miles and camped 1 mile south of Stowstown. Tuesday, June 30.--Column moved at 5 A. M. Passed through Shippensburg, to Greenvillage, where we took left road to Fayetteville. Wednesday, July 1.--Column moved at 7 A. M. Passed through Fayetteville. On top of mountain heard rapid cannonading. Soon saw the smoke of the battle, and then
Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3.27
heir arrival may be fixed by the circumstance which I distintly remember, viz: the arrival of General Lee upon the field, his survey of the enemy's position on Cemetery Hill with his glass, and the dispatch of one of his staff immediately in the direction of the town. Passing over the scene of conflict, where the line of battle re turnpike, which I think it commanded. Its capture was a breach in the enemy's lines through which troops might have been poured and the strong positions of Cemetery Hill rendered untenable. General Howard says: The ground was rough, and the woods so thick that their generals did not realize till morning what they had gained. left of the Baltimore pike [McAllister's Hill], followed the signal, and one after another opened up, till every little crest between Slocum's headquarters and Cemetery Hill began belching its thunder. . . . Still no artillery response from the rebels. --Page 143.--Atlantic Monthly, July, 1876, page 66. But all the efforts of th
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