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ing; and a detachment of pioneers, Captain Kilborn commanding, in the vicinity of Blythe's Ferry, on the Tennessee River, September thirtieth. Here I received orders to leave my train, lead horses, three pieces of the Eighteenth Indiana battery, and three howitzers, and proceed with the remainder of the command to cross Waldon's Ridge into the Sequatchee Valley, which I did, reaching the valley, crossing it, and encamped on the Cumberland range on the night of the second of October. On the third I crossed the Cumberland Mountains in rear of Colonel Minty's cavalry brigade, who skirmished with the enemy through the day. Late in the afternoon I was ordered to pass my command down the mountain to the front, and dislodge the enemy who were in possession of the main road from McMinnville to Chattanooga, and which they were stubbornly holding, skirmishing briskly with Colonel Minty's cavalry. On reaching the foot of the mountain, the command was dismounted, and the Ninety-eighth Illinois
n I went into camp by order of General Crook. During the engagement the enemy came to me with a flag of truce, which I did not receive, but ordered the bearer back, and my men not to fire on him while between my lines and those of the enemy. The Seventeenth and Seventy-second Indiana lost several wounded — the former, one killed. On the fifth I proceeded to Murfreesboro and drew three days rations for my command. On the night of the sixth I encamped several miles from Shelbyville. On the fourth, my brigade having the advance, I moved through Shelbyville, and passed out on the Farmington pike; after advancing some distance I learned that a division of the enemy were encamped at or near the Widow Sims, to my right, some distance from the main road. In compliance with orders from General Crook, I at once left the main road and proceeded in the direction the enemy were said to be, and soon came upon his pickets, which I drove in and charged the division, in line of battle, the Fourtee
on him with the artillery, at one time killing one man and four horses at one shot. Here again I dislodged him and drove him two miles, when night coming on I went into camp by order of General Crook. During the engagement the enemy came to me with a flag of truce, which I did not receive, but ordered the bearer back, and my men not to fire on him while between my lines and those of the enemy. The Seventeenth and Seventy-second Indiana lost several wounded — the former, one killed. On the fifth I proceeded to Murfreesboro and drew three days rations for my command. On the night of the sixth I encamped several miles from Shelbyville. On the fourth, my brigade having the advance, I moved through Shelbyville, and passed out on the Farmington pike; after advancing some distance I learned that a division of the enemy were encamped at or near the Widow Sims, to my right, some distance from the main road. In compliance with orders from General Crook, I at once left the main road and pr
That night, rations, quartermaster's stores and horse-shoes were drawn, and next morning, October sixth, we were again in motion. We marched on the Shelbyville pike, and having started late, it was dark when we arrived at Guy's Gap and went into camp, without having come up with the enemy. Here we heard very indefinitely that the First division was coming up behind. It was small gratification if they could not, even for one day, give us relief and rest. Again en route next day, the seventh, and arriving at Shelbyville early, we halted a few moments. A portion of the rebel column had passed through there, and robbed and pillaged every store. Passing through town, we took the Lewisburgh pike, mounted infantry in advance, Long's brigade next, and the First brigade supposed to be following. Of the Second brigade, the Third Ohio, which had rejoined the brigade near McMinnville, had the advance; next the Second Kentucky, the Fourth Ohio, and the First Ohio in the rear. Three mi
earest to Chattanooga were guarded by Wilder's brigade, Colonel Miller commanding. After him the First brigade, Colonel Minty commanding, on same duty, and Colonel Long's brigade was posted above Minty, in the neighborhood of Washington, Tennessee. I desire to say nothing about why the rebels were permitted to cross, as the officer in command at the ford where the crossing was effected will have to answer for that hereafter, probably before a military tribunal. On the morning of the thirtieth, the enemy crossed in force of four divisions — Wharton's, Martin's, Davidson's, and Armstrong's — the whole under command of Wheeler. When General Crook learned they were across, notwithstanding his precautions, he immediately ordered the regiments on duty above to move down the river and rejoin him, which they did, finding the General four miles below Smith's cross-roads, and about twelve below Washington. Next morning, October first, a reconnoissance to the cross-roads, by the Fou
September 26th (search for this): chapter 184
Doc. 181.-Wheeler's raid in Tennessee. A National account. Maysville, Ala., October 19, 1863. General Crook, commanding Second cavalry division, after participating in the battle of Chickamauga, was ordered to take the Second brigade, Colonel Eli Long commanding, with five days rations, up the north side of Tennessee River, to guard the fords. There were no rations to be had, excepting three days of hard bread, and he started on this duty. September twenty-sixth arrived at his destination, and all was quiet till the morning of the thirtieth. The fords nearest to Chattanooga were guarded by Wilder's brigade, Colonel Miller commanding. After him the First brigade, Colonel Minty commanding, on same duty, and Colonel Long's brigade was posted above Minty, in the neighborhood of Washington, Tennessee. I desire to say nothing about why the rebels were permitted to cross, as the officer in command at the ford where the crossing was effected will have to answer for that he
September 29th (search for this): chapter 184
Colonel Miller's report. headquarters First brigade, Fourth division, Fourteenth army corps, Department of Cumberland, Brownsborough, Fla., Oct. 21, 1863. Lieutenant Moore, A. D. C. and A. A. A. G.: In pursuance of orders, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my command in the pursuit of the rebel forces under the command of Major-General Wheeler, in his recent raid through Tennessee and Northern Alabama. In compliance with orders received September twenty-ninth, I reported my command; the Seventy-second Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel S. C. Kirkpatrick commanding; the Seventeenth Indiana, Major Wm. Jones commanding; the Ninety-eighth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Kitchell commanding; the One Hundred and Twenty-third Illinois, Colonel James Monroe commanding; the Eighteenth Indiana battery, Captain Eli Lilly commanding; a battery of four mountain howitzers, Sergeant Edward commanding; and a detachment of pioneers, Captain Kilborn commanding, in t
September 30th (search for this): chapter 184
ieutenant-Colonel S. C. Kirkpatrick commanding; the Seventeenth Indiana, Major Wm. Jones commanding; the Ninety-eighth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Kitchell commanding; the One Hundred and Twenty-third Illinois, Colonel James Monroe commanding; the Eighteenth Indiana battery, Captain Eli Lilly commanding; a battery of four mountain howitzers, Sergeant Edward commanding; and a detachment of pioneers, Captain Kilborn commanding, in the vicinity of Blythe's Ferry, on the Tennessee River, September thirtieth. Here I received orders to leave my train, lead horses, three pieces of the Eighteenth Indiana battery, and three howitzers, and proceed with the remainder of the command to cross Waldon's Ridge into the Sequatchee Valley, which I did, reaching the valley, crossing it, and encamped on the Cumberland range on the night of the second of October. On the third I crossed the Cumberland Mountains in rear of Colonel Minty's cavalry brigade, who skirmished with the enemy through the day. La
October 1st (search for this): chapter 184
fore a military tribunal. On the morning of the thirtieth, the enemy crossed in force of four divisions — Wharton's, Martin's, Davidson's, and Armstrong's — the whole under command of Wheeler. When General Crook learned they were across, notwithstanding his precautions, he immediately ordered the regiments on duty above to move down the river and rejoin him, which they did, finding the General four miles below Smith's cross-roads, and about twelve below Washington. Next morning, October first, a reconnoissance to the cross-roads, by the Fourth Michigan, discovered the enemy ascending Waldron's Ridge. At two o'clock P. M., the Second brigade was ordered upon the ridge, on a parallel road. The brigade then consisted of the First Ohio, Second Kentucky, and the Chicago Board of Trade battery. The brigade camped that night on the ridge. The following morning, October second, the march was resumed, when the Second brigade was reenforced by the First, and Wilder's mounted infa
October 2nd (search for this): chapter 184
the Second brigade was ordered upon the ridge, on a parallel road. The brigade then consisted of the First Ohio, Second Kentucky, and the Chicago Board of Trade battery. The brigade camped that night on the ridge. The following morning, October second, the march was resumed, when the Second brigade was reenforced by the First, and Wilder's mounted infantry, as I said, commanded by Colonel Miller, and it was whispered that General Crook had received orders to pursue, overtake, and annihilat Indiana battery, and three howitzers, and proceed with the remainder of the command to cross Waldon's Ridge into the Sequatchee Valley, which I did, reaching the valley, crossing it, and encamped on the Cumberland range on the night of the second of October. On the third I crossed the Cumberland Mountains in rear of Colonel Minty's cavalry brigade, who skirmished with the enemy through the day. Late in the afternoon I was ordered to pass my command down the mountain to the front, and dislodge
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