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eet Captain Stone, at Gamalia, in Monroe county, Kentucky, which is near the State line. Captain G. B. Stone was ordered, with thirty men, to Jamestown, Monroe county, Kentucky, then to join Captain Roark at Gamalia; there Captain Roark was to take command of both companies, and proceed to Lafayette, Tennessee, and to return from there to this place — each company reporting to me as it returned. Lieutenant Kerigan was the first to return and report, which was done on the evening of the third instant. Captain Roark returned and reported on the evening of the fifth instant, reporting no rebels in the country; and that Captain Stone was in the country a short distance from town, and would be in that evening or early next morning. From these reports I telegraphed to General Boyle that my scouts had just returned and reported no rebels in the country. I should have said that Captain Stone returned on the evening of the fifth instant, but failed to report to me, and I was not apprised o
enant Kerigan was the first to return and report, which was done on the evening of the third instant. Captain Roark returned and reported on the evening of the fifth instant, reporting no rebels in the country; and that Captain Stone was in the country a short distance from town, and would be in that evening or early next morning. to General Boyle that my scouts had just returned and reported no rebels in the country. I should have said that Captain Stone returned on the evening of the fifth instant, but failed to report to me, and I was not apprised of his return until the sixth instant, when I saw him at Fort Hobson, near Glasgow, about twelve o'clock in the day. The town was attacked on the morning of the fifth instant, about daylight. I was in bed and heard the rebels passing through town, and in the direction of the fort, where my men were camped — I supposing as they passed through town that they were Captain Stone's men returning. I lay still until my father looked out the
eral Boyle that my scouts had just returned and reported no rebels in the country. I should have said that Captain Stone returned on the evening of the fifth instant, but failed to report to me, and I was not apprised of his return until the sixth instant, when I saw him at Fort Hobson, near Glasgow, about twelve o'clock in the day. The town was attacked on the morning of the fifth instant, about daylight. I was in bed and heard the rebels passing through town, and in the direction of the forn constant use ever since daylight the morning before; so we turned our course for Glasgow, reaching there on the morning of the eighth instant, with our recaptured prize. I will now give the particulars of the fight: On the morning of the sixth instant, when the town was attacked, the Provost-guards were all asleep, except those on duty at the guard-house, and the patrols about town. Captain George S. Nun was in command of the camp at the fort, and only a few of the men there were up. Some
ad travelled, and twelve rebels came upon them; but the pickets drove them back by firing on them.* We supposed the rebels were not far off, and had we had more men and fresh horses we would have followed after them, but our horses were rode down--Captain Beck having rode all the way from Munfordville via Cave City that day with his men, and my horses had been in constant use ever since daylight the morning before; so we turned our course for Glasgow, reaching there on the morning of the eighth instant, with our recaptured prize. I will now give the particulars of the fight: On the morning of the sixth instant, when the town was attacked, the Provost-guards were all asleep, except those on duty at the guard-house, and the patrols about town. Captain George S. Nun was in command of the camp at the fort, and only a few of the men there were up. Some were on guard in the fort when the rebels got in sight of it. They charged right into camp and up to the fort. The men inside the fort
on Glasgow, Ky., by the rebel Colonel John M. Hughse. On the evening of the thirtieth of last month, I was ordered by Brigadier-General J. T. Boyle to send scouts into the border counties of Kentucky, on the Kentucky and Tennessee State line, to learn if the enemy was there, and what he was doing, etc., etc. Previous to the reception of this order from General Boyle, I had ordered a scout of ninety men to go to the border, for the purpose which he desired, and on the morning of the ninth instant, I started the ninety men for that purpose. Lieutenant J. Kerigan was ordered to Cumberland county, Kentucky, with thirty men, with orders to go to Marrowbone Store, then to Centre Point and Tompkins', and from there to return to this place. Captain J. W. Roark, with thirty men, was ordered to Tompkinsville, with instructions to meet Captain Stone, at Gamalia, in Monroe county, Kentucky, which is near the State line. Captain G. B. Stone was ordered, with thirty men, to Jamestown, Monr
October 9th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 192
Doc. 189.-rebel raid on Glasgow, Ky. Report of Major Martin. headquarters United States forces, Glasgow, Ky., October 9, 1863. Brigadier-General E. H. Hobson, Munfordville, Kentucky: I now proceed to give you the particulars of the recent raid made on Glasgow, Ky., by the rebel Colonel John M. Hughse. On the evening of the thirtieth of last month, I was ordered by Brigadier-General J. T. Boyle to send scouts into the border counties of Kentucky, on the Kentucky and Tennessee State line, to learn if the enemy was there, and what he was doing, etc., etc. Previous to the reception of this order from General Boyle, I had ordered a scout of ninety men to go to the border, for the purpose which he desired, and on the morning of the ninth instant, I started the ninety men for that purpose. Lieutenant J. Kerigan was ordered to Cumberland county, Kentucky, with thirty men, with orders to go to Marrowbone Store, then to Centre Point and Tompkins', and from there to return to
bout twelve o'clock that day, and found the ebels all gone. Here I remained gathering up my men and the guns which had been scattered. I shipped a wagon-load of guns to Cave City that evening, and was reenforced about four o'clock. P. M., by Captain Beck, from Munfordville, with twentyfive men, mounted, he having come by Cave City. After giving time to feed his men and rest, we started with sixty men in pursuit of the enemy. Moving out on the Columbia road one mile, we crossed to the Burksviravelled, and twelve rebels came upon them; but the pickets drove them back by firing on them.* We supposed the rebels were not far off, and had we had more men and fresh horses we would have followed after them, but our horses were rode down--Captain Beck having rode all the way from Munfordville via Cave City that day with his men, and my horses had been in constant use ever since daylight the morning before; so we turned our course for Glasgow, reaching there on the morning of the eighth inst
J. T. Boyle (search for this): chapter 192
Ky., by the rebel Colonel John M. Hughse. On the evening of the thirtieth of last month, I was ordered by Brigadier-General J. T. Boyle to send scouts into the border counties of Kentucky, on the Kentucky and Tennessee State line, to learn if the enemy was there, and what he was doing, etc., etc. Previous to the reception of this order from General Boyle, I had ordered a scout of ninety men to go to the border, for the purpose which he desired, and on the morning of the ninth instant, I a short distance from town, and would be in that evening or early next morning. From these reports I telegraphed to General Boyle that my scouts had just returned and reported no rebels in the country. I should have said that Captain Stone returnen were captured. I then retreated five miles on the pike, and sent Lieutenant Chenoweth to Cave City to despatch to General Boyle, and return to where I was, which he did in a surprisingly short time. We left our post about eleven o'clock A. M.,
Nelson's men into line, under guard. I asked them whose command they belonged to. Receiving no reply, myself and Lieutenant Chenoweth fired on them, both about the same time; they returned the fire, some of their balls passing through the window int he was captured by them. Our fire from the windows was too severe, and the rebels left the square; then myself, Lieutenant Chenoweth, and William Griffith, (an orderly,) went down stairs to go to the stable to get our horses. When we got down staels sacking my camp and driving my men into line. I again lowered my gun to fire on them, but was prevailed on by Lieutenant Chenoweth not to do so. We were there helpless, only three of us with arms, and I considered the greater portion of my commato town, with a shout that told well that my men were captured. I then retreated five miles on the pike, and sent Lieutenant Chenoweth to Cave City to despatch to General Boyle, and return to where I was, which he did in a surprisingly short time.
Frank Clairborne (search for this): chapter 192
dressed myself, went to the window, and saw fifteen or twenty rebels ordering Captain Nelson's men into line, under guard. I asked them whose command they belonged to. Receiving no reply, myself and Lieutenant Chenoweth fired on them, both about the same time; they returned the fire, some of their balls passing through the window into our room. We fired six or eight times at them from the windows, wounding three or four rebels on the square. Here I will mention one of my orderlies, (Frank Clairborne.) We had shot a rebel off of his horse. I ordered Clairborne to go down and get on the horse and try to get to the fort and rally my men, then myself supposing that the rebels had not reached there. As quick as the order was given it was obeyed, and I saw him gallop off from the rebels in the square toward the fort, and I learn since that he was captured by them. Our fire from the windows was too severe, and the rebels left the square; then myself, Lieutenant Chenoweth, and William G
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