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Princeton, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 210
of colors, all his camp and garrison equipage, quartermaster and commissary stores, medical supplies, transportation, etc. The rebel authorities feeling ashamed and aggrieved at this, began to concentrate General Marmaduke's cavalry force at Princeton, forty-five miles from Pine Bluff, Friday, (October twenty-third), about noon, with about four thousand men and twelve pieces of artillery, mostly twelve-pound rifled guns, and started to take revenge on Colonel Clayton, who only had between five hundred and six hundred men, and nine pieces of light artillery. Sunday morning, about eight o'clock, Lieutenant Clark, of the Fifth Kansas cavalry, with one company, was sent out on the Princeton road, to see what he could discover, but did not go far before he met the enemy's advance, which fired on him at once. They did not skirmish but a few minutes before an armed party bearing a flag of truce came forward, and the officer commanding it said: I must go to the commanding officer immedia
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 210
hief of Staff. Chicago Tribune account. Pine Bluff, Arkansas, October 26, 1863. The attack that the authorities here have been expecting for some time has at last come, and the roar of cannon and the rattle of musketry have subsided, and the smoke from a hard-fought battle-field, or rather battle-town, has disappeared enough to enable us to see where we are and what we have accomplished. This place is situated on the south bank of the Arkansas River, about fifty miles from Little Rock, ninety from the Mississippi River, and sixty from Arkadelphia, (General Price's late headquarters.) It contained, before the war, some three thousand inhabitants, and was one of the finest and most business towns in Arkansas. For six or seven weeks it has been occupied by the Federals, during which time it has been garrisoned by the Fifth Kansas cavalry, and the First Indiana cavalry, under the command of Colonel Powell Clayton, of the Fifth Kansas cavalry. There is also here one compa
Tulip, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 210
as cavalry, and the First Indiana cavalry, under the command of Colonel Powell Clayton, of the Fifth Kansas cavalry. There is also here one company of State militia, which has been recruited since the Federals came here. About two weeks ago, Colonel Clayton took three hundred and fifty men and four pieces of light artillery, and by making a circuitous route, and marching ninety miles in thirty-three hours, succeeded in surprising and completely routing Colonel Dobbin's cavalry brigade at Tulip, capturing one stand of colors, all his camp and garrison equipage, quartermaster and commissary stores, medical supplies, transportation, etc. The rebel authorities feeling ashamed and aggrieved at this, began to concentrate General Marmaduke's cavalry force at Princeton, forty-five miles from Pine Bluff, Friday, (October twenty-third), about noon, with about four thousand men and twelve pieces of artillery, mostly twelve-pound rifled guns, and started to take revenge on Colonel Clayton,
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 210
une account. Pine Bluff, Arkansas, October 26, 1863. The attack that the authorities here have been expecting for some time has at last come, and the roar of cannon and the rattle of musketry have subsided, and the smoke from a hard-fought battle-field, or rather battle-town, has disappeared enough to enable us to see where we are and what we have accomplished. This place is situated on the south bank of the Arkansas River, about fifty miles from Little Rock, ninety from the Mississippi River, and sixty from Arkadelphia, (General Price's late headquarters.) It contained, before the war, some three thousand inhabitants, and was one of the finest and most business towns in Arkansas. For six or seven weeks it has been occupied by the Federals, during which time it has been garrisoned by the Fifth Kansas cavalry, and the First Indiana cavalry, under the command of Colonel Powell Clayton, of the Fifth Kansas cavalry. There is also here one company of State militia, which has b
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 210
etry have subsided, and the smoke from a hard-fought battle-field, or rather battle-town, has disappeared enough to enable us to see where we are and what we have accomplished. This place is situated on the south bank of the Arkansas River, about fifty miles from Little Rock, ninety from the Mississippi River, and sixty from Arkadelphia, (General Price's late headquarters.) It contained, before the war, some three thousand inhabitants, and was one of the finest and most business towns in Arkansas. For six or seven weeks it has been occupied by the Federals, during which time it has been garrisoned by the Fifth Kansas cavalry, and the First Indiana cavalry, under the command of Colonel Powell Clayton, of the Fifth Kansas cavalry. There is also here one company of State militia, which has been recruited since the Federals came here. About two weeks ago, Colonel Clayton took three hundred and fifty men and four pieces of light artillery, and by making a circuitous route, and march
Arkadelphia (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 210
rkansas, October 26, 1863. The attack that the authorities here have been expecting for some time has at last come, and the roar of cannon and the rattle of musketry have subsided, and the smoke from a hard-fought battle-field, or rather battle-town, has disappeared enough to enable us to see where we are and what we have accomplished. This place is situated on the south bank of the Arkansas River, about fifty miles from Little Rock, ninety from the Mississippi River, and sixty from Arkadelphia, (General Price's late headquarters.) It contained, before the war, some three thousand inhabitants, and was one of the finest and most business towns in Arkansas. For six or seven weeks it has been occupied by the Federals, during which time it has been garrisoned by the Fifth Kansas cavalry, and the First Indiana cavalry, under the command of Colonel Powell Clayton, of the Fifth Kansas cavalry. There is also here one company of State militia, which has been recruited since the Federal
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 210
-General. F. H. Manter, Colonel and Chief of Staff. Chicago Tribune account. Pine Bluff, Arkansas, October 26, 1863. The attack that the authorities here have been expecting for some time has at last come, and the roar of cannon and the rattle of musketry have subsided, and the smoke from a hard-fought battle-field, or rather battle-town, has disappeared enough to enable us to see where we are and what we have accomplished. This place is situated on the south bank of the Arkansas River, about fifty miles from Little Rock, ninety from the Mississippi River, and sixty from Arkadelphia, (General Price's late headquarters.) It contained, before the war, some three thousand inhabitants, and was one of the finest and most business towns in Arkansas. For six or seven weeks it has been occupied by the Federals, during which time it has been garrisoned by the Fifth Kansas cavalry, and the First Indiana cavalry, under the command of Colonel Powell Clayton, of the Fifth Kansas c
Pine Bluff (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 210
Doc. 207.-battle of Pine Bluff, Ark. Official report of Colonel Clayton. headquarters army of Arkansas, little Roclose Colonel Clayton's report of his gallant defence of Pine Bluff, also Lieutenant-Colonel Caldwell's report of his pursuiA. G., Department of the Missouri. headquarters post of Pine Bluff, Pine Bluff, Oct. 27, 1863. General: I respectfully sPine Bluff, Oct. 27, 1863. General: I respectfully submit. to you the following report of the battle fought at this place October twenty-fifth, between General Marmaduke's forumbering less than six hundred men, was attacked at Pine Bluff, Arkansas, by an army of rebels, twenty-five hundred in numbenest thanks, for their gallant conduct in the defence of Pine Bluff; and they can rest well assured that their gallantry des Chief of Staff. Chicago Tribune account. Pine Bluff, Arkansas, October 26, 1863. The attack that the authoritiduke's cavalry force at Princeton, forty-five miles from Pine Bluff, Friday, (October twenty-third), about noon, with about
Canuck (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 210
Doc. 207.-battle of Pine Bluff, Ark. Official report of Colonel Clayton. headquarters army of Arkansas, little Rock, Ark., Nov. 8, 1863. Major: I have the honor to inclose Colonel Clayton's report of his gallant defence of Pine Bluff, also Lieutenant-Colonel Caldwell's report of his pursuit of Marmaduke. Caldwell captured more property than fell into the possession of Marmaduke during his raid. Very respectfully, Major, Your obedient servant, Frederick Steele, Major-Generalrefor. I am, General, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Powell Clayton, Colonel Commanding. Major-General Steele, Commanding Army of Arkansas. Congratulatory order of General Steele. headquarters army of Arkansas, little Rock, Ark., Nov. 7, 1863. General orders, no. 41: It is fit that the conduct of troops on the battle-field, especially gallant and heroic, should be publicly approbated by the commanding officer, and officially published for the emulation of the who
Princeton, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 210
bedient servant, Frederick Steele, Major-General Commanding. Major O. D. Green, A. A. G., Department of the Missouri. headquarters post of Pine Bluff, Pine Bluff, Oct. 27, 1863. General: I respectfully submit. to you the following report of the battle fought at this place October twenty-fifth, between General Marmaduke's forces and the garrison at this post. About eight o'clock in the morning, I sent Lieutenant Clark, Fifth Kansas cavalry, with one company, out in the direction of Princetown. He did not go far before he met the enemy advancing in force. The enemy's skirmishers fired on him at once, but soon after an armed party, bearing a flag of truce, came forward, and the officer in command of this party insisted that he should be allowed to pass in immediately. Lieutenant Clark told him it was no way to first fire on him, and then insist on going in with a flag of truce. But he would give him half an hour for him (Clark) to send in to headquarters and get an answer. H
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