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oad, and went south. Is there a braver man living than the General? My loss is nine killed and sixteen wounded, (six of company C, Third Wisconsin cavalry,) Lieutenant Cook, of the Second colored, and John Fry, the express-rider, and one negro. As near as I can learn, the casualties of General Blunt are about eighty killed and s, Third Wisconsin cavalry, and Sergeant R. W. Smith, of said company. The number of the killed is as follows: Major N. Z. Curtis, Lieutenant A. W. Farr, Lieutenant Cook,3 Members of the brigade band,14 Clerks and orderlies,6 Company A, Fourteenth Kansas,18 Company I, Third Wisconsin cavalry,23 Company C, Third Wisconsin f counties in Missouri, and made a detour to attack the camp at Baxter's Springs, which up to that time had been defended by one company of colored men, under Lieutenant Cook, and a fragment of company D of the Third Wisconsin cavalry only. Fortunately, however, on the day before, I had sent Lieutenant James B. Pond, with part of
Josiah G. Cavart (search for this): chapter 217
d also an escort, consisting of forty men of company I, Third Wisconsin cavalry, under Lieutenant H. D. Banister, forty-five men of company A, Fourteenth Kansas cavalry, under Lieuteuant Pierce, and the whole escort, under the command of Lieutenant J. G. Cavart, Third Wisconsin cavalry, and a train of eight wagons, transporting the effects of district headquarters, company effects, etc., left Fort Scott, for Fort Smith, Ark., and on that day marched six miles and camped. On the succeeding day d Lieutenant A. W. Farr, Third Wisconsin cavalry, Judge-Advocate; his clerks and orderlies, the brigade band, and parts of two companies of cavalry, respectively under the command of Lieutenants Robert Pierce, Fourteenth Kansas, cavalry, and Josiah G. Cavart, Third Wisconsin cavalry, left this place for Fort Blunt, Cherokee Nation. About four o'clock on the morning of the seventh instant, Lieutenant Tappin returned, informing me that about one o'clock the day previous, General Blunt had been at
C. W. Blair (search for this): chapter 217
nt Cook,3 Members of the brigade band,14 Clerks and orderlies,6 Company A, Fourteenth Kansas,18 Company I, Third Wisconsin cavalry,23 Company C, Third Wisconsin cavalry (in camp) 6 Citizens,10 80 Wounded,18 Total,98 The loss of the enemy, as far as known, is between twenty and thirty. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, B. S. Henning, Major Third Wisconsin Cavalry. to Colonel O. D. Green, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of Missouri, St. Louis. Lieutenant-Colonel Blair's report. headquarters Fort Scott, Kansas, October 15, 1863. sir: I have the honor to report to you, for the information of the Major-General Commanding, the following particulars, as far as they came to my knowledge, or under my observation, of the late disaster at Baxter's Springs. On the fourth instant Major-General Blunt, his staff, consisting of Major B. S. Henning, Third Wisconsin cavalry, Provost-Marshal; Major H. Z. Curtis, Assistant Adjutant-General; Lieutenant J
H. Z. Curtis (search for this): chapter 217
d twelve privates and the Adjutant-General (Major Curtis) prisoners, and that I had killed and woundat I had done, as they had already murdered Major Curtis and our prisoners. This evening, General B following members of his staff, namely, Major H. Z. Curtis, Assistant Adjutant-General, Major B. S. on the prairie in search of General Blunt, Major Curtis, or any other I could find, and in about anmarched south in a body. General Blunt and Major Curtis had tried to stop the flight of our troops untry. Major H. Z. Curtis was a son of Major-General Curtis, and served with his father during his eneral Blunt determining to take the field, Major Curtis accompanied him with alacrity, parting withs, on Tuesday, sixth October. All who knew Major Curtis, acknowledged his superior abilities, and ihird Wisconsin cavalry, Provost-Marshal; Major H. Z. Curtis, Assistant Adjutant-General; Lieutenant nt intention was to kill all. The bodies of Major Curtis and Lieutenant Farr were not found until th[10 more...]
B. S. Henning (search for this): chapter 217
hich, was then out; but on looking around, I discovered Major Henning, of our regiment, who had gallantly cut his way throughColonel C. W. Blair,. Commanding Post, Fort Scott. Major Henning's report. Baxter's Springs, Cherokee nation, Oct. ely, Major H. Z. Curtis, Assistant Adjutant-General, Major B. S. Henning, Provost-Marshal of District, Lieutenant Tappin, Secd thirty. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, B. S. Henning, Major Third Wisconsin Cavalry. to Colonel O. D. Greennstant Major-General Blunt, his staff, consisting of Major B. S. Henning, Third Wisconsin cavalry, Provost-Marshal; Major H. He was further under the impression that Majors Curtis and Henning, and Lieutenant Farr, were prisoners. Within an hour I accordingly turned with his staff-officers, all except Major Henning, to endeavor to overtake the fugitives. By this time ta miracle. At this time too, it seems to have struck Major Henning that the enemy approached from an angle which might mis
ted, that as the enemy came over the brow of the hill, just from the direction of Pond's camp, it seemed without a doubt, that his little force had been captured, and destroyed also. He was further under the impression that Majors Curtis and Henning, and Lieutenant Farr, were prisoners. Within an hour I was en route to the General's relief, with three companies of the Twelfth Kansas infantry, two companies of the Second Kansas colored infantry, and about one hundred cavalry, under Lieutenants Josling and Clark. Twenty miles out, I met a despatch from General Blunt, that he was safe with Lieutenant Pond, who had been fortunate enough to repulse the enemy in their attack on his camp. I pushed on, however, without relaxation, and arrived at the Springs, a distance of seventy miles, in the afternoon of the second day, although it was the first heavy marching the infantry had ever attempted. On my arrival I found that the General had sent off every mounted man he could find, either a
Jesse Smith (search for this): chapter 217
der and deliver up their arms, they should be treated as prisoners of war, and upon doing so, were immediately shot down. Sergeant Jack Splane, company I, Third Wisconsin cavalry, was treated in this way, and the fiend who shot him, after taking his arms, said: Tell old God, that the last man you saw on earth, was Quantrell. Sergeant Splane is now alive, although he received five balls, one in his head, one through his chest, one through his bowels, and the other in his leg and arm. Private Jesse Smith was shot nearly as bad, and under the same circumstances; but he did not lose his consciousness, and says, that the rebel who shot him, and as he lay upon his face, jumped upon his back, and essayed to dance, uttering the most vile imprecations. Some unarmed citizens who were with us, were killed, and their bodies stripped of clothing. Take it all in all, there has perhaps not a more horrible affair (except the massacre at Lawrence, in Kansas) happened during the war, and brands the
R. McKenzie (search for this): chapter 217
Polloque, and the entire brigade band. Here allow me to make mention of some of the noble acts of some of my men. Sergeant McKenzie, of my company, exchanged eleven shots with a rebel officer, and succeeded in killing his horse. The man then dismounted and took to the timber; McKenzie followed him, and with but one shot in his revolver killed his man while his adversary was firing at him. Sergeant Smith, I think, was the coolest man on the ground, and did not fail to see that every order waspremeditatedly and not by random shots, and the brute who shot the child, was killed by a shot from the revolver of Sergeant McKenzie, company C, Third Wisconsin cavalry. I respectfully call your attention to the facts set forth in this report, in of the bravery and coolness of Lieutenant James B. Pond, company C, Third Wisconsin cavalry, commanding the camp, Sergeant R. McKenzie, of company C, Third Wisconsin cavalry, and Sergeant R. W. Smith, of said company. The number of the killed is
James B. Pond (search for this): chapter 217
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, James B. Pond, First Lieut. Co. c, Third Wis. Cav., Comm established a few days, and in that time Lieutenant Pond caused to be built a breastwork like a lo Blunt had been out of sight of the camp, Lieutenant Pond had been unable to tell what it meant, anindecently treated. Being satisfied that Lieutenant Pond could hold the camp against their force, notice of the bravery and coolness of Lieutenant James B. Pond, company C, Third Wisconsin cavalry, owever, on the day before, I had sent Lieutenant James B. Pond, with part of another company of the before the word could be given to charge, Lieutenant Pond opened upon them with the little howitzerd, the General of course, supposed it was Lieutenant Pond's cavalry, either on drill, or coming outd to strike for the camp, and endeavor to bring Pond's forces to the assistance of the General. Accful and combined attack would have been made on Pond's camp, and with the force around it, must fina[12 more...]
Stephen Wheeler (search for this): chapter 217
ggling fire therefrom, I immediately commenced to fire upon these stragglers, and received their fire in return, and was seconded in this by Captain Tough and Stephen Wheeler, of company F, Third Wisconsin cavalry, both of whom acted with great bravery, and was just on the point of returning to our line, when I saw five mounted men, Third Wisconsin cavalry, one of the companies stationed at the Springs, (and belonging to my own regiment.) I determined to rescue them, and called to Tough and Wheeler to advance with me, but the former had just shot one rebel and was in close pursuit of another, in a direction taking him away from me. Wheeler advanced with me, Wheeler advanced with me, and by pressing hard on the rebels and firing fast, we drove them, killing one, wounding another, and rescuing the prisoners, who all belonged to company C, Third Wisconsin cavalry. As the rebels escaped, they attempted to shoot their prisoners, and wounded one in the shoulder. As this was right under the fire of the camp, two of
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