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own the valley from there. The main body, however, was divided into plundering parties, and scoured the whole southern portion of the county, spending several days in and about Greencastle and Waynesboro, and giving Welsh Run a pretty intimate visitation. The rebels seemed omnipresent according to reports. They were on several occasions since their departure from this place just about to reenter it, and the panic-stricken made .a corresponding exit at the other side. On Thursday, the eighteenth, they were reported within two miles of here, in large force, and a general skedaddle took place. And again on Sunday, the twenty-first, they were reported coming with reenforcements. A few ran off, but most of our people, knowing that there was a military force to fall back upon between this and Scotland, shouldered their guns and fell into ranks to give battle. Prominent among these we noticed Rev. Mr. Niccoll, whose people missed a sermon in.his determination to pop a few rebels.
about to reenter it, and the panic-stricken made .a corresponding exit at the other side. On Thursday, the eighteenth, they were reported within two miles of here, in large force, and a general skedaddle took place. And again on Sunday, the twenty-first, they were reported coming with reenforcements. A few ran off, but most of our people, knowing that there was a military force to fall back upon between this and Scotland, shouldered their guns and fell into ranks to give battle. Prominent a burn it. The warehouse of Mr. Criswell and several cars were spared upon satisfactory assurance that they were private property. As soon as the rebels fell back the railroad company commenced to rebuild the bridge, and on Sunday evening, the twenty-first, trains passed over it again. The only other instance of firing property that has reached us was the warehouse of Oaks and Linn. It was fired just as they left the town, but the citizens extinguished it. We had not the felicity of a perso
generally did their duty, but they were required in their respective neighborhoods to picket and protect, in some degree, their stock. A concentration of our men at Chambersburgh, or Greencastle, or Mercersburgh would have left twenty-five thousand people with their property entirely defenceless. In the valley the citizens were under arms, and had the roads barricaded for defence, but the southern portion of the county is open and unsuited to defence by small parties. On Sunday, the twenty-eighth, the Eighth New-York militia arrived here, having marched from Shippensburgh, and they were received with the wildest enthusiasm. Considering that they are on our border in advance of any Pennsylvania regiments, they merit, as they will receive, the lasting gratitude of every man in the border. The old men of the town organized a company, headed by Hon. George Chambers, for the defence of the town. None were admitted under forty-five. On Monday every man capable of bearing arms had
Doc. 33.-Jenkins's raid into Pennsylvania. Chambersburgh Repository account. on Sunday evening, June fourteenth, the dark clouds of contrabands commenced rushing upon us, bringing the tidings that General Milroy's forces at Martinsburgh had been attacked and scattered, and that the rebels, under General Rhodes, were advancing upon Pennsylvania. With due allowance for the excessive alarm of the slaves, it was manifest that the rebels were about to clear out the Shenandoah valley, and, that once done, the Cumberland, with all its teeming wealth, would be at rebel mercy. On Sunday night our people were much excited, and the question of protection became one of paramount interest. To inquiries, the authorities at Washington answered that the aspect of the war just at present rendered it unwise to divide or weaken the army of the Potomac, and that Pennsylvania must furnish her own men for her defence. A call from the President was issued to that effect, which is noticed elsewh
n. No fences were wantonly destroyed, poultry was not disturbed, nor did he compliment our blooded cattle so much as to test the quality of their steak and roasts. Some of his men cast a wistful eye upon the glistening trout in the spring; but they were protected by voluntary order, and save a few quarts of delicious strawberries, gathered with every care, after first asking permission, nothing in the gardens or about the grounds was taken. Having had a taste of rebel love for horses last October, when General Stuart's officers first stole our horses, and then supped and smoked socially with us, we had started to the mountains slightly in advance of Jenkins's occupation of the town, and, being unable to find them, we are happy to say that General Jenkins didn't steal our new assortment. However earnest an enemy Jenkins may be, he don't seem to keep spite, but is capable of being very jolly and sociable when he is treated hospitably. For prudential reasons the editor was not at h
home to do the honors at his own table; but Jenkins was not particular, nor was his appetite impaired thereby. He called upon the ladies of the house, shared their hospitality, behaved in all respects like a gentleman, and expressed very earnest regrets that he had not been able to make the personal acquaintance of the editor. We beg to say that we reciprocate the wish of the General, and shall be glad to make his acquaintance personally--when this cruel war is over. Colonel French and Surgeon Bee spent much of their time with Mrs. McClure, and the former showed his appreciation of her hospitality by taking her revolver from her when he left. An order having been made for the citizens to surrender all the guns and pistols they had, Colonel French took the pistol of his hostess. How many rifles he didn't get that were in her keeping, we dinna choose to tell. Horses seemed to be considered contraband of war, and were taken without the pretence of compensation; but other articles
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 35
ntly confounded Major Rowe with his son, the gallant Lieutenant-Colonel Rowe, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth.) Jenkins then asked Mr.----whom he had voted for at the last Presidential election. He answered that he had voted for Lincoln. To which Jenkins gave the following chaste and classic reply: Get off that horse, you — abolitionist. The horse was surrendered, and the same question was propounded to Major Rowe, who answered that he had voted for Douglas, and had scratched every Breckinridge man off his ticket. Jenkins answered: You can ride your horse as long as you like — I voted for Douglas myself. He then demanded to know what forces were in Greencastle, and what fortifications. Major Rowe told him that the town was defenseless; but Jenkins seemed to be cautious lest he might be caught in a trap. He advanced cautiously, reconnoitred all suspicious buildings, and finally being fully satisfied that there was not a gun in position, and not a man under arms, he resolved u
George Chambers (search for this): chapter 35
ective neighborhoods to picket and protect, in some degree, their stock. A concentration of our men at Chambersburgh, or Greencastle, or Mercersburgh would have left twenty-five thousand people with their property entirely defenceless. In the valley the citizens were under arms, and had the roads barricaded for defence, but the southern portion of the county is open and unsuited to defence by small parties. On Sunday, the twenty-eighth, the Eighth New-York militia arrived here, having marched from Shippensburgh, and they were received with the wildest enthusiasm. Considering that they are on our border in advance of any Pennsylvania regiments, they merit, as they will receive, the lasting gratitude of every man in the border. The old men of the town organized a company, headed by Hon. George Chambers, for the defence of the town. None were admitted under forty-five. On Monday every man capable of bearing arms had his gun, and was in some organization to resist the rebels.
y-first, they were reported coming with reenforcements. A few ran off, but most of our people, knowing that there was a military force to fall back upon between this and Scotland, shouldered their guns and fell into ranks to give battle. Prominent among these we noticed Rev. Mr. Niccoll, whose people missed a sermon in.his determination to pop a few rebels. One of the first acts done by the rebels here was to march down to the railroad bridge at Scotland and burn it. The warehouse of Mr. Criswell and several cars were spared upon satisfactory assurance that they were private property. As soon as the rebels fell back the railroad company commenced to rebuild the bridge, and on Sunday evening, the twenty-first, trains passed over it again. The only other instance of firing property that has reached us was the warehouse of Oaks and Linn. It was fired just as they left the town, but the citizens extinguished it. We had not the felicity of a personal interview with the distinguis
at Harrisburgh, were each momentarily expecting to be cut to pieces by the other. But these armies, alike terrible in their heroism, were spared the deadly clash of arms, inasmuch as even the most improved ordnance is not deemed fatal at a range of fifty miles. Both armies, as the usual reports go, having accomplished their purpose retired in good order. As a rule, we believe that private houses were not sacked by Jenkins's forces; but there were some exceptions. The residences of Messrs. Dengler and Gipe, near Chambersburgh, were both entered (the familes being absent) and plundered of clothing, kettles, and other articles. Bureaus and cupboards were all emptied of their contents, and such articles as they wanted were taken. We have not learned of any instances of the kind in town. A very few of our citizens exhibited the craven spirit of the genuine copperhead, but Jenkins and his men, in no instance, treated them with even courtesy. That they made use of some such creat
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