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Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
et recorded. The Richmond Examiner of the twenty-seventh November, 1863, has the following in its leading editorial upon Lieutenant-General Longstreet and his Knoxville and Suffolk campaigns, which are pronounced as parallel failures: Perhaps the result might have been different if Longstreet and his corps of the Virginia the public justly based on the first intelligence briskly forwarded by General Bragg. His telegram declared that Longstreet's cavalry had pursued the enemy into Knoxville; that the infantry was close up, and it was natural to suppose that the next news would be that of Knoxville's recapture. But the next news from Longstreet contKnoxville's recapture. But the next news from Longstreet contained a mention of intrenching, which suggested disagreeable reminiscences of Suffolk. Since then, little or nothing has been heard from Longstreet, unless we are to receive the unofficial story of the telegraph this morning to be trustworthy. Oh! that it may be so! His pressure on Burnside has, undoubtedly, quickened Grant's at
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
cross the Nansemond, a narrow and crooked stream, and overwhelm the garrison, or at least seize the roads to Norfolk and cut off the supplies. In either event there would have been no earthly obstacle to his marching unchecked into Norfolk and Portsmouth, as two small and raw regiments alone constituted the garrison of those places. His designs were. brought to naught by the watchfulness and skill of the Federal commander, and the obstinate resistance of the Federal troops when conscious of tay the true history of the Suffolk campaign should be made public. Suffolk lies at the head of the Nansemond, twelve miles from its confluence with the James. Two railroads unite at this town, one from Norfolk to Petersburgh, the other from Portsmouth to Weldon, etc., N. C. By means of them General Peck's supplies were forwarded from Norfolk, a distance of twenty miles, and on the other hand the rebel stores and reenforcements were forwarded from the opposite extremities almost to the very l
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
Suffolk, Va. April and May, 1863. the siege of Suffolk was raised on the third of May, 1863, almost simultaneously with the mortifying disaster at Chancellorsville. The latter event in its absorbing influence upon the public mind drew away all thought from the minor operations about Suffolk, and in the absence of anys the second of May, Lieutenant-General Hill confronted Suffolk with some thirty thousand men, Longtreet having gone by rail with one division, to aid Lee at Chancellorsville. Of this fact, the writer who has every facility for information, speaks without fear of truthful contradiction. On the same day Hooker and Lee fought theiom the confederate line at the time of Sherman's arrival in the Federal host has given the enemy a great opportunity. It was during the parallel campaign of Longstreet against Suffolk that Hooker made his coup at Chancellorsville; but he found there Jackson, while Grant had to do with Bragg alone. Honor to whom honor is due!
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
, bridges, and timber-cutting, must be seen to be appreciated. Nevertheless, these troops exhibited to the last no other feeling than that of the most praiseworthy patience, courage, and devotion to duty. Every able-bodied man in this division was employed every day, and not unfrequently at night either on picket or fatigue duty. Repeatedly also, the pickets themselves were compelled to handle the pick and shovel. An amusing incident is related in this connection. A soldier in a New-Hampshire regiment, while wearily digging during the small hours of the morning, was heard to remark to his neighbor: I say, Bill! I hope Old Peck will die two weeks before I do. Why so? queried his friend. Because he'll have hell so strongly fortified that I can't get in, was the irreverent reply. An inspection of the defences of the Nansemond at the close of the siege, would have convinced an observer that if the river Styx is ever made equally difficult to cross, the soldier's remark
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
for ever, despite his previously long and honorable career. But in him the rebel general found an adversary whose watchfulness was more than a match for his own skill and daring. Justice to General Peck requires that even at this late day the true history of the Suffolk campaign should be made public. Suffolk lies at the head of the Nansemond, twelve miles from its confluence with the James. Two railroads unite at this town, one from Norfolk to Petersburgh, the other from Portsmouth to Weldon, etc., N. C. By means of them General Peck's supplies were forwarded from Norfolk, a distance of twenty miles, and on the other hand the rebel stores and reenforcements were forwarded from the opposite extremities almost to the very lines of investment. The objects of Longstreet's attack were important and manifold. By crossing the narrow Nansemond and occupying the railroads in rear, the city would fall an easy prey together with its thirteen thousand defenders, its vast commissary, qua
Washington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
ron. Thence the occupation of Norfolk would be but a holiday march. It is also assumed that the ├ęclat attaching to the name of a General who should accomplish these objects, may have had some influence on a mind notoriously eager for military renown. To crown his undertaking with success three preliminary movements were carefully planned and put into execution. 1st. The Suffolk garrison must be weakened. To accomplish this, Hill was sent with a considerable force to attack Little Washington, N. C., whence he could in three or four days rejoin the main army in Virginia. 2d. Pontoon and siege trains were collected at proper points and held in readiness for an instant move. 3d. The troops were also conveniently stationed in such manner that they might be literally precipitated upon the doomed town, sixteen thousand being posted on the Blackwater, the remainder along the railway to Petersburgh. As was anticipated, Hill's movement resulted in an order directing General Pe
Sommerton (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
ted in front, and every measure which the resources of skilful engineering could devise were adopted to resist the terrible artillery fire of our batteries, and to foil sorties should any be made. General Peck, continually vigilant to observe any change in the location, strength, or plans of the enemy, repeatedly sent out columns of moderate strength to attack the enemy. A reconnoissance, made on the twenty-fourth, by General Corcoran on the Edenton, and another by Colonel Foster on the Somerton road resulted in lively skirmishes, in which the enemy's outposts were driven back to their main lines, before whose formidable strength our weak columns were in turn compelled to retire. General Peck had divided his entire circle of defence (including the Nansemond) into sections of convenient length, to the direct responsibility of which he assigned his principal subordinates. That of General Getty, which was by far the longest and weakest, was subsequently subdivided into the line of
Hill's Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
inually baffled by the resistless gunnery of our land batteries and the gunboats. On the eighteenth of April, however, it seemed that their object was finally accomplished. An earth-work, mounting five heavy rifled guns, was established at Hill's Point, about six miles from Suffolk, and of such strong profile and skilful construction that our missiles could only bury themselves harmlessly in the parapet, while from their protected position they maintained a destructive fight with the gunboats. The Mount Washington, already disabled in an unequal contest with a battery higher up, grounded off Hill's Point, directly under the rebel guns. Her companions refused to leave her in this emergency, and then for six long hours raged one of the most desperate and unequal contests of the war. The gallant Lamson, on his crippled-vessel, and the equally gallant Cushing, stood over their smoking guns and bleeding gunners till the rising tide at last floated them off in safety. The Commodore Ba
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
. April and May, 1863. the siege of Suffolk was raised on the third of May, 1863, almost y all thought from the minor operations about Suffolk, and in the absence of any apparent importanthe Suffolk campaign should be made public. Suffolk lies at the head of the Nansemond, twelve mil planned and put into execution. 1st. The Suffolk garrison must be weakened. To accomplish thiblished at Hill's Point, about six miles from Suffolk, and of such strong profile and skilful constnd of May, Lieutenant-General Hill confronted Suffolk with some thirty thousand men, Longtreet haviould delay if not prevent reenforcements from Suffolk. The returns of the army of the Potomac for nant-General Longstreet and his Knoxville and Suffolk campaigns, which are pronounced as parallel fwhich suggested disagreeable reminiscences of Suffolk. Since then, little or nothing has been hearg the parallel campaign of Longstreet against Suffolk that Hooker made his coup at Chancellorsville[3 more...]
Wilderness, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 66
able quantity of small arms and stores. The writer cannot relinquish his theme without allusion to contemporary events. As late as the second of May, Lieutenant-General Hill confronted Suffolk with some thirty thousand men, Longtreet having gone by rail with one division, to aid Lee at Chancellorsville. Of this fact, the writer who has every facility for information, speaks without fear of truthful contradiction. On the same day Hooker and Lee fought their desperate engagement in the Wilderness. Lee's army, thus depleted by Longstreet's diversion, numbered not far from fifty thousand, and Hooker knew that General Stoneman's operations would delay if not prevent reenforcements from Suffolk. The returns of the army of the Potomac for that date exhibit about one hundred and twenty-five thousand men present for duty, yet notwithstanding this disparity in numbers, our magnificent army, the boast of the North, was ignominiously defeated, despite the high-sounding proclamation that he
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