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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
ack near Rockville, Md. Washington, D. C., June 29, 1863. Yesterday morning, at about half-past 9 o'clock, I started from Washington in company with three officers of the topographical engineers. It was our intention to ride through to Frederick, stopping at Rockville for the purpose of taking dinner, but we all knew the liability of well-laid schemes, whether bi or quadrupedal, to go wrong. By the time we reached our first post of cavalry pickets we came up with the rear of a long wawhose time is just up, to act as mounted infantry, provided they would consent to serve in that capacity for a few weeks. The Scott's Nine Hundred (cavalry) marched through town at two o'clock this morning, and the Sixteenth New-York leave for Frederick at three P. M. It is Colonel Wyndham's intention to see if he cannot fall foul of these rebel gentlemen and recover our mules, and take a few hundred prisoners at the same time. The appointment of Colonel Wyndham gives great satisfaction. No
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 85
Doc. 83.-rebel attack near Rockville, Md. Washington, D. C., June 29, 1863. Yesterday morning, at about half-past 9 o'clock, I started from Washington in company with three officers of the topographical engineers. It was our intention to ride through to Frederick, stopping at Rockville for the purpose of taking dinner, Washington in company with three officers of the topographical engineers. It was our intention to ride through to Frederick, stopping at Rockville for the purpose of taking dinner, but we all knew the liability of well-laid schemes, whether bi or quadrupedal, to go wrong. By the time we reached our first post of cavalry pickets we came up with the rear of a long wagon train, comprising one hundred and fifty vehicles, each drawn by six mules, driven by a very black and picturesque negro. This train must havsh of the enemy caused considerable excitement in the city directly we arrived. Colonel Wyndham was immediately put in command of all the cavalry in and around Washington, with authority to mount and organize all the horseless troopers he could lay his hands on, and to mount a Maine regiment whose time is just up, to act as mount
Rockville, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 85
Doc. 83.-rebel attack near Rockville, Md. Washington, D. C., June 29, 1863. Yesterday morning, at about half-past 9 o'clock, I started from Washington in company with three officers of the topographical engineers. It was our intention to ride through to Frederick, stopping at Rockville for the purpose of taking dinner, but we all knew the liability of well-laid schemes, whether bi or quadrupedal, to go wrong. By the time we reached our first post of cavalry pickets we came up with t least two miles long, for by the time we had reached the other end, riding leisurely, we were within a mile or two of Rockville. Here, just as we had passed the. last wagon, an excited horseman, coming from the direction of Rockville, halted our Rockville, halted our party, and in a somewhat con. fused voice gave us the pleasing intelligence that about four hundred rebel cavalry were close at his heels. A short consultation of war resulted in our making up our minds to retreat. This conclusion was scarcely arr
Sir Percy Wyndham (search for this): chapter 85
x hours ride of nearly thirty miles, very sore and very tired. This bold dash of the enemy caused considerable excitement in the city directly we arrived. Colonel Wyndham was immediately put in command of all the cavalry in and around Washington, with authority to mount and organize all the horseless troopers he could lay his heks. The Scott's Nine Hundred (cavalry) marched through town at two o'clock this morning, and the Sixteenth New-York leave for Frederick at three P. M. It is Colonel Wyndham's intention to see if he cannot fall foul of these rebel gentlemen and recover our mules, and take a few hundred prisoners at the same time. The appointment hree P. M. It is Colonel Wyndham's intention to see if he cannot fall foul of these rebel gentlemen and recover our mules, and take a few hundred prisoners at the same time. The appointment of Colonel Wyndham gives great satisfaction. No officer in the army has a higher reputation for energy, activity, and soldierly knowledge.
Doc. 83.-rebel attack near Rockville, Md. Washington, D. C., June 29, 1863. Yesterday morning, at about half-past 9 o'clock, I started from Washington in company with three officers of the topographical engineers. It was our intention to ride through to Frederick, stopping at Rockville for the purpose of taking dinner, but we all knew the liability of well-laid schemes, whether bi or quadrupedal, to go wrong. By the time we reached our first post of cavalry pickets we came up with the rear of a long wagon train, comprising one hundred and fifty vehicles, each drawn by six mules, driven by a very black and picturesque negro. This train must have been at least two miles long, for by the time we had reached the other end, riding leisurely, we were within a mile or two of Rockville. Here, just as we had passed the. last wagon, an excited horseman, coming from the direction of Rockville, halted our party, and in a somewhat con. fused voice gave us the pleasing intelligence t
June 29th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 85
Doc. 83.-rebel attack near Rockville, Md. Washington, D. C., June 29, 1863. Yesterday morning, at about half-past 9 o'clock, I started from Washington in company with three officers of the topographical engineers. It was our intention to ride through to Frederick, stopping at Rockville for the purpose of taking dinner, but we all knew the liability of well-laid schemes, whether bi or quadrupedal, to go wrong. By the time we reached our first post of cavalry pickets we came up with the rear of a long wagon train, comprising one hundred and fifty vehicles, each drawn by six mules, driven by a very black and picturesque negro. This train must have been at least two miles long, for by the time we had reached the other end, riding leisurely, we were within a mile or two of Rockville. Here, just as we had passed the. last wagon, an excited horseman, coming from the direction of Rockville, halted our party, and in a somewhat con. fused voice gave us the pleasing intelligence t