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out two thousand bushels of corn, fell into our possession. Our loss was six killed, twenty-three wounded, and nine missing. The artillery placed in position was not used, but credit is due Major Mendenhall for his promptitude in placing his guns. To Brigadier-General Turchin, Brigadier-General Hazen, Colonel Stanley, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers, who had the superintendence of the boats, and was zealous in his duty, and to Captain Fox, First Michigan engineers, all credit is due for their zeal, coolness, and intelligence. Captain Dresser, Fourth artillery, and Captain P. E. F. West, U. S. Coast Survey, rendered every service on my staff. Lieutenants Klokke, Fuller, Hopkins, and Bent of the Signal corps, were zealous in the discharge of their duties, and soon succeeded in establishing a line of communication from the south side of the river. I inclose the reports of the various commanders. Respectfully submitted. W. F. Smith, Brigadier-General O. E., Commanding Expedition.
P. E. F. West (search for this): chapter 98
ut two thousand bushels of corn, fell into our possession. Our loss was six killed, twenty-three wounded, and nine missing. The artillery placed in position was not used, but credit is due Major Mendenhall for his promptitude in placing his guns. To Brigadier-General Turchin, Brigadier-General Hazen, Colonel Stanley, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers, who had the superintendence of the boats, and was zealous in his duty, and to Captain Fox, First Michigan engineers, all credit is due for their zeal, coolness, and intelligence. Captain Dresser, Fourth artillery, and Captain P. E. F. West, U. S. Coast Survey, rendered every service on my staff. Lieutenants Klokke, Fuller, Hopkins, and Bent of the Signal corps, were zealous in the discharge of their duties, and soon succeeded in establishing a line of communication from the south side of the river. I inclose the reports of the various commanders. Respectfully submitted. W. F. Smith, Brigadier-General O. E., Commanding Expedition.
W. F. Smith (search for this): chapter 98
er, (commanding the Eleventh and Twelfth corps,) and of Brigadier-General W. F. Smith, Chief Engineer Department of the Cunmberland, (commandy Saturday, the twenty-fourth, and the bridge completed, giving General Smith two days to examine the ground with the two brigade commanders,d stand of arms. I refer you to the reports of Generals Hooker and Smith for the details of the operations of their commands, commending to or gallant and meritorious conduct. The skilful execution by General Smith of the work assigned him, and the promptness with which Generalventh Corps,8814814200 Second Division, 12th Corps,841748216 Brig.-Gen. Smith's command,417--21 Total,437 Report of Brigadier-GeneraBrigadier-General W. F. Smith. headquarters Department of. The Cumberland, Office Chief Engineer, Chattanooga, Nov. 4, 1863. General: I have the hono I inclose the reports of the various commanders. Respectfully submitted. W. F. Smith, Brigadier-General O. E., Commanding Expedition.
ut two thousand bushels of corn, fell into our possession. Our loss was six killed, twenty-three wounded, and nine missing. The artillery placed in position was not used, but credit is due Major Mendenhall for his promptitude in placing his guns. To Brigadier-General Turchin, Brigadier-General Hazen, Colonel Stanley, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers, who had the superintendence of the boats, and was zealous in his duty, and to Captain Fox, First Michigan engineers, all credit is due for their zeal, coolness, and intelligence. Captain Dresser, Fourth artillery, and Captain P. E. F. West, U. S. Coast Survey, rendered every service on my staff. Lieutenants Klokke, Fuller, Hopkins, and Bent of the Signal corps, were zealous in the discharge of their duties, and soon succeeded in establishing a line of communication from the south side of the river. I inclose the reports of the various commanders. Respectfully submitted. W. F. Smith, Brigadier-General O. E., Commanding Expedition.
W. S. Rosecrans (search for this): chapter 98
ed.Missing.Total. Eleventh Corps,8814814200 Second Division, 12th Corps,841748216 Brig.-Gen. Smith's command,417--21 Total,437 Report of Brigadier-General W. F. Smith. headquarters Department of. The Cumberland, Office Chief Engineer, Chattanooga, Nov. 4, 1863. General: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations for making a lodgment on the south side of the Tennessee River, at Brown's Ferry. On the nineteenth of October, I was instructed by General Rosecrans to reconnoitre the river in the vicinity of Williams Island, with a view of making the island a cover for a steamboat landing and storehouses, and began the examination near the lower end of the island. Following the river up, I found on the opposite bank, above the head of the island, a sharp range of hills whose base was washed by the river. This range extended up the river nearly to Lookout Creek, and was broken at Brown's Ferry by a narrow gorge, through which ran the road to the
A. G. H. Wood (search for this): chapter 98
Doc. 96.-the battle of Wauhatchee. Official report of General Thomas. headquarters Department of the Cumberland, Chattanooga, Nov. 7, 1863. General: I have the honor to forward herewith the official reports of Major-General Hooker, (commanding the Eleventh and Twelfth corps,) and of Brigadier-General W. F. Smith, Chief Engineer Department of the Cunmberland, (commanding the expedition, composed of Turchin's brigade, Baird's division, Fourteenth army corps, and of Hazen's brigade, Wood's division, Fourth army corps, and detachments of the Eighteenth Ohio infantry, under command of Colonel T. R. Stanley, and of the First Michigan engineers, under command of Captain B. 1). Fox,) of the operations of their respective conimands between the twenty-sixth and twenty-eighth ultimo, to gain possession of the south bank of the Tennessee River, and to open the road for a depot of supplies at Bridgeport, Preliminary steps had already been taken to execute this vitally important move
W. B. Hazen (search for this): chapter 98
Turchin's brigade, Baird's division, Fourteenth army corps, and of Hazen's brigade, Wood's division, Fourth army corps, and detachments of tconsisted of the brigades of Brigadier-General Turchin and Brigadier-General Hazen, with three batteries, to be posted under the direction ofibuted as follows: One thousand five hundred men, under Brigadier-General Hazen, were to embark in the boats and pass down the river, a diints should be mistaken. The remainder of Generals Turchin's and Hazen's brigades were marched across and encamped in the woods out of sign cutting abattis for defence so soon as the ridge was gained. General Hazen was to take the gorge and hills to the left, while General Turcst Ohio volunteers, in command of the remnant of the brigade of General Hazen, was rapidly ferried across, and, forming his men, quickly pushtitude in placing his guns. To Brigadier-General Turchin, Brigadier-General Hazen, Colonel Stanley, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers, who had the
out two thousand bushels of corn, fell into our possession. Our loss was six killed, twenty-three wounded, and nine missing. The artillery placed in position was not used, but credit is due Major Mendenhall for his promptitude in placing his guns. To Brigadier-General Turchin, Brigadier-General Hazen, Colonel Stanley, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers, who had the superintendence of the boats, and was zealous in his duty, and to Captain Fox, First Michigan engineers, all credit is due for their zeal, coolness, and intelligence. Captain Dresser, Fourth artillery, and Captain P. E. F. West, U. S. Coast Survey, rendered every service on my staff. Lieutenants Klokke, Fuller, Hopkins, and Bent of the Signal corps, were zealous in the discharge of their duties, and soon succeeded in establishing a line of communication from the south side of the river. I inclose the reports of the various commanders. Respectfully submitted. W. F. Smith, Brigadier-General O. E., Commanding Expedition.
corps, and detachments of the Eighteenth Ohio infantry, under command of Colonel T. R. Stanley, and of the First Michigan engineers, under command of Captain B. 1). Fox,) of the operations of their respective conimands between the twenty-sixth and twenty-eighth ultimo, to gain possession of the south bank of the Tennessee River, anwas commenced, and continued under some shelling for an hour or so, and was completed at half-past 4 P. M., under the vigorous and skilful superintendence of Captain P. V. Fox, First Michigan engineers, and Captain George W. Dresser, Fourth artillery. Six prisoners were taken and six rebels buried by our command, and several wounderal Turchin, Brigadier-General Hazen, Colonel Stanley, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers, who had the superintendence of the boats, and was zealous in his duty, and to Captain Fox, First Michigan engineers, all credit is due for their zeal, coolness, and intelligence. Captain Dresser, Fourth artillery, and Captain P. E. F. West, U. S. Co
ngineer Department of the Cunmberland, (commanding the expedition, composed of Turchin's brigade, Baird's division, Fourteenth army corps, and of Hazen's brigade, Won. The force detailed for the expedition consisted of the brigades of Brigadier-General Turchin and Brigadier-General Hazen, with three batteries, to be posted underlest in the night the upper points should be mistaken. The remainder of Generals Turchin's and Hazen's brigades were marched across and encamped in the woods out o gained. General Hazen was to take the gorge and hills to the left, while General Turchin was to extend from the gorge down the river. The boats moved from Chattanentucky volunteers, already hard pressed. The skirmish was soon over, and General Turchin, who followed Lieutenant-Colonel Langdon, quietly took possession of the h is due Major Mendenhall for his promptitude in placing his guns. To Brigadier-General Turchin, Brigadier-General Hazen, Colonel Stanley, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers
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