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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore).

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... 143 144 145 146 147 148
Gettysburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 233
r and gentle presence his weary hours beguiled, And mingled tears and kisses were rained upon her cheek, While William looked the parting his lips refused to speak. The summer days went gliding in golden circles by, And Lee's impetuous army to Gettysburgh drew nigh; The fierce and bloody conflict swept through that region fair, Yet still heroic Jennie dwelt in the cottage there. And while her heart was aching, lest those she loved were dead, Her plump and rosy fingers moulded the soldiers breadet Jenny awaits for me at home. For this, (oh I hear me, heaven,) my eye shall never fail, My hand be true and steady to guide the leaden hail: A force more strong than powder, each deadly ball shall urge-- The memory of the maiden who died at Gettysburgh. “ And now, all bravely battling for freedom and for life, Whene'er the bugle soundeth to call him to the strife, He remembers that fair maiden, all cold and bloodylaid, And strikes with dread precision, as he thinks of Jennie Wade. E. S. T
She comes from St. Louis! by Edna Dean Proctor. On the sixteenth of July, 1868, the steamboat Imperial arrived at New-Orleans from St. Louis, the first boat between the cities for more than two years. She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She lies at the levee unmarred by a scar! No cursing guerrillas could frighten her back, Though longing, like bloodhounds, to leap on her track; Nor cannon to sink her, nor chain set to bar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! Who now will deny That Vicksburgh, Port Hudson, in ruins must lie? The good boat Imperial laughed them to scorn As bold to our levee she rounded at morn, And brought with her freedom and wealth from afar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! The river is free! What tidings of glory, New-Orleans, for thee! Oh! welcome her I herald the holiday time-- Fling out all your banners now — let the bells chime-- Of sunny days dawning, the harbinger
July 16th, 1868 AD (search for this): chapter 234
She comes from St. Louis! by Edna Dean Proctor. On the sixteenth of July, 1868, the steamboat Imperial arrived at New-Orleans from St. Louis, the first boat between the cities for more than two years. She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She lies at the levee unmarred by a scar! No cursing guerrillas could frighten her back, Though longing, like bloodhounds, to leap on her track; Nor cannon to sink her, nor chain set to bar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! Who now will deny That Vicksburgh, Port Hudson, in ruins must lie? The good boat Imperial laughed them to scorn As bold to our levee she rounded at morn, And brought with her freedom and wealth from afar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! The river is free! What tidings of glory, New-Orleans, for thee! Oh! welcome her I herald the holiday time-- Fling out all your banners now — let the bells chime-- Of sunny days dawning, the harbinger s
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 234
She comes from St. Louis! by Edna Dean Proctor. On the sixteenth of July, 1868, the steamboat Imperial arrived at New-Orleans from St. Louis, the first boat between the cities for more than two years. She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She lies at the levee unmarred by a scar! No cursing guerrillas could frighten her back, Though longing, like bloodhounds, to leap on her track; Nor cannon to sink her, nor chain set to bar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comeoat Imperial laughed them to scorn As bold to our levee she rounded at morn, And brought with her freedom and wealth from afar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! The river is free! What tidings of glory, New-Orleans, for thee! Oh! welcome her I herald the holiday time-- Fling out all your banners now — let the bells chime-- Of sunny days dawning, the harbinger star, She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! Our torpor is o'
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 234
She comes from St. Louis! by Edna Dean Proctor. On the sixteenth of July, 1868, the steamboat Imperial arrived at New-Orleans from St. Louis, the first boat between the cities for more than two years. She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She lies at the levee unmarred by a scar! Nok her, nor chain set to bar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louireedom and wealth from afar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. LouiSt. Louis! The river is free! What tidings of glory, New-Orleans, for thee! Oh! welcome her I herald the t. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! Our torpor is o'er; We breathe the fresh ar triumph can hinder or mar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. LouiSt. Louis! Away with the plea That river or people divided may be! One current sweeps past us, one likenesll bear; All hail to the day without malice or jar!-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah![2 more...]
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 234
sixteenth of July, 1868, the steamboat Imperial arrived at New-Orleans from St. Louis, the first boat between the cities for more than two years. She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She lies at the levee unmarred by a scar! No cursing guerrillas could frighten her back, Though longing, like bloodhounds, to leap on her track; Nor cannon to sink her, nor chain set to bar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! Who now will deny That Vicksburgh, Port Hudson, in ruins must lie? The good boat Imperial laughed them to scorn As bold to our levee she rounded at morn, And brought with her freedom and wealth from afar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! The river is free! What tidings of glory, New-Orleans, for thee! Oh! welcome her I herald the holiday time-- Fling out all your banners now — let the bells chime-- Of sunny days dawning, the harbinger star, She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She com
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 234
or. On the sixteenth of July, 1868, the steamboat Imperial arrived at New-Orleans from St. Louis, the first boat between the cities for more than two years. She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She lies at the levee unmarred by a scar! No cursing guerrillas could frighten her back, Though longing, like bloodhounds, to leap on her track; Nor cannon to sink her, nor chain set to bar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! Who now will deny That Vicksburgh, Port Hudson, in ruins must lie? The good boat Imperial laughed them to scorn As bold to our levee she rounded at morn, And brought with her freedom and wealth from afar-- She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hurrah! She comes from St. Louis! The river is free! What tidings of glory, New-Orleans, for thee! Oh! welcome her I herald the holiday time-- Fling out all your banners now — let the bells chime-- Of sunny days dawning, the harbinger star, She comes from St. Louis! Hurrah and hur
... 143 144 145 146 147 148