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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore).

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Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ng their line, And many a gleaming, hissing track athwart the heavens shine; 'Tis all in vain; their shot and shell fall short of every mark; Or, wildly erring, sullen plunge beneath the waters dark. 'Tis all in vain; our marksmen true, with an unerring aim, Behind their very ramparts lie, and bathe them red in flame; No foeman bold above those works may show his daring form; Down sentry, gunner, soldier, go beneath that leaden storm! Thou frowning battlement, Rebellion's only, fondest trust, With all their hopes, thy stubborn strength must topple to the dust; These waters, mingling from afar, as they sweep to the sea, Proclaim that they must still unite, that they must still be free! The time shall come when these proud hills no more shall quake with dread; Beneath their peaceful breast shall lie the heaps of gory dead; Redeemed from slavery's blighting curse, the battle's war shall cease, And all Columbia's broad domain shall smile in golden peace. Vicksburgh, Miss., June 21, 1863.
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
A midnight scene at Vicksburgh. by Horace B. Durant, Company A, One Hundredth Regiment Penn. V., First Division Ninth Army Corps. By Mississippi's mighty tide, our camp-fires flick'ring glow, O'er weary, tented, slumb'ring men, are burning dim and low; Calm be their rest beneath the shade of bending forest bough, And soft the night-wind as it creeps across the dreamer's brow; The hot glare that to-morrow shines Within this Southern land May drink its draught of crimson life that stains the bh all their hopes, thy stubborn strength must topple to the dust; These waters, mingling from afar, as they sweep to the sea, Proclaim that they must still unite, that they must still be free! The time shall come when these proud hills no more shall quake with dread; Beneath their peaceful breast shall lie the heaps of gory dead; Redeemed from slavery's blighting curse, the battle's war shall cease, And all Columbia's broad domain shall smile in golden peace. Vicksburgh, Miss., June 21, 1863.
and's dead. Oh! chant a requiem for the brave, the brave who are no more, New-England's dead! in honored rest they sleep on hill and shore, From where the Mississippi now in freedom proudly rolls To waves that sigh on Georgia's isles a death-hymn for their souls. Oh! first of all, the noble blood by traitorous hand was shed; It dyed the streets of Baltimore, New-England's heroes bled: And still the mystic number “three” will live for aye in song While history tells, with glowing pen, of Putnam, Shaw, and Strong. Immortal names. O noble “three!” a nation's heart will throb For ye who fell, in manly prime, for Freedom and for God! And women's eyes grow dim with tears, and manhood bows its head Before thy deeds of valor done, New-England's honored dead. But not alone for those who die a soldier's death of glory: Full many a brave, heroic soul has sighed its mournful story Down in the sultry swamps and plains, where fever's subtle breath Has drained the life-blood from their hearts,
fell, in manly prime, for Freedom and for God! And women's eyes grow dim with tears, and manhood bows its head Before thy deeds of valor done, New-England's honored dead. But not alone for those who die a soldier's death of glory: Full many a brave, heroic soul has sighed its mournful story Down in the sultry swamps and plains, where fever's subtle breath Has drained the life-blood from their hearts, and laid them low in death-- As proud a memory yours, O ye who murmured no complaint! Who saw Hope's vision day by day grow indistinct and faint; Who, far from home and loving hearts, from all yet held most dear, Have died. O noble, unknown dead! ye leave a record here! New-England! on thy spotless shield, inscribe thine honored dead, Oh! keep their memory fresh and green, when turf blooms o'er their head; And coming nations yet unborn will read, with glowing pride, Of those who bore thy conquering arms, and suffering, fought and died; Who, foremost in the gallant van, laid life and ho
Robert Gould Shaw (search for this): chapter 13
ead. Oh! chant a requiem for the brave, the brave who are no more, New-England's dead! in honored rest they sleep on hill and shore, From where the Mississippi now in freedom proudly rolls To waves that sigh on Georgia's isles a death-hymn for their souls. Oh! first of all, the noble blood by traitorous hand was shed; It dyed the streets of Baltimore, New-England's heroes bled: And still the mystic number “three” will live for aye in song While history tells, with glowing pen, of Putnam, Shaw, and Strong. Immortal names. O noble “three!” a nation's heart will throb For ye who fell, in manly prime, for Freedom and for God! And women's eyes grow dim with tears, and manhood bows its head Before thy deeds of valor done, New-England's honored dead. But not alone for those who die a soldier's death of glory: Full many a brave, heroic soul has sighed its mournful story Down in the sultry swamps and plains, where fever's subtle breath Has drained the life-blood from their hearts, and la
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
New-England's dead. Oh! chant a requiem for the brave, the brave who are no more, New-England's dead! in honored rest they sleep on hill and shore, From where the Mississippi now in freedom proudly rolls To waves that sigh on Georgia's isles a death-hymn for their souls. Oh! first of all, the noble blood by traitorous hand was shed; It dyed the streets of Baltimore, New-England's heroes bled: And still the mystic number “three” will live for aye in song While history tells, with glowing pen, of Putnam, Shaw, and Strong. Immortal names. O noble “three!” a nation's heart will throb For ye who fell, in manly prime, for Freedom and for God! And women's eyes grow dim with tears, and manhood bows its head Before thy deeds of valor done, New-England's honored dead. But not alone for those who die a soldier's death of glory: Full many a brave, heroic soul has sighed its mournful story Down in the sultry swamps and plains, where fever's subtle breath Has drained the life-blood from th
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
New-England's dead. Oh! chant a requiem for the brave, the brave who are no more, New-England's dead! in honored rest they sleep on hill and shore, From where the Mississippi now in freedom proudly rolls To waves that sigh on Georgia's isles a death-hymn for their souls. Oh! first of all, the noble blood by traitorous hand was shed; It dyed the streets of Baltimore, New-England's heroes bled: And still the mystic number “three” will live for aye in song While history tells, with glowing pen, of Putnam, Shaw, and Strong. Immortal names. O noble “three!” a nation's heart will throb For ye who fell, in manly prime, for Freedom and for God! And women's eyes grow dim with tears, and manhood bows its head Before thy deeds of valor done, New-England's honored dead. But not alone for those who die a soldier's death of glory: Full many a brave, heroic soul has sighed its mournful story Down in the sultry swamps and plains, where fever's subtle breath Has drained the life-blood from th
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
New-England's dead. Oh! chant a requiem for the brave, the brave who are no more, New-England's dead! in honored rest they sleep on hill and shore, From where the Mississippi now in freedom proNew-England's dead! in honored rest they sleep on hill and shore, From where the Mississippi now in freedom proudly rolls To waves that sigh on Georgia's isles a death-hymn for their souls. Oh! first of all, the noble blood by traitorous hand was shed; It dyed the streets of Baltimore, New-England's heroes bNew-England's heroes bled: And still the mystic number “three” will live for aye in song While history tells, with glowing pen, of Putnam, Shaw, and Strong. Immortal names. O noble “three!” a nation's heart will throb Fod women's eyes grow dim with tears, and manhood bows its head Before thy deeds of valor done, New-England's honored dead. But not alone for those who die a soldier's death of glory: Full many a braverts, from all yet held most dear, Have died. O noble, unknown dead! ye leave a record here! New-England! on thy spotless shield, inscribe thine honored dead, Oh! keep their memory fresh and gree
(known as the Greybeard regiment ) left St. Louis on Monday for the South. A striking peculiarity of this regiment is, that nearly all its members, officers and men, are over forty-five years of age. Three fourths of them are grey-headed, and many have long white beards, giving them a venerable appearance. Many have sent their sons to the field, and are now following them. One of the arts by which the Southern heart is fired is this: Soon after the battle of Murfreesboro, the rebel General Bragg caused to be printed and widely circulated in the army counterfeits of the Nashville Union, in which was conspicuously displayed Startling News! Four States Seceded from the Old Government! Missouri, Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky! This was followed by an editorial bewailing the loss of these States. Of course the whole affair was a forgery, but the illiterate soldiery of the South, a large proportion of whom cannot read at all, could not detect it. While Buckner was in Kentucky, bo
ty-five years of age. Three fourths of them are grey-headed, and many have long white beards, giving them a venerable appearance. Many have sent their sons to the field, and are now following them. One of the arts by which the Southern heart is fired is this: Soon after the battle of Murfreesboro, the rebel General Bragg caused to be printed and widely circulated in the army counterfeits of the Nashville Union, in which was conspicuously displayed Startling News! Four States Seceded from the Old Government! Missouri, Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky! This was followed by an editorial bewailing the loss of these States. Of course the whole affair was a forgery, but the illiterate soldiery of the South, a large proportion of whom cannot read at all, could not detect it. While Buckner was in Kentucky, bogus copies of the Louisville Journal were freely circulated by the rebels, filled with all kinds of matter adapted to inflame and encourage the rebels, and discourage the loyal.
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