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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore).

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Harrington (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Lieutenant Pike, son of the editor of the Augusta (Me.) Age, lost a leg in the battle of Williamsburgh. He, however, remained in the field, and led his battery on horseback, carrying his crutches with him.
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 23
The Chattanooga Rebel mentions the fact that the wife of General John C. Breckinridge has had prepared a magnificent stand of colors, constructed from the silk of the wedding-dress worn by herself upon the day of her marriage, to be presented through her husband to the most gallant and brave regiment of his division. The Rebel understands that this appropriate and valued present has been bestowed upon the Twentieth Tennessee regiment, commanded by Col. Tom Smith, and well known as the famous Battle regiment, that did such gallant service in the disastrous battle of Fishing Creek.--Jackson Crisis, Feb. 25
The Chattanooga Rebel mentions the fact that the wife of General John C. Breckinridge has had prepared a magnificent stand of colors, constructed from the silk of the wedding-dress worn by herself upon the day of her marriage, to be presented through her husband to the most gallant and brave regiment of his division. The Rebel understands that this appropriate and valued present has been bestowed upon the Twentieth Tennessee regiment, commanded by Col. Tom Smith, and well known as the famous Battle regiment, that did such gallant service in the disastrous battle of Fishing Creek.--Jackson Crisis, Feb. 25
The Chattanooga Rebel mentions the fact that the wife of General John C. Breckinridge has had prepared a magnificent stand of colors, constructed from the silk of the wedding-dress worn by herself upon the day of her marriage, to be presented through her husband to the most gallant and brave regiment of his division. The Rebel understands that this appropriate and valued present has been bestowed upon the Twentieth Tennessee regiment, commanded by Col. Tom Smith, and well known as the famous Battle regiment, that did such gallant service in the disastrous battle of Fishing Creek.--Jackson Crisis, Feb. 25
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
The Chattanooga Rebel mentions the fact that the wife of General John C. Breckinridge has had prepared a magnificent stand of colors, constructed from the silk of the wedding-dress worn by herself upon the day of her marriage, to be presented through her husband to the most gallant and brave regiment of his division. The Rebel understands that this appropriate and valued present has been bestowed upon the Twentieth Tennessee regiment, commanded by Col. Tom Smith, and well known as the famous Battle regiment, that did such gallant service in the disastrous battle of Fishing Creek.--Jackson Crisis, Feb. 25
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 24
Anecdote of General Grant. The following is told by an officer of General Grant's staff: ThGeneral Grant's staff: The hero and veteran, who was citizen, captain, colonel, brigadier and major-general within a space o his skill and bravery as a commander. When Grant was a brigadier in South-east Missouri, he comieutenants entered the dwelling. He knew that Grant's incipient fame had already gone out through he was, and he told them that he was Brigadier-General Grant. At the sound of that name they flewn their way rejoicing. In the mean time General Grant, who had halted his army a few miles furthl. No, said a female, in a gruff voice; General Grant and his staff have just been here. and eause except one pumpkin pie. Humph, murmured Grant; what is your name? Selvidge, replied the w one hundred cavalry and eat that pie also. U. S. Grant, Brigadier-General Commanding. Grant's Grant's orders were law, and no soldier ever attempted to evade them. At seven o'clock the Lieuten ant fil
Jefferson Thompson (search for this): chapter 24
lonel, brigadier and major-general within a space of nine months, though a rigid disciplinarian, and a perfect Ironsides in the discharge of his official duties, could enjoy a good joke, and is always ready to perpetrate one when an opportunity presents. Indeed, among his acquaintances, he is as much renowned for his eccentric humor as he is for his skill and bravery as a commander. When Grant was a brigadier in South-east Missouri, he commanded an expedition against the rebels under Jeff. Thompson, in North-east Arkansas. The distance from the starting-point of the expedition to the supposed rendezvous of the rebels was about one hundred and ten miles, and the greater portion of the route lay through a howling wilderness. The imaginary suffering that our soldiers endured during the first two days of their march was enormous. It was impossible to steal or confiscate uncultivated real estate, and not a hog, or a chicken, or an ear of corn was anywhere to be seen. On the third da
ff. Thompson, in North-east Arkansas. The distance from the starting-point of the expedition to the supposed rendezvous of the rebels was about one hundred and ten miles, and the greater portion of the route lay through a howling wilderness. The imaginary suffering that our soldiers endured during the first two days of their march was enormous. It was impossible to steal or confiscate uncultivated real estate, and not a hog, or a chicken, or an ear of corn was anywhere to be seen. On the third day, however, affairs looked more hopeful, for a few small specks of ground, in a state of partial cultivation, were here and there visible. On that day, Lieutenant Wickfield, of an Indiana cavalry regiment, commanded the advanceguard, consisting of eight mounted men. About noon he came up to a small farm-house, from the outward appearance of which he judged that there might be something fit to eat inside. He halted his company, dismounted, and with two second lieutenants entered the dwell
ing. And they went on their way rejoicing. In the mean time General Grant, who had halted his army a few miles further back for a brief resting spell, came in sight of, and was rather favorably impressed with, the appearance of this same house. Riding up to the fence in front of the door, he desired to know if they would cook him a meal. No, said a female, in a gruff voice; General Grant and his staff have just been here. and eaten every thing in the house except one pumpkin pie. Humph, murmured Grant; what is your name? Selvidge, replied the woman. Casting a half-dollar in at the door, he asked if she would keep that pie till he sent an officer for it, to which she replied that she would. That evening, after the camping-ground had been selected, the various regiments were notified that there would be a grand parade at half-past 6, for orders. Officers would see that their men all turned out, etc. In five minutes the camp was in a perfect uproar, and filled wi
day, however, affairs looked more hopeful, for a few small specks of ground, in a state of partial cultivation, were here and there visible. On that day, Lieutenant Wickfield, of an Indiana cavalry regiment, commanded the advanceguard, consisting of eight mounted men. About noon he came up to a small farm-house, from the outwardthe usual routine of ceremonies the Acting Assistant Adjutant-General read the following order: Special order, no.--.Headquarters, army in the field. Lieutenant Wickfield, of the----Indiana cavalry, having on this day eaten everything in Mrs. Selvidge's house, at the crossing of the Ironton and Pocahontas and Black River and Cape Girardeau roads, except one pumpkin pie, Lieutenant Wickfield is hereby ordered to return with an escort of one hundred cavalry and eat that pie also. U. S. Grant, Brigadier-General Commanding. Grant's orders were law, and no soldier ever attempted to evade them. At seven o'clock the Lieuten ant filed out of camp with
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