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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore).

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March 16th (search for this): chapter 18
The First recruit. On the sixteenth of April, 1861, when the Governor of Pennsylvania, just after the Fort Sumter affair, at the instance of President Lincoln, called for three companies of militia from the counties of Mifflin, Schuylkill, and Berks, the first recruit was a Philadelphian, who telegraphed his application. He served three months with the Logan guard, of Lewistown, Mifflin county, and is now in the Armory Square Hospital, under Surgeon George H. Mitchell's medical treatment. His name is John T. Hunter, and he is now attached to the Nineteenth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers.--Philadelphia Inquirer, March 16.
The First recruit. On the sixteenth of April, 1861, when the Governor of Pennsylvania, just after the Fort Sumter affair, at the instance of President Lincoln, called for three companies of militia from the counties of Mifflin, Schuylkill, and Berks, the first recruit was a Philadelphian, who telegraphed his application. He served three months with the Logan guard, of Lewistown, Mifflin county, and is now in the Armory Square Hospital, under Surgeon George H. Mitchell's medical treatment. His name is John T. Hunter, and he is now attached to the Nineteenth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers.--Philadelphia Inquirer, March 16.
April 16th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 18
The First recruit. On the sixteenth of April, 1861, when the Governor of Pennsylvania, just after the Fort Sumter affair, at the instance of President Lincoln, called for three companies of militia from the counties of Mifflin, Schuylkill, and Berks, the first recruit was a Philadelphian, who telegraphed his application. He served three months with the Logan guard, of Lewistown, Mifflin county, and is now in the Armory Square Hospital, under Surgeon George H. Mitchell's medical treatment. His name is John T. Hunter, and he is now attached to the Nineteenth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers.--Philadelphia Inquirer, March 16.
George H. Mitchell (search for this): chapter 18
The First recruit. On the sixteenth of April, 1861, when the Governor of Pennsylvania, just after the Fort Sumter affair, at the instance of President Lincoln, called for three companies of militia from the counties of Mifflin, Schuylkill, and Berks, the first recruit was a Philadelphian, who telegraphed his application. He served three months with the Logan guard, of Lewistown, Mifflin county, and is now in the Armory Square Hospital, under Surgeon George H. Mitchell's medical treatment. His name is John T. Hunter, and he is now attached to the Nineteenth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers.--Philadelphia Inquirer, March 16.
John T. Hunter (search for this): chapter 18
The First recruit. On the sixteenth of April, 1861, when the Governor of Pennsylvania, just after the Fort Sumter affair, at the instance of President Lincoln, called for three companies of militia from the counties of Mifflin, Schuylkill, and Berks, the first recruit was a Philadelphian, who telegraphed his application. He served three months with the Logan guard, of Lewistown, Mifflin county, and is now in the Armory Square Hospital, under Surgeon George H. Mitchell's medical treatment. His name is John T. Hunter, and he is now attached to the Nineteenth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers.--Philadelphia Inquirer, March 16.
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
The First recruit. On the sixteenth of April, 1861, when the Governor of Pennsylvania, just after the Fort Sumter affair, at the instance of President Lincoln, called for three companies of militia from the counties of Mifflin, Schuylkill, and Berks, the first recruit was a Philadelphian, who telegraphed his application. He served three months with the Logan guard, of Lewistown, Mifflin county, and is now in the Armory Square Hospital, under Surgeon George H. Mitchell's medical treatment. His name is John T. Hunter, and he is now attached to the Nineteenth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers.--Philadelphia Inquirer, March 16.
Berks (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
The First recruit. On the sixteenth of April, 1861, when the Governor of Pennsylvania, just after the Fort Sumter affair, at the instance of President Lincoln, called for three companies of militia from the counties of Mifflin, Schuylkill, and Berks, the first recruit was a Philadelphian, who telegraphed his application. He served three months with the Logan guard, of Lewistown, Mifflin county, and is now in the Armory Square Hospital, under Surgeon George H. Mitchell's medical treatment. His name is John T. Hunter, and he is now attached to the Nineteenth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers.--Philadelphia Inquirer, March 16.
Schuylkill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
The First recruit. On the sixteenth of April, 1861, when the Governor of Pennsylvania, just after the Fort Sumter affair, at the instance of President Lincoln, called for three companies of militia from the counties of Mifflin, Schuylkill, and Berks, the first recruit was a Philadelphian, who telegraphed his application. He served three months with the Logan guard, of Lewistown, Mifflin county, and is now in the Armory Square Hospital, under Surgeon George H. Mitchell's medical treatment. His name is John T. Hunter, and he is now attached to the Nineteenth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers.--Philadelphia Inquirer, March 16.
Lewistown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
The First recruit. On the sixteenth of April, 1861, when the Governor of Pennsylvania, just after the Fort Sumter affair, at the instance of President Lincoln, called for three companies of militia from the counties of Mifflin, Schuylkill, and Berks, the first recruit was a Philadelphian, who telegraphed his application. He served three months with the Logan guard, of Lewistown, Mifflin county, and is now in the Armory Square Hospital, under Surgeon George H. Mitchell's medical treatment. His name is John T. Hunter, and he is now attached to the Nineteenth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers.--Philadelphia Inquirer, March 16.
February 4th (search for this): chapter 19
Laporte, Pa., Feb. 4. There may be but few persons outside of the army who are prone to credit the reports of atrocities which are perpetrated by the rebels upon the unsuspecting and innocent; but nevertheless there is much perpetrated that is almost too shocking to be brought before the public at home, of cruelties committed abroad by the rebel soldiery. The last and most demoniacal thing brought to our notice is a small instrument invented by them to cripple the horses of our cavalry. It is constructed of four pieces of rod-iron hardened, less than a quarter of an inch in thickness, and about two inches long. Four of the ends are made to centre together, and they project from the middle in the form of arms. To the extreme end of each is welded out a very sharp point. These are intended to be sprinkled through the woods and over roads, to prevent the advance of cavalry. No matter how thrown, one of the points will stand perpendicularly, and when the horse treads upon it, it w
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